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Why are Canadians so patriotic and happy aboot (:P) promoting their country?

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Prodigy^

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 1999
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Denmark has one of the best welfare and health care systems in the world and you don't hear Danes bragging about how good their country is spite the fact that it really rocks balls.
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
67,153
3,856
126
The people in socialistically liberal countries like Denmark have no idea how well off they are because everybody is. That would be true of Canadians too except they live so close to the USA that they can more readily see how much better they have it.
 

Javelin

Senior member
Oct 13, 1999
281
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This is a tad late but... Happy Canada Day everyone. Oh, and for you Americans, its July 1st.
 

Doodoo

Golden Member
Feb 14, 2000
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Theres nothing wrong with pride. I've been to Canada and I think its great...none of the people I met have that "we're the best" mentality. Actually...the people i did hang out with were afraid of me and my friend. Me being asian and my friend being black...they thought we were gangstas or something cuz we were from NY. It was hilarious...it was fun messing with some of em. Prodigy..what does he being a "member" have to do with anything? Is he beneath you cuz he doesn't post as much as you?

 

Prodigy^

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 1999
4,044
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I included the "Member-thing" because it shows he hasn't been around on this forum as long as I have :)
 

catseye

Senior member
Jan 15, 2000
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Smart American tourists lie and say they are from Canada when being held hostage.
 

Michael

Elite member
Nov 19, 1999
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GL -The War of 1812 was more of a draw than Canada winning. England kept the US from taking any territory (with the help of native troops, both Canadians and Native Americans) but the US beat the British Navy on the Great Lakes (and won quite a few encounters on the high seas as well).

The war ended as soon as Napoleon was defeated and sent into exile (the first time, before he came back and then lost at Waterloo). The US had been expecting a quick victory while England was preoccupied. England surprised the US by sending a fair amount of regular troops quickly (after the garrison and the Canadian militias stopped them cold in their first invasion). The US realized that any victory would be very long, bloody, and not worth it for Canada once England could free up the troops it was using to fight France.

The War of 1812 was also the reason why the White House is called the White House. The British Navy sailed up to Washington, D.C. and sacked it. The President's house was whitewashed after the British troops left (they could raid, but they were not strong enough to hold territory) to cover up the stains from the smoke from burning the capitol.

I spent a fair amount of time reading up on that war a few years ago. There are not many books written on it, it was a fairly minor war.

Red Dawn - you are 100% correct. No one here can tell I'm Canadian unless I tell them. I applied for citizenship, it's taking about 2 years to process the requests these days.

Michael
 

FrogDog

Diamond Member
Jan 12, 2000
4,761
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Just to address the "aboot" issue again; I'm from Eastern Canada (Nova Scotia) and I have NEVER, EVER, heard someone say 'aboot', unless they are actually talking ABOUT and boot...I think Americans are just starting to make stuff up so they make fun of Canadians more :)
 

Michael

Elite member
Nov 19, 1999
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Frogdog - My brother went to Mount Allison U (hope I got that spelling right). A bunch of his buddies came to Montreal one spring break. A few of them used "aboot". That was the first time I had ever heard that pronouciation used. The group was from all over the place - Newfoundland (the Rock, not Labrador where I lived for a while), New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia.

I can't remember where the ones that said "aboot" came from, but I bet it is some local pronouciation that somehow became an American urban legend about Canadians.

Also, remember that we're used to Canadian pronouciations. I never thought that Canadians had any accent until I lived down in the US for a while. I can hear an accent in my sister's voice now. We may be sure that we're saying "about" but the accent may be filtering it to "aboot" to some ears.

My accent was neutral enough that most Americans assumed I was from the Midwest.

Michael
 

GL

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
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Michael,

You caught my misleading wording:) I was just teasing the Americans a bit. I never said we won, just that they lost which in effect they did because they attempted to gain territory and didn't.

Anyways, forget about Canadians bragging. You should see how much Torontonians brag about themselves within Canada:)

Doodoo - which part of Canada did you go to? I bet it wasn't Toronto because this place is so multicultural you'd be small fish in a huge pond and nobody would notice you.

-GL
 

Michael

Elite member
Nov 19, 1999
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GL - trust me, I know how much people from Toronto can brag. I'm from Montreal <grin>.

It has been very interesting to see the differences between the US and Canada. I've lived all over the place in the US over the past 10 years (NJ, Western NY, KS, CA), traveled all over the US, and have had a chance to spend a fair amount of time in Europe (just two weeks in Asia - Taipei).

I have not had any chance to visit any Communist countries, but all the &quot;free&quot; countries I visited all had their plusses. I could easily live just about anywhere I visited in Europe and like it. I really liked France (I speak French pretty well), and I also liked England and Germany.

I was fortunate to be sent all those places for work, so I spent about a month on each trip. Everywhere I went I would go shoppin gin the local stores and try and be as &quot;native&quot; as I could.

It all led me to appreciate my home country (which I am very proud of). I also really like the US and, knowing what I do now, would move down here again in a heartbeat.

Michael
 

CyberSax

Banned
Mar 12, 2000
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Not trying to insult anyone here, but...

If Canada's such a great country, why the &quot;Canadian brain drain&quot;? All of your country's top IT, medical, and finance graduates flock to the U.S., whereas, the only folks we send up North are criminals and draft dodgers :)

Perhaps Michael can answer this one :)
 

Toxin

Senior member
May 6, 2000
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cybersax

if you think about it.. why do you think there is a brain drain?.. could it be that you make more in the USA and because of currency difference and certain benefits? :)

 

blank22

Junior Member
Jun 20, 2000
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Canadians have every right to be proud of their country. I am American, and I am proud of being an American. As far as people bashing Americans, I think its ridiculous. Sure America has a sketchy past, but so does Canada, Mexico, and every other country in the world. Alot of people hate Americans because of the decisions of our politicians. Hey I voted for Clinton, but I had no idea he would get involved in the Lewinski scandal and other scandals.Did you? I didn't think so. Voters are not psychic.
As far as Canadians hating Americans, and vice-versa. Without Canada to buy our products, America would be a poor country.Same goes for Canada. We need each other to be prosperous. This is fact and can not be debated.
Does America have crooked politicians? Yes
Does Canada have crooked politicians? Yes
Does every other country in the world have crooked politicians?Yes

I think its ignorant to blame and pass judgement on a whole country full of people, for the stupid actions of some individuals.It's a shame that alot of people don't have enough common sense to figure it out. I'm not bashing anyone on this board, I'm just making a generalization.
 

chansen

Golden Member
Oct 9, 1999
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Please allow a humble Canuck to make a few less-than-humble observations:

Brain-Drain: True, many educated Canadians flock to the US, but only for higher pay. They seem to return after five years or so. Simultaneously, we welcome many other nationalities with higher edication. Truth is, we like American dollars.

Racism: Still prevalent in Toronto and Canada in general, but from conversations with many visible minorities at university, Canada is more tolerant than the US in general.

Patriotism: You just can't beat the US for good old flag waving and horn-tooting. Canadians are more subdued in their patriotic convictions, but they run just as deep. American patriotism seems so corny - so much foam hats and Abe Lincoln busts.

Beer Ad: Molson had the good fortune to name one of their beers &quot;Canadian&quot;. Of course their going to use patriotism in their ads. I like the ads far more than I like the beer, BTW.

Health Care/Social Programs: Canada is further &quot;left&quot; on this matter, having better national health care and social programs than the US - the main reason for the UN's glowing ratings.

Taxes: See Health Care/Social Programs. There is no free lunch.

Personalities: Living near Toronto, there's always a major film shoot going on, and a major star in town. Here's the catch - they don't get hounded here. Canadians respect privacy.

Humour: Yes, that's how you spell it here. We are FAR better at satirizing the US as well as ourselves. At least you have Bill Maher, or else it would be a sweep. SNL? The good one's are Canucks.

I could go on all night, but basically, I like Canada. Americans will likely say they like it there. To each their own.

Personal venting: A few requests to Americans: Adopt SI units (metric system), get better gun control and DO NOT elect George &quot;Dubya&quot; Bush. Please? We'll give you Celine Dion...


Craig
 

Prodigy^

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 1999
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I'll say, it makes no sense that the metric system hasn't cleaned the table of those ridiculous units used in the UK &amp; USA for example.
 

Michael

Elite member
Nov 19, 1999
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I moved to the US for a variety of reasons. More money helps (I live in California which is considered high taxes but I jump for joy when I see how little is taken out of my paycheque).

The US has been a place where my individual achievement is promoted and praised. When I lived in Canada, there was a strong sense of teamwork and standing out was looked down upon.

I also think the US is a place with many great people with a strong sense of freedom - not just for the US, but for everyone. Sure, I've met more than my fair share of the stereotypical &quot;dumb Americans&quot;, but I've met far more that are a credit to their country.

I know that most of my close friends have moved to the US and have no plans to move back. I was the first, but many of them have followed. I'd love to see backing for the 5 year theory.

I'm not even going to try to argue that the US is perfect. Where I grew up, people lived wherever. Most places in the US are divided by colour. There also are areas of appalling poverty. In the end, I like it here enough to apply to be a citizen.

Michael

ps - I love Canada (and Quebec). The French heritage that I grew up with is treasured by me. I get to have the best of both worlds and my daughter will be a Canadian citizen as well.
 

Javelin

Senior member
Oct 13, 1999
281
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Just thought I should mention it since people are talking about brain drain... a professor that I know well at UBC is an expert in this area, and his studies show that brain drain is actually decreasing and has done so every decade since WWII. There is a lot of anecdotal &quot;evidence&quot; about brain drain, but when you actually crunch the numbers, its a much smaller problem than its made out to be and shrinking all the time.
 
Jan 30, 2000
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When my husband I were talking about getting married (I'm an American, he's Canadian), we talked seriously about which country we wanted to live in. He's from rural New Brunswick, which I fell in love with when I was there, but in terms of job opportunities, there wasn't anything there I could do. I could work in the factory or commute an hour and a half one way to work in Saint John. In the end we decided on him coming here, and he's amazed by how little taxes are taken out of his paycheck, and how low our sales tax is and stuff. He has a great job with Lucent, making more in a week than he did intwo up there. We'd move back to Canada in a heartbeat, if we could afford it, but our incomes will go much further here.
 

DABANSHEE

Banned
Dec 8, 1999
2,355
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Canadians keep on going on about 'I am Canadian' (sewing Canadian flags on their backpacks) because they are paranoid about being mistaken for Americans. Its a insecurity thing because of cultural imperialism coming across the 49th parrallel - there's no real homogenous Canadian culture left, except of the French Canadians &amp; their how you say it - que-be-qua (which just pisses off the Anglo Canadians even more) &amp; the Newfoundlanders who still think they are Irish, maybe because they have only been a part of Canada, postwar. I spose all those jokes about being the 51st state just rub them up the wrong way.:):):)

I wonder if Teddy Ruxpin, will now pop out of whatever rock he's hiding under &amp; reply with something disparaging about us Aussies.:)
 

GL

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
4,547
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<sigh>Dabanshee,

I once thought that Canada had no culture. Then I got out of the house and simply went around Toronto. Whereas the U.S. is a melting pot, Canada is potluck of cultures especially in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal. It is a country where you don't have to stop celebrating your past traditions, or even stop saying that you're Italian, or Irish, or African or Chinese, or any other race. It's a huge difference. Slowly but surely, there is an intermingling of cultures that will one day be viewed as &quot;Canadian culture&quot;.

My mom is Irish, my dad is Filipino. My brother married a Trinidadian girl, my sister is going out with a Barbadian guy. I'm going out with a girl with a British father and Filipino mother. My whole family is this crazy intermingling of cultures. What made this possible was Canada...it's where everybody met and where everybody felt free enough to live the way they wanted to.

I'd say that Canada is tremendously tolerant of diversity. It isn't necessarily accepting, but the tolerance is unmatched by any other country in the world and I'd challenge any person that doubts my observation to come and see for yourself.

So you'd be right in saying Canada doesn't have an original culture. I'd say ours' has its roots in dozens of cultures the world over and will eventually form its own culture in the next century.

-GL
 

RSI

Diamond Member
May 22, 2000
7,281
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<< hehe that &quot;aboot&quot; thing is something the Eastern Canadians say, I believe >>

You have no idea what you're talking about.. it's funny how alot of Americans seem to think we say &quot;aboot&quot;, but no Canadians do! I'm also from Eastern Canada (Montreal, Quebec) and I never have said it &quot;aboot&quot;, and have never ever heard any Canadian say that.

It's crap.

-RSI
Canada kicks ass... :)
 

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