Why is it considered rude or unprofessional to inquire about compensation for a job?

Oct 9, 1999
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#1
Obviously the primary goal of working is to earn a living, but all too often I see comments from recruiters as though asking about pay and benefits prior to an interview is crossing the Rubicon.

I currently have a pretty good job, it seems pretty obvious that I'd rather not waste my time with the interview process if the compensation is not greater than or equal to what I'm currently making. Thoughts?
 
Jul 1, 2001
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#2
Personally, I think that it's fair to always ask recruiter about an estimated salary range before doing an in person interview. It certainly beats wasting your time going through the application process only to find out that the company isn't willing to pay market rates for your talent.
 
Jan 8, 2010
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#3
I've never interviewed for a job prior to knowing what the pay was going to be. Waste of everyone's time.
 
Oct 9, 1999
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#4
Yeah, to me, unwillingness to disclose even a range is a big signal that they don't regard the pay as competitive. Which equals instant hard pass.
 

brandonbull

Diamond Member
May 3, 2005
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#5
Always ask what the pay range is upfront before beginning any interview process.
 
Apr 8, 2002
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#6
Obviously the primary goal of working is to earn a living, but all too often I see comments from recruiters as though asking about pay and benefits prior to an interview is crossing the Rubicon.

I currently have a pretty good job, it seems pretty obvious that I'd rather not waste my time with the interview process if the compensation is not greater than or equal to what I'm currently making. Thoughts?
Wouldnt your recruiter provide that info before showing up for the interview? I do not think it is rude to ask the recruiter for a pay range before interviewing. It is taboo to ask about pay on the first interview. Unless the company brings it up. But they usually bring it up asking what you are currently making. I handle this two ways.

1. I give them what I want to earn as the number I am currently making.
2. Push it back at them and ask what is your range? Or send me an offer and lets see if we can work something out.
 
Apr 26, 2001
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#7
It's not. If a place you're trying to work makes you feel like either of those are true, you've hit red flag territory and they've done you a favor by making your decision easy.
 

rh71

No Lifer
Aug 28, 2001
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#8
Through a recruiter, absolutely ask - they are on your side. My wife was called by a recruiter just yesterday and she asked and they told her with no hesitation.

Through an employer, you'll have to put it in a way that let's them know you just don't want to waste anyone's time. I would ask for sure unless I'm desperate and don't want to even hint at being money-hungry.
 
Jun 23, 2005
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#10
Because knowledge is power. They would just as soon use people's ignorance of going rates as a means of paying you less.
 

thebestMAX

Diamond Member
Sep 14, 2000
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#13
When I was a District Sales Rep, I always took control of the interview and asked. Compensation or range, commission, expense account, car and perks. If the job didnt come with all of those, I wasnt interested and didnt want to waste my time and theirs. Got a lot of positive comments from interviewers and offers. Dont know how this would go over today.
 

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