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Will someone breakdown the different types of teas to me?

FortFunFoSho

Golden Member
Mar 7, 2002
1,101
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0
So someone told me I should drink green tea if I am looking for a boost.
Is this true?

What are all the different types? And whata re they good for?
 

guapo337

Platinum Member
Apr 7, 2003
2,580
0
0
Green, White, Black, Herbal..

I usually just drink English breakfast or orange pekoe. Both are black teas. Good all day.

White tea is intense.
 

rgwalt

Diamond Member
Apr 22, 2000
7,393
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0
All teas, except for purely herbal teas, contain caffeine. Some herbal teas contain substance that are caffeine-like. Yerba matte, for instance, contains a chemical that is very similar to caffeine and acts as a stimulant. When I've been dosed up on caffeine to the point that it has no effect on me, yerba matte will give me a kick. Actually, simply switching from soda to coffee to tea seems to give me a boost even when I've built up a tolarance to caffeine from a certain drink. But, I digress. I don't know much about white tea, but black tea generally contains more caffeine than green tea.

What are you looking for in a tea? I generally enjoy a good black tea. I typically drink Lipton for the sake of cost and convience, but I do enjoy "finer" teas. If you can find them, look for a place that sells loose leaf teas. Get a tea-ball and try a few varieties until you find something you like. I really enjoy green tea, but there are SO many varieties, it is tough to decide. In my opinion, the key is finding a few different varieties that you enjoy, are readily available, and that aren't too expensive.

Ryan
 

Bullhonkie

Golden Member
Sep 28, 2001
1,899
0
71
If you're looking for a good (or overwhelming) variety of teas, some asian grocery stores I've seen have an entire aisle dedicated just for teas.
 

OrganizedChaos

Diamond Member
Apr 21, 2002
4,525
0
0
not what you wanted but a good read, written by the greatest author of all time


One or two Americans have asked me why it is that the English like tea so much, which never seems to them to be a very good drink. To understand, you have to know how to make it properly.

There is a very simple principle to the making of tea and it's this - to get the proper flavour of tea, the water has to be boiling (not boiled) when it hits the tea leaves. If it's merely hot then the tea will be insipid. That's why we English have these odd rituals, such as warming the teapot first (so as not to cause the boiling water to cool down too fast as it hits the pot). And that's why the American habit of bringing a teacup, a tea bag and a pot of hot water to the table is merely the perfect way of making a thin, pale, watery cup of tea that nobody in their right mind would want to drink. The Americans are all mystified about why the English make such a big thing out of tea because most Americans have never had a good cup of tea. That's why they don't understand. In fact the truth of the matter is that most English people don't know how to make tea any more either, and most people drink cheap instant coffee instead, which is a pity, and gives Americans the impression that the English are just generally clueless about hot stimulants.

So the best advice I can give to an American arriving in England is this. Go to Marks and Spencer and buy a packet of Earl Grey tea. Go back to where you're staying and boil a kettle of water. While it is coming to the boil, open the sealed packet and sniff. Careful - you may feel a bit dizzy, but this is in fact perfectly legal. When the kettle has boiled, pour a little of it into a tea pot, swirl it around and tip it out again. Put a couple (or three, depending on the size of the pot) of tea bags into the pot (If I was really trying to lead you into the paths of righteousness I would tell you to use free leaves rather than bags, but let's just take this in easy stages). Bring the kettle back up to the boil, and then pour the boiling water as quickly as you can into the pot. Let it stand for two or three minutes, and then pour it into a cup. Some people will tell you that you shouldn't have milk with Earl Grey, just a slice of lemon. Screw them. I like it with milk. If you think you will like it with milk then it's probably best to put some milk into the bottom of the cup before you pour in the tea.1 If you pour milk into a cup of hot tea you will scald the milk. If you think you will prefer it with a slice of lemon then, well, add a slice of lemon.

Drink it. After a few moments you will begin to think that the place you've come to isn't maybe quite so strange and crazy after all.

1 This is socially incorrect. The socially correct way of pouring tea is to put the milk in after the tea. Social correctness has traditionally had nothing whatever to do with reason, logic or physics. In fact, in England it is generally considered socially incorrect to know stuff or think about things. It's worth bearing this in mind when visiting.


 

db

Lifer
Dec 6, 1999
10,353
279
126
Originally posted by: OrganizedChaos
not what you wanted but a good read, written by the greatest author of all time


One or two Americans have asked me why it is that the English like tea so much, which never seems to them to be a very good drink. To understand, you have to know how to make it properly.

There is a very simple principle to the making of tea and it's this - to get the proper flavour of tea, the water has to be boiling (not boiled) when it hits the tea leaves. If it's merely hot then the tea will be insipid. That's why we English have these odd rituals, such as warming the teapot first (so as not to cause the boiling water to cool down too fast as it hits the pot). And that's why the American habit of bringing a teacup, a tea bag and a pot of hot water to the table is merely the perfect way of making a thin, pale, watery cup of tea that nobody in their right mind would want to drink. The Americans are all mystified about why the English make such a big thing out of tea because most Americans have never had a good cup of tea. That's why they don't understand. In fact the truth of the matter is that most English people don't know how to make tea any more either, and most people drink cheap instant coffee instead, which is a pity, and gives Americans the impression that the English are just generally clueless about hot stimulants.

So the best advice I can give to an American arriving in England is this. Go to Marks and Spencer and buy a packet of Earl Grey tea. Go back to where you're staying and boil a kettle of water. While it is coming to the boil, open the sealed packet and sniff. Careful - you may feel a bit dizzy, but this is in fact perfectly legal. When the kettle has boiled, pour a little of it into a tea pot, swirl it around and tip it out again. Put a couple (or three, depending on the size of the pot) of tea bags into the pot (If I was really trying to lead you into the paths of righteousness I would tell you to use free leaves rather than bags, but let's just take this in easy stages). Bring the kettle back up to the boil, and then pour the boiling water as quickly as you can into the pot. Let it stand for two or three minutes, and then pour it into a cup. Some people will tell you that you shouldn't have milk with Earl Grey, just a slice of lemon. Screw them. I like it with milk. If you think you will like it with milk then it's probably best to put some milk into the bottom of the cup before you pour in the tea.1 If you pour milk into a cup of hot tea you will scald the milk. If you think you will prefer it with a slice of lemon then, well, add a slice of lemon.

Drink it. After a few moments you will begin to think that the place you've come to isn't maybe quite so strange and crazy after all.

1 This is socially incorrect. The socially correct way of pouring tea is to put the milk in after the tea. Social correctness has traditionally had nothing whatever to do with reason, logic or physics. In fact, in England it is generally considered socially incorrect to know stuff or think about things. It's worth bearing this in mind when visiting.
Thanks. Factual, but slightly arrogant--how British ;)
 

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