who is wrenching today?

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JCH13

Diamond Member
Sep 14, 2010
4,981
66
91
Those are all bolt on bits. No big deal.

Definitely make friends with a group of local car guys to help you learn. A car to practice on helps, even if it's someone elses and you just help. Ideally you make freinds with someone who has a garage with tools to see what sort if things you actually use.

There are plenty of people in atg willing to help, like jlee, fuzzydunlop, black2na, and myself. Just ask!
 

JCH13

Diamond Member
Sep 14, 2010
4,981
66
91
Those FM Hub Stands are pretty cool. Sadly out of my budget for my needs anyways. I just wanted a quick measurement of my camber now to see if its changed since i moved my camber arm a little bit.


Yea thats very weird to have cotter pins and not have it tighten. That would of been very deadly, least the have you.

They are pretty cool! I got a couple friends to chip in $80/ea (cost of an alignment) to help me buy them with the deal that they get to use them when needed. Works out for everyone.

And yar, very weird. I am glad I caught that nonsense and no one was hurt. It's all too easy for one bolt or nut to come loose and be VERY dangerous.
 

FuzzyDunlop

Diamond Member
Jan 30, 2008
3,261
12
81
Those are all bolt on bits. No big deal.

Definitely make friends with a group of local car guys to help you learn. A car to practice on helps, even if it's someone elses and you just help. Ideally you make freinds with someone who has a garage with tools to see what sort if things you actually use.

There are plenty of people in atg willing to help, like jlee, fuzzydunlop, black2na, and myself. Just ask!

first step should be to find the factory service manual, or Haynes book for the vehicle you want to repair. It'll cover everything from simple fluid changes to engine rebuild. And like was stated before... start with simple things to build confidence.
 

JCH13

Diamond Member
Sep 14, 2010
4,981
66
91
first step should be to find the factory service manual, or Haynes book for the vehicle you want to repair. It'll cover everything from simple fluid changes to engine rebuild. And like was stated before... start with simple things to build confidence.

Indeed. It will also list those ever important torque specs!
 

skyking

Lifer
Nov 21, 2001
22,004
4,760
146
yah, but really. I rarely torque things like that bolt in the story, and my eyeballs can tell a 65 ft/lb bolt from a 15 ft/lb bolt. That was bizarre.
 

exdeath

Lifer
Jan 29, 2004
13,679
10
81
Cobra:

-rebuilt differential with new bearings, seals, LSD clutches, etc. Carrier bearing was bad, but did everything since metal contamination from bearing matter. Total time 5 hours

wqNpjmiJqKNyHKVBtb3nM8XKNafsilRSR1LcV9mHM9c


Oo3iDPy7O2bzmL9Lb4XBAxZN2Hdmiqif3U7QQoOatO4


-replaced intercooler pump, brushes were shot

KNSQquGRdR_jVrcYQteCfi0VG9CwDqKKkAm3fzFBgdY


FCVFWlNakCpsPcBYFLBN1kEqyothVG7TagHqqRGejpA


MR2: Helped JLee finish his engine build and re-installation

http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?t=2127356&page=34
 

skyking

Lifer
Nov 21, 2001
22,004
4,760
146
Intercooler pump threw me off for a second, all I deal with are air-to-air in the diesel rigs.
Was the diff noisy?
 

exdeath

Lifer
Jan 29, 2004
13,679
10
81
Intercooler pump threw me off for a second, all I deal with are air-to-air in the diesel rigs.
Was the diff noisy?

accel whir whir whir whir whir whir whir whir decel wwwhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhrrrrrrr


Yeah...

I let it go for a long time for two reasons:

a) car is noisy anyway with it's beefy drive train, so it had to get worse and worse to finally notice

b) I knew I would replace ALL of the bearings, LSD clutches, seals, etc, due to the oil being full of metal, so no matter how bad I let it go it wasn't going to hurt anything else. New pinion bearings and seals, crush sleeve, carrier bearings, carbon fiber traction lok clutches, axle stub pilot bearings, axle seals, etc. Thoroughly cleaned carrier housing, ring and pinion gears, diff housing, etc till shiny. Refilled with 1.5 qts Royal Purple 75w140 + additional 4 oz Motorcraft friction modifier. Quiet as a sleeping baby now.



Yeah intercooler pump is just a Bosch 12v water pump.

I thought the connector was bad pump side because it would change pitch and work/not work when I wiggled it but when I took it apart and looked inside expecting a bad solder joint, I saw almost gone brushes and the entire inside (sealed with giant orange oring) was caked in massive amounts of carbon dust. Was getting intermittent bogging when it was hot = IAT2 too high and ECU kills timing. Finally got tired of it enough to pull the bumper.

Just now changed oil, new Motorcraft FL820S OEM filter and 7 quarts Amsoil 5w20 signature and emptied the PCV catch can.

Nothing else left to do, feels good.

Took Thus and Fri off for a 4 day weekend of MR2 cleanup and tuning in Phx with JLee.
 
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JCH13

Diamond Member
Sep 14, 2010
4,981
66
91
yah, but really. I rarely torque things like that bolt in the story, and my eyeballs can tell a 65 ft/lb bolt from a 15 ft/lb bolt. That was bizarre.

I don't disagree with you here. A lot of stuff I do 'by feel' on my own cars. But on someone else's that I've never worked on before I always get the torque spec.

There are a lot of not-too-bright people out there...
 

exdeath

Lifer
Jan 29, 2004
13,679
10
81
I usually do torque specs when convenient (or critical precision parts like long block assembly), but having broken many bolts and stripped many threads before the torque wrench clicks, I just go with common sense and feel. I've broken less things torqing by hand than waiting on a click that never comes, even using lubed and clean fasteners and a wrench with the desired torque spec in the middle of the scale.

Aluminum stuff gets hand tighten + a tiny bit of snug after its tight, sometimes using one hand close up to the 3/8 ratchet head.

Steel/iron like massive suspension parts I will crank down on it with both hands and a decent size 1/2 ratchet after hand threading and tightening.

Axle nuts and things that are 200+ ft lbs Ill just beat the shit out of it with an impact.

Things like diff covers, wheels, engine assemblies, bearing preload etc always get a torque wrench.
 
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olds

Elite Member
Mar 3, 2000
50,053
710
126
I am wrenching today for 5 minutes. Putting a new headlight on my motorcycle.

Wrenching on my truck Saturday. New speakers and an amp.
 

JCH13

Diamond Member
Sep 14, 2010
4,981
66
91
It's worth noting that when using oil/antiseize/grease or whatever on a bolt/nut you should de-rate the torque by ~35%. Unless, of course, and manual specifies that the bolt/nut/stud should be lubed, like a head stud.

Lubricating the threads reduces the frictional component of turning the fastener and thus increases tension in the fastener for a given torque. Perfect example of this was Black2NA setting a wheel stud. With dry threads the stud wouldn't seat using his impact gun. He added some engine oil to the threads and was then able to seat the stud with the same impact gun.

Also, torque wrenches always go on the nut, if there is one of course.
 

exdeath

Lifer
Jan 29, 2004
13,679
10
81
It's worth noting that when using oil/antiseize/grease or whatever on a bolt/nut you should de-rate the torque by ~35%. Unless, of course, and manual specifies that the bolt/nut/stud should be lubed, like a head stud.

Lubricating the threads reduces the frictional component of turning the fastener and thus increases tension in the fastener for a given torque. Perfect example of this was Black2NA setting a wheel stud. With dry threads the stud wouldn't seat using his impact gun. He added some engine oil to the threads and was then able to seat the stud with the same impact gun.

Also, torque wrenches always go on the nut, if there is one of course.

Yup.

Snapped a stud on a strut torquing the nuts to spec dry. Twice. It wasn't even 30 ft lbs. Stopped using that wrench after that. Just snug until the gasket compresses and the two parts bottom out. Then wrap my thumb on the forward bottom side and give it a good 1/4 turn to finish it.

Fronts I had no issues they were much larger studs. Certain things I can see to be fragile like cast aluminium intake manifolds Ill get tight enough to seal the gasket and bottom out the parts, give it one good tug to lock in the fastener, and leave it. I don't trust torque wrenches for stuff like that anymore. At least not the ones normal people can afford (eg does not have a torque controller computer and umbilical)
 
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JCH13

Diamond Member
Sep 14, 2010
4,981
66
91
Yup.

Snapped a stud on a strut torquing the nuts to spec dry. Twice. It wasn't even 30 ft lbs. Stopped using that wrench after that. Just snug until the gasket compresses and the two parts bottom out. Then wrap my thumb on the forward bottom side and give it a good 1/4 turn to finish it.

Fronts I had no issues they were much larger studs. Certain things I can see to be fragile like cast aluminium intake manifolds Ill get tight enough to seal the gasket and bottom out the parts, give it one good tug to lock in the fastener, and leave it. I don't trust torque wrenches for stuff like that anymore. At least not the ones normal people can afford (eg does not have a torque controller computer and umbilical)

I've had very good luck with my Craftsman torque wrenches. When used properly I don't think I've had anything break. This is including one I've been using in a bromine-rich environment for over 10 months at work.

I do some weird stuff for work.
 

thomsbrain

Lifer
Dec 4, 2001
18,148
1
0
The Accord got oil and transmission fluid. The S2000 got oil, stainless brake lines, a brake fluid flush, and a new Shorai Li-Fe starter battery (5 pounds!!!!).
 

bamx2

Senior member
Oct 25, 2004
483
1
81
AC clutch bearing went out on my minimally drivr weekend hauler 1994 Ford F250 truck. I hope I can just replace it with used one from the junkyard .

Edit- It turned out to be sheared AC compressor pulley . I tried turning the compressor and it a tight spot . I then evacuated the system and removed it. After removing it I noticed that it was not tight anymore, no debris or dark color in the ports or oil . Howver ,it is obvious that there is clog (and something causing it) . I will have to find the right tool to pull the orifice . I the mean time, I need to use the truck and ac is not that important so I will get another compressor or clutch with pulley . I will put on the belt I can get it back on the road and just not charge it or connect the harness.


After that, work to do on other my daily driver change and cabin filters.
 
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CurseTheSky

Diamond Member
Oct 21, 2006
5,401
2
0
I usually do torque specs when convenient (or critical precision parts like long block assembly), but having broken many bolts and stripped many threads before the torque wrench clicks, I just go with common sense and feel. I've broken less things torqing by hand than waiting on a click that never comes, even using lubed and clean fasteners and a wrench with the desired torque spec in the middle of the scale.

Aluminum stuff gets hand tighten + a tiny bit of snug after its tight, sometimes using one hand close up to the 3/8 ratchet head.

Steel/iron like massive suspension parts I will crank down on it with both hands and a decent size 1/2 ratchet after hand threading and tightening.

Axle nuts and things that are 200+ ft lbs Ill just beat the shit out of it with an impact.

Things like diff covers, wheels, engine assemblies, bearing preload etc always get a torque wrench.

Jesus Christ, this.

I'm so sick of trying to loosen something that the previous person overtightened. Having a bolt stuck on after 2+ years of use and corrosion is expected, but having it stuck on literally a couple of days after the other person tightened it down is infuriating.

My dad is the worst offender. :p Cars aren't even the worst part. Pickle jars end up tighter than when they were first opened. :mad:
 

jlee

Lifer
Sep 12, 2001
48,511
219
106
Oil change to Amsoil Signature 0w30, four new spark plugs, and a compression test last night. Happy engine is happy. :)
 

Viperoni

Lifer
Jan 4, 2000
11,084
1
71
Replaced the front pads on my dads car with Akebono ceramic's. Very happy with these on my car and I know he will be too.

Also swapped out the front tire on my bike with another one - hope it works well on the trail tomorrow!
 

bamx2

Senior member
Oct 25, 2004
483
1
81
Weekend - 2001 Honda Odyssey timing belt (Honda / Acura J35 V6).

This is not the first TB job for me but I anticipate it taking a full day.

I am not planning to change the cam /crank seals if they don't appear to be leaking.

I will also be replacing the spark plugs .



FWIW-

I have the crank pulley holding tool.

The TB kit purchased included a Gates (japan) TB , NPW (Japan) WP, 1 GMB "dogbone" tensioner(Japan ?) and 1 KOYO (Japan) tensioner/idler and a Honda brand hydraulic tensioner, Bando accessory belts , crank and cam seals.


Good references for the project here - http://tl.acurazine.com/forums/showthread.php?t=695821 , forums at www.odyclub.com and some youtube videos searching "Honda V6 timing belt", "Odyessy timing belt")
 
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skyking

Lifer
Nov 21, 2001
22,004
4,760
146
I have the wife's car on the lift next door. It needed an oil change and I had some symptoms to look at.
It needs some control arm bushings and a rear hub/bearing assembly.
I an installing a quick change oil drain valve and cutting in a door so I can leave the belly pan on for subsequent oil changes.
 

Eos

Diamond Member
Jun 14, 2000
3,473
16
81
I have the wife's car on the lift next door. It needed an oil change and I had some symptoms to look at.
It needs some control arm bushings and a rear hub/bearing assembly.
I an installing a quick change oil drain valve and cutting in a door so I can leave the belly pan on for subsequent oil changes.

I love mine. Fumoto? Installed one on each car. I've never had such a clean oil change process.
 
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skyking

Lifer
Nov 21, 2001
22,004
4,760
146
Fumoto :)
I have a matched pair of TDI beetles, with a belly pan between me and the oil change. This will make it much nicer. I will fab a door and cut a hole in the belly pan.
My truck has a 3/8" square drive plug straight down so it won't get a fumoto, way too easy to snag on something and not really that bad to do. I just stick a 3" extension on the ratchet.
 

deadken

Diamond Member
Aug 8, 2004
3,193
2
81
I started replacing the speakers on my daughters 1998 Ford Contour. Only got one installed before she took the car to visit her friend (she goes back to school in VA next weekend). I bought that Contour with 7,9XX miles on it and she already has cracked the 9k mark in the month that she's been home. My co-workers father-in-law owned it and he recently passed away. A 15 year old car with less than 8 thousand miles on it for $1k. The tires, battery, and oil change were done within the last year. Perfect car for my daughter, 4-cylinder, ABS, A/C, PW, PL, PS, Auto, etc....

I did have the local shop change the oil again (8,9xx when the change sticker reads 10,5xx). I asked them to give it a good looking over since I don't have access to a lift anymore. Nothing found, so I'm confident for her trip. I was concerned about the coil springs after my co-worker I bought it from talked about an occasional noise. I looked up recalls for that car and saw that Ford would change any broken coil springs for the first 10 years. Well, no broken coils. Not that they would have been covered, just wondering what that noise he spoke of is. I've never heard it.
 

skyking

Lifer
Nov 21, 2001
22,004
4,760
146
The VWs have a vulnerable cast aluminum oil pan. I have a couple of them and did not want to drop 500-plus to buy the fancy aluminum skid plates.
I had a local metal works shop shear me some 1/8" steel to size for $30 for both cars, and welded up and installed the pan guard on my wife's car yesterday. I picked up a couple of bell housing bolts, and made some struts to reach the cast iron block.
It will take and disperse a pretty good hit while protecting the vitals.
panguard_zps57f47a06.jpg


Green was all I had for paint :D
 
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