Why does cancer kill?

Zim Hosein

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Originally posted by: dejitaru
What does it do and how do you get it? A mutation would seem like an enhancement.

rolleye.gif
 

Zim Hosein

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Originally posted by: CallTheFBI
Originally posted by: dejitaru
What does it do and how do you get it? A mutation would seem like an enhancement.

You have got to be kidding, right?

Sadly, I think the answer is no :( :confused:
 

ElFenix

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leeches nutrients and interferes with the normal bodily functions.
 

Aceshigh

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I know there is a school of thought out there that believes cancer does not kill, that the majority of cancer deaths are a result of the cancer treatment. And that if you take no treatment or rely only on natural herbs and such that you will be fine. I think these people are pretty much quacks.

My father passed away from cancer, and he only had chemotherapy for a very short time before discontinuing it.

That was about 12 years ago. I do think cancer treatments are improving greatly.

There will always be isolated cases of spontaneous remission, but for the most part, if you have cancer and take no treatment, your chances of recovery are greatly decreased and you will die much more quickly than if you fight it.
 

ReiAyanami

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Sep 24, 2002
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A mutation would seem like an enhancement.

Too many Xmen comics....

no, he's viewed too many tobacco ads.

remember smoking makes you healthier.
rolleye.gif
 

Blain

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Oct 9, 1999
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The Feb. issue of Popular Mechanics has an article about Dr. Wilfred Jefferies with GeneMax, working on a therapy in which the cancer cells can be attacked by T cells in the body.
Basically the article explains that the cancer cells are "masked" from the body's own immune system. And that by unmasking the cancer cells, T cells can swing into action and attack the cancer.
 

VBboy

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Nov 12, 2000
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Originally posted by: ReiAyanami
A mutation would seem like an enhancement.

Too many Xmen comics....

no, he's viewed too many tobacco ads.

remember smoking makes you healthier.
rolleye.gif

It does, when used during regular BDSM sessions :)
 

GasX

Lifer
Feb 8, 2001
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I'll give you the short answer.

Cancer begins when a cell mutates into an out of control cell that does not follow the normal cell cycle and, for the most part, divides rapidly forming a tumor.

A benign cancer is one that the growth of this tumor is confined to a single location. A malignant one is where cells break off from the tumor, move to another part of the body and begin growing there.

Benign tumors are usually not a problem, but imagine a tumor slowly growing in size inside the limited volume of your brain. In this case, even a benign tumor can kill you. A malignant tumor will spread throughout the body and will disrupt the tissues that it invades. It does not destroy cells.
 

GasX

Lifer
Feb 8, 2001
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A further note from the "how stuff works" link above

Tumors can cause destruction in three common ways:

  • Tumors put pressure on nearby tissues and/or organs.
    Tumors invade tissues and organs directly (direct extension), often damaging or disabling them in the process.
    Tumors make invaded tissues and/or organs susceptible to infection.
Tumors can also release substances that destroy tissues in close proximity to them.

So, cancer can cause cell damage, but it is a sometimes seen effect - not the defining "It's that simple" explanation...
 

Rudee

Lifer
Apr 23, 2000
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When cancer reproduces, it certainly does destroy healthy cells. I choose not to get into detail, thus it was considered a simple answer.