Who has an R5 2400G or R3 2200G Office Machine

Ratman6161

Senior member
Mar 21, 2008
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#1
I'm getting ready to build a new machine for my wife. there will be no gaming on this system...0...so don't care about gaming in the slightest. It will be used for MS Office, email, web browsing etc. Right now she's using a Gigabyte Brix with an i3-3220u (1.9 Ghz ultra low power mobile i3 about 5 generations old).

So I was initially intrigued by the i3-8100 as it looks like it should perform about on par with an i5 from the 7xxx generation. Price is quite good at $109.99 at Microcenter. Onboard graphics on the i3 are "good enough" for her usage. Problem though is that there are no entry level motherboards available for it yet so to build one now, I'd have to over spend by a lot on the motherboard. Of course I could just wait but her old system really isn't cutting it for her any more so I'd like to build in the next month.

The 2200G and the 2400G look kind of attractive. But the vega graphics are overkill for the purpose and CPU wise the 2400G looks pretty similar to what I'd expect from the i3-8100. I would not be buying a separate graphics card with either one so overall, if there were a comparably priced motherboard for the I3-8100 it would be a bit cheaper build overall. Factor in the motherboard situation though and I could build the 2400G for less and the 2200G for noticeably less.

So the options are:
1. Wait and build an 8100
2. 2400G now
3. 2200G now.

who is running 1 and 2 now and what do you think of it for non-gaming purposes. Most of the discussions I find revolve around gaming which is of no interest to me.
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
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#2
I would vote prebuilt.
 
Aug 25, 2001
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#3
If I hadn't *ahem* spent my spare money on other parts *G4560 and mobos*, I would have a 2200G, or possibly a 2400G, to test out. As it is, unless I sell some parts online, I won't have the spare money for one yet.

I really want to "play" with one. Thinking of retro-fitting my AB350M Pro4 boards with 16GB of DDR4-3000 Team Vulcan RAM with 2400Gs, and ditching the dGPUs. Also want to add some decent PCI-E M.2 NVMe SSDs. The Adata 512GB are $159.99 I think for the SX7000 w/heatsink.
 
Mar 20, 2017
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#4
The 2200G should be slightly slower than the 8100 from the synthetic benchmarks I've seen. Both of them are 4c/4t and have very similar per thread performance.

If you're willing to slap the 2200G into a cheap B350 board and do a slight overclock with the stock cooler, I would guess it will perform practically the same as the 8100.
 

Ratman6161

Senior member
Mar 21, 2008
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#5
I would vote prebuilt.
I'm looking around at pre-built systems but so far not finding anything that strikes my fancy. That's partly because I'm specifically looking at a mini-itx build. As an example, I'm seeing a Lenovo mini-tower with an R5 1400 CPU, 8 GB RAM and a 1 TB spinning disk for $600. Its not really what I want from a form factor perspective and I would have to add an SSD to it. I'd probably bring over the 240 GB ssd from the old machine. HP also has a similar machine for around $700.

On the other hand, for a Mini-ITX case, power supply, motherboard, 8GB RAM and an R5 2400G CPU (roughly equivalent to the 1400 in the Lenovo) and also bringing over the SSD and 500 GB disk drive from the old system is $446 on the wish list I built on New Egg. I could subtract $70 from that if I went with the 2200G instead of t6he 2400G. Of course the i3-8100 is about $60 cheaper than the 2400G so if anyone comes out with an inexpensive MB for that in the near future, that would be a cheap option.

I guess I will keep looking for pre-built systems in this performance range but they would have to be no more than $450 to be worth it.
 

Ratman6161

Senior member
Mar 21, 2008
607
0
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#6
The 2200G should be slightly slower than the 8100 from the synthetic benchmarks I've seen. Both of them are 4c/4t and have very similar per thread performance.

If you're willing to slap the 2200G into a cheap B350 board and do a slight overclock with the stock cooler, I would guess it will perform practically the same as the 8100.
I'm not at all averse to overclocking. My main system is an R51600 on a B350 board @ 3.85 Ghz. I recycled an AIO water cooler I already had when building that system, so I still have the wraith spire cooler that came with the 1600 which would be an upgrade on a 2200G or 2400G. I'm looking around for OC test results on the 2200 G if anyone has seen any?

PS: I'm looking at Mini-ITX so even the B350's aren't quite as cheap as with ATX. The one I'm looking at is an Asrock fatality for $107
 
Jan 29, 2014
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#7
I recently built the following for my nephew. He will be using it purely for homework and videos (including 4k). The 2200g is a really sweet processor for the price and I enjoyed building this so much I have an itch to do another for my living room. Prices are what I paid (varies now). I hope I'm not violating forum rules by posting prices and parts list in this section.

Ryzen 2200g ($99 Amazon)
Noctua NH-L9A-AM4 ($39 Newegg) - necessary for cooling in the Node 202
Gigabyte AB350N ITX ($99 Amazon) - you can go ~$30 cheaper with a mATX B350 from Asrock along with a cheaper mATX case if you need to save here.
Team Vulcan 8gb (2x4gb) DDR4-3000 ($97 Outlet PC) - could do DDR4-2400 but you only save $5-10
Samsung SSD 750 120gb ($40 Craigslist)
Western Digital Green 2TB ($40 Craigslist)
Fractal Design Node 202 ($70 Amazon)
Silverstone ST45SF 450w Bronze ($60 Amazon) - headroom for GPU later if desired
Windows 10 Home OEM ($90 Outlet PC)

Total: $634 Keyboard, mouse, and monitor already available to nephew. Don't take this as a strict recommendation, you can do much cheaper if needed. But it's a good reference.

You mentioned, correctly, that the i3-8100 is a tough sell without available cheaper mATX/ITX boards. They're all Z370 currently (although The H and B boards are releasing right now).

I don't think the 2400g is necessary for an office PC, unless you do production work that could use the extra four threads.
 
Last edited:
Aug 25, 2001
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#8
Interesting that you chose "Team Vulcan DDR4-3000" RAM. I have some 16GB kits of that RAM, and in my AB350M Pro4 boards with 1600 CPUs, I couldn't get them to run stable at anything above 2667, which had to be manually entered, because XMP would default to 2933, and that wouldn't even POST. 2800 sort of worked, it would POST like 30% of the time, but inside Windows 10, it would cause appcrashes on intensive programs.
 

majord

Senior member
Jul 26, 2015
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#9
2200g+ A320 board
 

alexruiz

Platinum Member
Sep 21, 2001
2,481
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#10
Interesting that you chose "Team Vulcan DDR4-3000" RAM. I have some 16GB kits of that RAM, and in my AB350M Pro4 boards with 1600 CPUs, I couldn't get them to run stable at anything above 2667, which had to be manually entered, because XMP would default to 2933, and that wouldn't even POST. 2800 sort of worked, it would POST like 30% of the time, but inside Windows 10, it would cause appcrashes on intensive programs.
What BIOS version?
I am running team vulcan and team dark ddr4-3000 on AB350 Pro4 4.50 and AB350 Fatal1ty Gaming K4 3.30... they have taken it without complaint.
 

XavierMace

Diamond Member
Apr 20, 2013
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#11
After replacing the Asrock Fatal1ty ITX board with the similar Gigabyte, I'm quite happy with the 2200g I put in the HTPC.
 
Aug 25, 2001
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#12
I think that I have Team Dark DDR4-2400 in this particular box, also with an AB350M Pro4, and a Ryzen 1600 CPU. It won't boot windows at all with any of the "Raven Ridge" UEFI versions (anything newer than 3.40).
 
Jan 29, 2014
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#13
Interesting that you chose "Team Vulcan DDR4-3000" RAM. I have some 16GB kits of that RAM, and in my AB350M Pro4 boards with 1600 CPUs, I couldn't get them to run stable at anything above 2667, which had to be manually entered, because XMP would default to 2933, and that wouldn't even POST. 2800 sort of worked, it would POST like 30% of the time, but inside Windows 10, it would cause appcrashes on intensive programs.
The Gigabyte BIOS displayed a 3000mhz CL16 XMP option right away on the F22b version. Flashed it with my R7 1700.
 
Aug 11, 2008
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#14
If the machine is for business type applications, I would not overclock. Dont think for Office apps, web browsing, etc. you would need it. IMO, 2200 is a better value than the 2400 and should be sufficient. Even a pre-built with a hyperthreaded pentium should be enough. Also, when you costed out a DIY system, did you include the OS, or do you have a license? If you have to buy windows too, I think it would be hard to beat a pre-built.
 
Jan 29, 2014
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#16
I no overclocking on the A320 is there? I was assuming I'd do a mild overclock on it,
It seems like on most A320 boards you can use memory XMP but you can't change the CPU or iGPU clocks/voltage. I only chose the B350 ITX on my recent build because there are no A320 ITX boards.
 

Ratman6161

Senior member
Mar 21, 2008
607
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#17
If the machine is for business type applications, I would not overclock. Dont think for Office apps, web browsing, etc. you would need it. IMO, 2200 is a better value than the 2400 and should be sufficient. Even a pre-built with a hyperthreaded pentium should be enough. Also, when you costed out a DIY system, did you include the OS, or do you have a license? If you have to buy windows too, I think it would be hard to beat a pre-built.
well, need to OC...no..but want to? Yes! On the windows license its a good point but it just so happens I have a transferable retail license on the old system.

I too want to do a mini itx build so currently b350 seems like the least exo4nsive available option.
 
Last edited:
Aug 25, 2001
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#19
I built an i3-8100 ITX rig. I wasn't heavily impressed, especially since it's not unlocked, and not overclockable. Also not the hugest fan of Intel's iGPU, although it's fine for 4K UHD desktop usage and media-decoding. IF you're running dual-channel RAM.
 

Ranulf

Golden Member
Jul 18, 2001
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#20
NE has a couple of combos with the 2200/2400 and itx boards. Only upside I see to the z370 itx board is dual nics and 6 sata ports over 4. Hell they have a biostar itx x370 for $107.
 

Ratman6161

Senior member
Mar 21, 2008
607
0
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#22
How is that relevant if you're just building an office machine?
The only reason I have a Z370 board under consideration is that there are no entry level motherboards out yet (that I can find anyway) that would support the 8th Gen i3. But its not as much of a disadvantage in the Mini-ITX form factor because the AMD motherboards in that form factor tend to cost more too. The cheapest Mini-ITX board on New Egg is $104 so my desire for Mini-ITX partially offsets the usual AMD advantage in total platform cost. If I decided to go up in size to a Micro-ATX I could cut at least $30 off the motherboard price.

So no, the dual nics etc on the z370 don't really mean anything to me. It just so happens that that's what I would need to get to use the i3.

All this is why the i3 configuration is the middle priced among my three options.
 

Ratman6161

Senior member
Mar 21, 2008
607
0
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#23
I built an i3-8100 ITX rig. I wasn't heavily impressed, especially since it's not unlocked, and not overclockable. Also not the hugest fan of Intel's iGPU, although it's fine for 4K UHD desktop usage and media-decoding. IF you're running dual-channel RAM.
Seems to me like a 2200g would need the overclock to keep up with the i3-8100 cpu wise. The Intel graphics are "good enough" for my purposes. I wouldn't buy something for myself that I couldn't overclock. But building for my wife, that's not such a concern. On the other hand, my 2200G configuration is $47 cheaper so if a mild overclock would make it as good as the 8100 I'm not against that. Of course anything I build will have dual channel RAM. I'm looking at the same RAM for all three configurations.
 

Ratman6161

Senior member
Mar 21, 2008
607
0
91
#24
Thanks all for the replies. I'm not in a big hurry and will probably order my components in a month or so. Right now the 2200G configuration is my first pick because its the lowest cost and seems to get the job done. The ability to do a mild overclock also satisfies my compulsion to tinker and my inability to leave well enough alone :).
 

Shivansps

Platinum Member
Sep 11, 2013
2,408
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#25
For office use there is no need for big igpu or even 4/4, early last year we upgraded all our pcs (mostly 2nd gen SB, Phenoms and some AM1) to G4560s with H110 DDR3 boards so we could re-use almost every one of our ram sticks, and cheap 120GB ssds, people are happy with that and there is really no need for anything more in a long time.
 


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