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Question Which of the 6 Framesync Options cover both AMD and Nvidia cards???

Caveman

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Nov 18, 1999
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I want to buy a "future proof" monitor. The monitor must be capable of framesyncing regardless of what video card I use in the future (AMD or Nvidia).

Looking on partspicker.com I see the following options:

Framesync.JPG

Which of these techs is guaranteed to work with both AMD and Nvidia cards?
 

Stuka87

Diamond Member
Dec 10, 2010
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FreeSync and G-Sync Compatible are the same thing. They work for both cards.

FreeSync Premium and Premium Pro don't actually change anything with FreeSync itself. Instead its a certification for monitors based on their capabilities. Such as refresh rate range, HDR support, color support, etc.

Basically a Premium Pro monitor will be at the upper end of quality and features that also has FreeSync support.

My monitor is a Premium Pro, and it also comes with custom calibrations built into the monitor. But I am not sure if thats something they all have, or just my particular model.
 
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Mopetar

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Nvidia has essentially given up on G-Sync and their newer cards support FreeSync, but should still work with G-Sync monitors.

If you want the option of using an AMD card then don't bug G-Sync. I don't know if former G-Sync only monitors can get an update to enable FreeSync or not, but either get a newer FreeSync display (I don't know if Nvidia has support for every single one of them or not) or a display that advertises itself as both.
 

Caveman

Platinum Member
Nov 18, 1999
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Thanks so much guys but I believe the variance in answers is interesting... I was unaware before this morning that there are actually now 6 types of freesync out there...

Stuka, I read your response is all freesync monitors can sync an Nvidia card but a gsync cannot be assumed to run an AMD card unless it is deemed "compatible"...
 
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nurturedhate

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Aug 27, 2011
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Thanks so much guys but I believe the variance in answers is interesting... I was unaware before this morning that there are actually now 6 types of freesync out there...

Stuka, I read your response is all freesync monitors can sync an Nvidia card but a gsync cannot be assumed to run an AMD card unless it is deemed "compatible"...
All gsync monitors should work w/ Nvidia cards.
All freesync monitors should work w/ AMD cards.
Most newer freesync monitors should work w/ Nvidia cards.

Gsync was Nvidia's proprietary sync solution, most sync monitors should be freesync currently.
 
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Leeea

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Apr 3, 2020
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All gsync monitors should work w/ Nvidia cards.
All freesync monitors should work w/ AMD cards.
Most newer freesync monitors should work w/ Nvidia cards.

Gsync was Nvidia's proprietary sync solution, most sync monitors should be freesync currently.
NurturedHate nailed it.

The only thing I would add is some newer freesync monitors are certified to work with Nvidia. Some older freesync monitors (like mine) work just fine with gsync.

The fastest way to tell if a free sync monitor is compatible is to punch into the internet "model number gsync compatible". Nvidia cannot quite bring itself to say free sync, so it calls it "gsync compatible".

Lastly, ironically "gsync compatible" is frequently better then gsync, as it will frequently go down to 20 fps. ( including on my old monitor much to my surprise)

. . .

I was researching this quite recently, because I wanted to check if I could get my hands on a 3080, it would work with my old monitor ( C32HG70 - it is ok, but my next is an oled ).
 
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Dribble

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Aug 9, 2005
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Gysnc compatible is what you want as that will also be freesync. It also means it's been tested by nvidia and passes a minimum stamp of quality which is significantly higher then just "freesync".
 

Stuka87

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Dec 10, 2010
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Gysnc compatible is what you want as that will also be freesync. It also means it's been tested by nvidia and passes a minimum stamp of quality which is significantly higher then just "freesync".
Saying 'GSync Compatible' is "significantly better than freesync" is a bit disingenuous. Its not like nVidia has some super high standards for GSync Compatible (see chart below). They literally came up with it so that they could retain the marketing for GSync, while also accepting defeat for their proprietary add-on module.


Below you can see the differences (Chart is from here: https://www.tomshardware.com/features/gsync-vs-freesync-nvidia-amd-monitor )

FreeSyncFreeSync PremiumFreeSync Premium ProG-SyncG-Sync UltimateG-Sync Compatibility
No price premiumNo price premiumNo price premiumHDR and extended color supportRefresh rates of 144 Hz and higherValidated for artifact-free performance
Refresh rates of 60 Hz and higherRefresh rates of 120 Hz and higherRefresh rates of 120 Hz and higherFrame-doubling below 30 Hz to ensure Adaptive-Sync at all frame ratesHDR and extended color support with tone mappingMany G-Sync Compatible monitors can also run FreeSync
Many FreeSync monitors can also run G-SyncLow Framerate Compensation (LFC)HDR and extended color supportUltra-low motion blurMinimum 1,000 nits max brightness
May have HDR supportMay have HDR support (Many FreeSync Premium monitors can also run G-Sync with HDR)Low Framerate Compensation (LFC)Ultra-low motion blur
No specified peak output, but most will deliver at least 600 nits
Many FreeSync Premium Pro monitors can also run G-Sync with HDR

GSync Compatible is just a way of saying "yes, this monitor works with nVidia video cards". Nothing in the certification brings up display quality or specs. G-Sync Ultimate is the one that goes into display performance. But it is not cross platform compatible.
 

Leeea

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Apr 3, 2020
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That chart is not right.

My monitor specifically supports "Freesync 2 HDR", and goes into that mode. A game I have been playing recently, Division 2, also specifically outputs "Freesync 2 HDR", "Freesync", and "10bit HDR" as different free sync standards.

----------

edit: your chart is right!

Freesync 2 HDR was turned into FreeSync Premium Pro
 
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Dribble

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Aug 9, 2005
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Saying 'GSync Compatible' is "significantly better than freesync" is a bit disingenuous. Its not like nVidia has some super high standards for GSync Compatible (see chart below). They literally came up with it so that they could retain the marketing for GSync, while also accepting defeat for their proprietary add-on module.


Below you can see the differences (Chart is from here: https://www.tomshardware.com/features/gsync-vs-freesync-nvidia-amd-monitor )

FreeSyncFreeSync PremiumFreeSync Premium ProG-SyncG-Sync UltimateG-Sync Compatibility
No price premiumNo price premiumNo price premiumHDR and extended color supportRefresh rates of 144 Hz and higherValidated for artifact-free performance
Refresh rates of 60 Hz and higherRefresh rates of 120 Hz and higherRefresh rates of 120 Hz and higherFrame-doubling below 30 Hz to ensure Adaptive-Sync at all frame ratesHDR and extended color support with tone mappingMany G-Sync Compatible monitors can also run FreeSync
Many FreeSync monitors can also run G-SyncLow Framerate Compensation (LFC)HDR and extended color supportUltra-low motion blurMinimum 1,000 nits max brightness
May have HDR supportMay have HDR support (Many FreeSync Premium monitors can also run G-Sync with HDR)Low Framerate Compensation (LFC)Ultra-low motion blur
No specified peak output, but most will deliver at least 600 nits
Many FreeSync Premium Pro monitors can also run G-Sync with HDR

GSync Compatible is just a way of saying "yes, this monitor works with nVidia video cards". Nothing in the certification brings up display quality or specs. G-Sync Ultimate is the one that goes into display performance. But it is not cross platform compatible.
You are wrong Freesync alone is no guarantee of anything - it can be basically useless and have a freesync range between 80 and 100 htz and that's it and you can call it Freesync. Gsync compatible is a significantly higher standard then freesync alone. It has to have a full 2.5* range with LFC (basically it's a free sync display that will run as well as original gsync). Nvidia when they adopted freesync meant for the first time ever someone was enforcing a sensible minimum standard.
Hence if you are buying a monitor buy gsync compatible as you know it's been tested by a 3rd party (Nvidia) and hence is going to work properly.
 

maddogmcgee

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Apr 20, 2015
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You are wrong Freesync alone is no guarantee of anything - it can be basically useless and have a freesync range between 80 and 100 htz and that's it and you can call it Freesync. Gsync compatible is a significantly higher standard then freesync alone. It has to have a full 2.5* range with LFC (basically it's a free sync display that will run as well as original gsync). Nvidia when they adopted freesync meant for the first time ever someone was enforcing a sensible minimum standard.
Hence if you are buying a monitor buy gsync compatible as you know it's been tested by a 3rd party (Nvidia) and hence is going to work properly.
I mean, you could check the range yourself on the spec sheet.........
 

Stuka87

Diamond Member
Dec 10, 2010
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You are wrong Freesync alone is no guarantee of anything - it can be basically useless and have a freesync range between 80 and 100 htz and that's it and you can call it Freesync. Gsync compatible is a significantly higher standard then freesync alone. It has to have a full 2.5* range with LFC (basically it's a free sync display that will run as well as original gsync). Nvidia when they adopted freesync meant for the first time ever someone was enforcing a sensible minimum standard.
Hence if you are buying a monitor buy gsync compatible as you know it's been tested by a 3rd party (Nvidia) and hence is going to work properly.
ooooookay then.

Not only am I not wrong, I even posted evidence to back it up! But you ignored all that for reasons I am sure is obvious to most.

nVidia does NOT test every single GSync Compatible display themselves. The display manufacturer tests the display to show it falls into the spec range that nVidia lists. Which again, the differences are posted right above in a nice, easy to read chart.
 
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Dribble

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Aug 9, 2005
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I mean, you could check the range yourself on the spec sheet.........
That's a start, you'd also have to check reviews and so on. Alternatively you could just check it was gsync compatible and that's all you need to know. Any monitor released these days that isn't at least gsync compatible has probably got bad freesync as monitors with the gsync stamp sell better so they would want that stamp. If the monitor can't get it then what does that tell you about it....

nVidia does NOT test every single GSync Compatible display themselves. The display manufacturer tests the display to show it falls into the spec range that nVidia lists. Which again, the differences are posted right above in a nice, easy to read chart.
Yes they do.
Really all the thread starter wants to know what is the best way of telling if a new monitor he wants to buy is gonna work well with AMD and Nvidia. Gysnc compatible is the answer. The rest is just angry noise.
 

Leeea

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Apr 3, 2020
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Gysnc compatible is the answer.
That is not true. Gsync compatible just means the manufacturer paid nvidia for the privilege of testing said monitor, and passed it on to the consumer.

------------

NVIDIA has a bit weird certification process; for instance, if FreeSync is not automatically enabled when you hook your display to a compatible card, the monitor will not be certified.

In this case, all you’d need to do is enable FreeSync in your monitor’s OSD (On-Screen Display) menu and enable the G-SYNC compatible mode in your NVIDIA drivers settings.

In contrast, there are some NVIDIA-certified G-SYNC compatible monitors have performance issues with FreeSync.

This is mainly the case with some units of VA panel displays such as the AOPEN 27HC1R, the Acer ED273A, etc. - which have the infamous FreeSync brightness flickering issue passing NVIDIA’s G-SYNC compatible testing process.
the best way to determine if a monitor is compatible with gsync is to google "is X monitor working with gsync".


...


This mess is entirely nvidia's fault, gsync was created as a proprietary vender lock in. Freesync is an open VESA standard for DisplayPort, anyone can use it royalty free. Its function and implementation are clearly defined.

It takes serious incompetence for nvidia to continue to screw up an open source standard.
 
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Stuka87

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That's a start, you'd also have to check reviews and so on. Alternatively you could just check it was gsync compatible and that's all you need to know. Any monitor released these days that isn't at least gsync compatible has probably got bad freesync as monitors with the gsync stamp sell better so they would want that stamp. If the monitor can't get it then what does that tell you about it....


Yes they do.
Really all the thread starter wants to know what is the best way of telling if a new monitor he wants to buy is gonna work well with AMD and Nvidia. Gysnc compatible is the answer. The rest is just angry noise.
Ok, claiming that 'GSync Compatible' outsells 'FreeSync' without any evidence is again disingenuous.

Also, claiming that a 'GSync Compatible' display is going to be better than every single non-GSync display is entirely false. nVidia doesn't have any grading system like FreeSync branded displays do (FreeSync, FreeSync Premium, FreeSync Premium Pro).

And the answer to the OP's question is not "GSync Compatible and nothing else". Its find the display that you like with the specs you want. Both families support AdaptiveSync DP protocols.
 

ZGR

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Oct 26, 2012
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As long as the Freesync panel you buy will show up as a Gsync display in NVCP you are fine. You don't know what GPU you will buy next. Several years ago I spent $350 on a used 4k60 Gsync panel. It won't even display an image connected to my R9 290.

My 1440p144hz Freesync panel works great on my 1000 series cards, and was not on the 'official' supported list by NV at first, but worked perfectly fine. If I switch to AMD, my 4k60 Gsync panel will be an iGPU monitor only.

Freesync has given us the freedom to not be locked into Nvidia. I will not make that mistake again.

I would have buyer's remorse buying a G-Sync Ultimate display, only to be locked into one vendor. It might have been a justifiable purchase when AMD had no high-end competitor, but times have changed.
 
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biostud

Lifer
Feb 27, 2003
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AFAIK having a gsync module ensures that adaptive refresh works from 30hz and up, while freesync has all kinds of weird ranges. Typically from 48hz and up.
 

zlatan

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Mar 15, 2011
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If you are on DisplayPort than only FreeSync Premium Pro and G-Sync/G-Sync Ultimate support propieartary features. All other solutions are based on a VESA standard.
 

Tup3x

Senior member
Dec 31, 2016
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New G-Sync module (or latest firmware) supports adaptive sync. There aren't many displays out with it though.

AFAIK having a gsync module ensures that adaptive refresh works from 30hz and up, while freesync has all kinds of weird ranges. Typically from 48hz and up.
Naah, for displays with say 48-144 range anything from 1 to 144 is fine. LFC takes care of it. I think it's probably just a matter of time when adaptive sync displays with variable overdrive become available. That being said, there are displays that have one overdrive setting that works great in all situations (like my Lenovo Y20q-20).
 
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CP5670

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It's definitely better to get a "gsync compatible" display so you can use both Nvidia or AMD cards. There are actually some slight differences with gsync ultimate (having the gsync hardware module) but are not worth being locked to Nvidia. Some displays also support ULMB/BFI or LFC on their own, independently of gsync/freesync.
 

Golgatha

Lifer
Jul 18, 2003
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NurturedHate nailed it.

The only thing I would add is some newer freesync monitors are certified to work with Nvidia. Some older freesync monitors (like mine) work just fine with gsync.

The fastest way to tell if a free sync monitor is compatible is to punch into the internet "model number gsync compatible". Nvidia cannot quite bring itself to say free sync, so it calls it "gsync compatible".

Lastly, ironically "gsync compatible" is frequently better then gsync, as it will frequently go down to 20 fps. ( including on my old monitor much to my surprise)

. . .

I was researching this quite recently, because I wanted to check if I could get my hands on a 3080, it would work with my old monitor ( C32HG70 - it is ok, but my next is an oled ).
Adding one more thing. Even if the monitor isn't on nVidia's list, it will often work if it's Freesync compatible.

For instance, I have an ASUS VP278QG on a GTX 1080 on my son's computer, and have Gsync compatible enabled. Seems to work fine for this setup.
 
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Elfear

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Adding one more thing. Even if the monitor isn't on nVidia's list, it will often work if it's Freesync compatible.

For instance, I have an ASUS VP278QG on a GTX 1080 on my son's computer, and have Gsync compatible enabled. Seems to work fine for this setup.
That's been my experience too.

One thing I seem to remember reading was that a monitor having a higher tier of Freesync features also increases the likelihood that it will be G-Sync compatible. I would imagine most if not all of the Freesync Premium Pro monitors would be G-Sync compatible even if they don't have the official stamp of approval.
 
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