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Question Why my CPU stuck at Full Turbo Speed

Mir96TA

Golden Member
Oct 21, 2002
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This is my first 10 Gen Intel cpu.
Previously when load is idle, it clock down to slowest possible speed, until load comes along
1621783792447.png

This is stuck at full Turbo Speed.
Why ?
I don't want my daughter's computer have a short life, or cost me extra pennies to run her computer.
Hardware:
CPU : Intel Core i3-10100F CPU
Motherboard: ASRock Z590 Phantom Gaming 4/ac
South Bridge : Intel Z590 rev 11
BIOS: P1.30 Factory and latest (02/01/2021)
Memory (RAM)16 Gig F4-3200C14-8GFX
Dual Channel (128 bit) DDR4-SDRAM
Frequency 1662.3 MHz (DDR4-3324) - Ratio 1:25
Timings: 14-14-14-34-2 (tCAS-tRCD-tRP-tRAS-tCR)

CPUZ info is Linkifid
 

coercitiv

Diamond Member
Jan 24, 2014
4,622
6,418
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Short version: There's nothing wrong with your PC. Let you daughter enjoy it.

Long version: There's nothing really wrong with letting the CPU run at high speeds (will not shorthen you CPUs lifespan), if you want to make sure it also uses the least amount of power then just make sure that Sleep States are enabled.

The most probable cause for the 4GHz speed at "idle" that you're seeing is that the Task Manager is unable to report CPU frequency correctly due to the CPU changing clocks based on a hardware algorithm called SpeedShift. This is a better way of offering both better performance under load and lower power consumption at idle. SpeedShift usually gets enabled automatically when the motherboard is configured to use more advanced sleep states. (somewhere inside your motherboard's BIOS there's a setting called "CPU Sleep States", this should be set to AUTO or one of the higher supported sleep states like "C7" for example)

PS: was it you who overclocked the memory on that PC or was it your daughter? If it wasn't you then you might want to let her learn more about tinkering with a PC, since she's obviously curious enough to experiment.
 

Mir96TA

Golden Member
Oct 21, 2002
1,913
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My daughter is 12 and she have no interest in computer Hardware haa.
I slightly OC the memory for her
and Yes all C state are enable and Auto
 
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coercitiv

Diamond Member
Jan 24, 2014
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and Yes all C state are enable and Auto
Then you're very likely to have SpeedShift enabled, which means Task Manager won't accurately report clocks anymore. As I mentioned before this is a good thing, as the CPU will be more responsive while also saving power.

If you're still curious to check that everything is in order, I suggest using HWiNFO64 to check whether SpeedShift is enabled. This software will also be able to show clocks more accurately, and you can see for yourself how the cores enter sleep and save power. Here's a few screenshots from my PC to help you navigate what HWiNFO64 offers in terms of information:

In the pic bellow you can see the "System Summary" window of HWiNFO, which as you can see reports a different CPU speed as oposed to the Task Manager on the left. Also on the System Summary, in the Features tab, there's a number of capabilities highlighted with green since they're enabled. One of them is SST, which stands for Speed Shift Technology. (highlighted by me with a red arrow)
sst.png

Also, if you open the "Sensors" window, you can find a "C-State Residency" area, showing how much time the CPU spends in sleep mode. When the system is idle, core sleep state residency should look like what you can see bellow. (over 90% of the time cores should be in a deep sleep state).

1621842852318.png
 
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Mir96TA

Golden Member
Oct 21, 2002
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Yep
I have intel SST Enable.
L@@K at PWR Budget.
God for Sake it is i3
I guess, Intel has grown out of their Budget and TDP criteria.
I never seen such an aggressive PWR Budget for an i3
This is a true 90 watt TDP CPU
65Watt is an eyewash.
intel-SST.JPG
 
Last edited:

ondma

Platinum Member
Mar 18, 2018
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Technically, it is the motherboard manufacturers that allow the cpu to exceed its PL1 and PL2, although I am sure Intel tacitly encourages it because it gives better performance. There should be settings in the BIOS to enforce the 65W TDP if it really is that important to you. Personally, I would just not worry about it. At only 4ghz for a quad core, I doubt the cpu will come close to using 90 watts (or even 65W) unless you are doing encoding/stress tests or very cpu intensive gaming.
 
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Mir96TA

Golden Member
Oct 21, 2002
1,913
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91
Now I understand what is going on, so I am fine with it.
It was a learning curve for me, how CPU Turbo and sst works.
This is an i3 which is non K class cpu.
I can only imagine how K version will OC
Mir
 

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