Which country has the worst food... and best.

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destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
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Originally posted by: flunky nassau
A side question: Is there is a food that is distinctively American?

Take the hotdog. The sausage element of it makes me think it had to have originated in Germany.

Hamburgers? That kinda sounds German also.

Pizza? Well duh.

I guess it's just barbecue chicken then.

well, look at it this way. A lot of foods we have here resemble ethnic foods, and the idea of certain foods likely originates in other places.. but we definitely Americanized a lot of those foods. The hotdog can almost certainly be said to have come from bratwurst (German), but the hotdog itself is likely an American food item.
I'd say American food can basically be a mash of assorted ethnic origins but have character and taste all their own, differing from the authentic ethnic foods. And then there are the true authentic American foods, anything barbecued for example, especially authentic barbecue.
 

soonerproud

Golden Member
Jun 30, 2007
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Originally posted by: Capt Caveman
Originally posted by: soonerproud
Originally posted by: Capt Caveman
Originally posted by: djheater
Originally posted by: flunky nassau
A side question: Is there is a food that is distinctively American?

Take the hotdog. The sausage element of it makes me think it had to have originated in Germany.

Hamburgers? That kinda sounds German also.

Pizza? Well duh.

I guess it's just barbecue chicken then.

North American fruits and vegetables changed the palate of the world. before trade to the new world was established, no one had ever seen: tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and squashes of all sorts, potatoes, avocadoes, pepper, corn, cocoa, chiles. Not to mention turkey

Huh?

Tomatoes originated from South America then to Europe then to North America.

Avocadoes originated from Central America.

Cocoa and Potato originated from South America.

etc.

The key word here is that all these things come from a continent that ends with America. The US is not the only country in the Americas.

Then why did he mention North America? Do you consider Brazilian and Peruvian food american?

Because he wasn't thinking when he wrote that post. I'm certain he meant all of America, not just North America.

Brazil and Peru are just as much American as the United States, so yes I do.
 

grrl

Diamond Member
Jun 21, 2001
6,204
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0
American style fast food must rate as the worst.

Talking about food as it's actually made in the country I find Japanese to be overrated. Italian, Korean, Thai and Indian are probably my favorites. Chinese is good too, but varies widely by region.
 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
28,799
359
126
Originally posted by: MagnusTheBrewer
Originally posted by: destrekor
Originally posted by: MagnusTheBrewer
Originally posted by: destrekor

I've tried other food. I simply don't like it. Sorry for have taste preferences. :roll:
and no, I don't put McD's at the top of my favorite food. I much prefer home cooking thanks. But as Capt Caveman pointed out above this post, the proliferation of Chinese and Italian restaurants kind of counters McD's.

I also don't find the problem with eating the food of your country. Sure, America is a melting pot of cultures, but I very much believe that naturally an American culture emerged. I'm proud to be a part of that American culture, otherwise I'd have to call half of Europe home.
My family stretches as far back to Ben Franklin and his dad's family, to something as recent as Polish immigration (I'm 1/8th Polish). I also have a fair amount of German and French ancestry that's not too distant. So part of my history helped establish this country. I think it's fair that I like mostly American food. Considering a lot of Italy eats Italian food, and a lot of immigrants here continue to eat mostly the food of their country at home or go to restaurants that serve that ethnicity's food style.

There's a huge difference between trying and not liking (but willing to try something else) and unwilling to try anything they haven't seen before. It is my claim that 90% of American's fit into the 'unwilling' category.

I am in no way disparaging American foods (I have a soft spot for Diner foods) but, I am poking fun at those who are unwilling to try anything different because "they might not like it."

Oh, I'll try things that I know there is a chance of. But I also take a step back and there are some things (I have been correct on this) that I will refuse to try because I basically know for sure I won't like it. I won't deny that I may like some of these things in the future too, because as you age your sense of taste goes and your taste preferences will change. But at the moment, there are certain foods I know I won't like based on past similar experiences or knowing the main principal ingredients that provide the flavor.

Now, I won't deny trying something if I'm in a setting that basically makes that a rude behavior, say.. if I were to be in Japan and a guest somewhere, and they insisted on me trying something, I'd do it... fearfully though, because I wouldn't want to offend them with possible looks of absolute disgust. lol

if I might not like it... I may try it just to find out.
but there's a category of: no way in hell am I going to like that, so why bother? Those in this category, I have never been wrong.
I have been wrong in the 'I may/may not like it', and after tasting determined it was better than I thought it'd be, it's actually tasty, or downright disgusting. But these are ones I'm willing to try if its suggested I do so.

I'm partially a 'gastronomic coward', but partially just a realist, and also neither at times because I do try things. ;)

Being in Japan makes making faces ruder than doing so in America?

I love trying new foods. Some of the oddest combinations I've had though were Armenian.

English foods have a taste palette that features spices over herbs.

Scandinavians will pickle anything.

In Soviet Russia, if you are eating, it is good food. :)

no, it's not only being in Japan. Sorry if it seemed that way. I have a thing for respect, and I think making/suggesting negative comments about someone's cooking is a rude gesture. There is a proper way to go about suggesting you don't like the food. I don't think making a scrunched face that suggests 'eeeeww, that's fucking gross' is the right way. Taking a bite, keeping a straight face and hiding in the utter disgust and stating "I'm sorry, I just don't like this," and then explaining that it's the dish itself and not the person's cooking (if it was home cooked) that led to its disgusting taste.
 

Iron Woode

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 10, 1999
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most eastern European foods are rather bland. I have no real issue with this as this is my own family roots. But I like a little of everything from around the world.

I think this depends mostly on your own culture. People generally prefer what they are raised on. I prefer the meals I can easily make like stews, roasts, burgers, fish, etc...
 

MagnusTheBrewer

IN MEMORIAM
Jun 19, 2004
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Originally posted by: soonerproud
[
No, a lot of exotic foods are too expensive. Ever tried to buy Panchetta in the Midwest? I can get it here for $28 a pound. If the more exotic foods were more affordable, Americans would be the first in line to try them.

Where I come from (the midwest) Panchetta is not exotic. In fact, the availability of foreign food stuffs in most of U.S. is better than anywhere else in the world. We do pay more than it costs in the country of origin but, that is economics.

The price of those food stuffs, exotic or otherwise, does not affect the adoption of new tastes. Being a gastronomic coward does.
 

soonerproud

Golden Member
Jun 30, 2007
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Originally posted by: MagnusTheBrewer
Originally posted by: soonerproud
[
No, a lot of exotic foods are too expensive. Ever tried to buy Panchetta in the Midwest? I can get it here for $28 a pound. If the more exotic foods were more affordable, Americans would be the first in line to try them.

Where I come from (the midwest) Panchetta is not exotic. In fact, the availability of foreign food stuffs in most of U.S. is better than anywhere else in the world. We do pay more than it costs in the country of origin but, that is economics.

The price of those food stuffs, exotic or otherwise, does not affect the adoption of new tastes. Being a gastronomic coward does.

I just have to disagree with you. Cost is the biggest factor that drives diets in the US. A lot of fast, packaged, junk food is very cheap compared to fresh fruits and vegetables and whole foods. The biggest complaint people have when trying to eat healthier is the added cost of doing so.

Edit:

Panchetta is an exotic food considering it is not available everywhere and the cost is prohibitive for most budgets. That is what determines if something is exotic.
 

FallenHero

Diamond Member
Jan 2, 2006
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Originally posted by: MagnusTheBrewer
Originally posted by: destrekor

I've tried other food. I simply don't like it. Sorry for have taste preferences. :roll:
and no, I don't put McD's at the top of my favorite food. I much prefer home cooking thanks. But as Capt Caveman pointed out above this post, the proliferation of Chinese and Italian restaurants kind of counters McD's.

I also don't find the problem with eating the food of your country. Sure, America is a melting pot of cultures, but I very much believe that naturally an American culture emerged. I'm proud to be a part of that American culture, otherwise I'd have to call half of Europe home.
My family stretches as far back to Ben Franklin and his dad's family, to something as recent as Polish immigration (I'm 1/8th Polish). I also have a fair amount of German and French ancestry that's not too distant. So part of my history helped establish this country. I think it's fair that I like mostly American food. Considering a lot of Italy eats Italian food, and a lot of immigrants here continue to eat mostly the food of their country at home or go to restaurants that serve that ethnicity's food style.

There's a huge difference between trying and not liking (but willing to try something else) and unwilling to try anything they haven't seen before. It is my claim that 90% of American's fit into the 'unwilling' category.

I am in no way disparaging American foods (I have a soft spot for Diner foods) but, I am poking fun at those who are unwilling to try anything different because "they might not like it."

Wooo...how is the weather up there on your high horse?
 

djheater

Lifer
Mar 19, 2001
14,637
2
0
Originally posted by: soonerproud
Originally posted by: Capt Caveman
Originally posted by: soonerproud
Originally posted by: Capt Caveman
Originally posted by: djheater
Originally posted by: flunky nassau
A side question: Is there is a food that is distinctively American?

Take the hotdog. The sausage element of it makes me think it had to have originated in Germany.

Hamburgers? That kinda sounds German also.

Pizza? Well duh.

I guess it's just barbecue chicken then.

North American fruits and vegetables changed the palate of the world. before trade to the new world was established, no one had ever seen: tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and squashes of all sorts, potatoes, avocadoes, pepper, corn, cocoa, chiles. Not to mention turkey

Huh?

Tomatoes originated from South America then to Europe then to North America.

Avocadoes originated from Central America.

Cocoa and Potato originated from South America.

etc.

The key word here is that all these things come from a continent that ends with America. The US is not the only country in the Americas.

Then why did he mention North America? Do you consider Brazilian and Peruvian food american?

Because he wasn't thinking when he wrote that post. I'm certain he meant all of America, not just North America.

Brazil and Peru are just as much American as the United States, so yes I do.

Thanks for the defense! I screwed up and should have said "the Americas"

None of those foods are "American" foods. Really they're just ingredients, what I wanted to get at is how weird it is to think of European cuisine without those foods... Italy without tomatoes?
A world without chocolate?
Spanish food without chiles?

It's a strange thing. What did people eat?

 

MagnusTheBrewer

IN MEMORIAM
Jun 19, 2004
24,135
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Originally posted by: soonerproud
Originally posted by: MagnusTheBrewer
Originally posted by: soonerproud
[
No, a lot of exotic foods are too expensive. Ever tried to buy Panchetta in the Midwest? I can get it here for $28 a pound. If the more exotic foods were more affordable, Americans would be the first in line to try them.

Where I come from (the midwest) Panchetta is not exotic. In fact, the availability of foreign food stuffs in most of U.S. is better than anywhere else in the world. We do pay more than it costs in the country of origin but, that is economics.

The price of those food stuffs, exotic or otherwise, does not affect the adoption of new tastes. Being a gastronomic coward does.

I just have to disagree with you. Cost is the biggest factor that drives diets in the US. A lot of fast, packaged, junk food is very cheap compared to fresh fruits and vegetables and whole foods. The biggest complaint people have when trying to eat healthier is the added cost of doing so.

That is what people say but, the real reason is convenience. When was the last time anyone got out of a fast food place for less than $5? The preparation of food is looked at by most Americans as a necessary evil which keeps them from doing more important things like work, play or watching tv. :(

If there was a pill that provided all the needed nutrients and kept you from being hungry, 90% of Americans would not eat.
 

soonerproud

Golden Member
Jun 30, 2007
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Originally posted by: djheater
Thanks for the defense! I screwed up and should have said "the Americas"

None of those foods are "American" foods. Really they're just ingredients, what I wanted to get at is how weird it is to think of European cuisine without those foods... Italy without tomatoes?
A world without chocolate?
Spanish food without chiles?

It's a strange thing. What did people eat?


No problem. He was just being nitpicky and was trying to use a simple error to discredit an otherwise valid argument.


From what I understand the average European diet consisted of cereals and grains and some meat before the discovery of the Americas.
 

soonerproud

Golden Member
Jun 30, 2007
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Originally posted by: MagnusTheBrewer

That is what people say but, the real reason is convenience. When was the last time anyone got out of a fast food place for less than $5? The preparation of food is looked at by most Americans as a necessary evil which keeps them from doing more important things like work, play or watching tv. :(

If there was a pill that provided all the needed nutrients and kept you from being hungry, 90% of Americans would not eat.


Convenience is a big part of that choice. However, $5 for a fast food meal is still cheaper than the cost of buying healthy food for lunch. I know, because I do the grocery shopping in my house. I make an attempt to eat healthy, but I still have to make some bad choices because the cost of the healthier/leaner foods is outrageous.
 

MagnusTheBrewer

IN MEMORIAM
Jun 19, 2004
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Originally posted by: ultimatebob
Originally posted by: Capt Caveman
imho

Best - India

Worst - England

Oddly enough, England has some really good Indian food. Go figure.

Not so odd, aside from recent émigrés, India was part of the British empire.
 

ForumMaster

Diamond Member
Feb 24, 2005
7,797
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kinda a heard to say. each country has good food and bad food. i like Japanese, Thai, Indian, Italian...i also really like Argentinian food. they make really good meat.
 

MagnusTheBrewer

IN MEMORIAM
Jun 19, 2004
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Originally posted by: soonerproud
Originally posted by: MagnusTheBrewer

That is what people say but, the real reason is convenience. When was the last time anyone got out of a fast food place for less than $5? The preparation of food is looked at by most Americans as a necessary evil which keeps them from doing more important things like work, play or watching tv. :(

If there was a pill that provided all the needed nutrients and kept you from being hungry, 90% of Americans would not eat.


Convenience is a big part of that choice. However, $5 for a fast food meal is still cheaper than the cost of buying healthy food for lunch. I know, because I do the grocery shopping in my house. I make an attempt to eat healthy, but I still have to make some bad choices because the cost of the healthier/leaner foods is outrageous.

Knowledge or, lack thereof, is the other part. I guarantee I could provide healthy lunches for less than $5 dollars anywhere in the country.

The real issue is, that as much as American's talk about eating healthier, most American's have no interest in food, preparation of food or, nutrition. Further, they put little value in those who do.

Sorry OP, I didn't mean to sidetrack your thread. Food is just something I'm passionate about.
 

magomago

Lifer
Sep 28, 2002
10,973
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76
wow...um pretty much any middle eastern cuisine is going to be choice. Mediterranean cuisine is similar to mid east cuisine so it gets high marks from me. Chinese food also tastes good. I like korean tofu, but don't care for the other stuff. Most of japanese doesn't interest me at all. Mexican food is wonderful. Vietnamese food is okay so as long as I get Pho - for other stuff I really prefer the chinese version. indian cuisine is also very very very tasty. Never had any food from sub saharan africa...haven't tried anything from places like phillipines (is there "pinoy food"?). italian and its wonderful pastas are also tasty, although there are other foods i'd prefer ahead of italian food. thai food and its sweet and sour food is a huge hit and miss - but 90% of the time it is a "miss"
bar b que of any culture rules (just keep out the pr0k and i'm a happy camper)

For some reason I'm not all that interested in European foods....partially because to eat it I need to go to a nice sit down place and its going to cost more. That said I never eat our arabic food - too expensive...just go home for it =)
 

sygyzy

Lifer
Oct 21, 2000
14,001
4
76
I can't believe the amount of BS answers here. "America has the best food because you can get any type of food here." ?!?! WTF? How can you seriously type such an idiotic response after reading the OP's question. That's clearly not what he/she is asking.

IMO, best would be Italian or French.

Worst - Not sure. Not that impressed with Northern European, German, etc.

As for food that is distinctively American, nothing really. Face it, it's a relatively new country. The few foods that can be called "All American" are nothing to be proud of. Canada also has pretty much no food history.
 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
28,799
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Originally posted by: sygyzy
I can't believe the amount of BS answers here. "America has the best food because you can get any type of food here." ?!?! WTF? How can you seriously type such an idiotic response after reading the OP's question. That's clearly not what he/she is asking.

IMO, best would be Italian or French.

Worst - Not sure. Not that impressed with Northern European, German, etc.

As for food that is distinctively American, nothing really. Face it, it's a relatively new country. The few foods that can be called "All American" are nothing to be proud of. Canada also has pretty much no food history.

American tradition is to Americanize everything. You really wouldn't find most of the food here served anywhere else, because they are vastly different than the authentic ethnic dishes.
 

spittledip

Diamond Member
Apr 23, 2005
4,480
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Italian is my favorite.. not Americanized Olive Garden crap. My wife is a Trini (from Trinidad) and I love alot of their food too, but Italian still tops it. They have lots of Indian influenced stuff.. lots of madras curry and some masala. Also Creole influence there obviously. The best pepper sauce I have tasted is from Trinidad. They eat almost anything that moves too, which is not my thing...

The worst food.. hard to say as I have not had any authentic european food except for Italian. But, as a person that is not crazy about poorly seasoned meat and poorly seasoned food in general, I would have to say that my guess would go for foods from Germanic countries.
 

spittledip

Diamond Member
Apr 23, 2005
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Originally posted by: soonerproud
Originally posted by: MagnusTheBrewer

That is what people say but, the real reason is convenience. When was the last time anyone got out of a fast food place for less than $5? The preparation of food is looked at by most Americans as a necessary evil which keeps them from doing more important things like work, play or watching tv. :(

If there was a pill that provided all the needed nutrients and kept you from being hungry, 90% of Americans would not eat.


Convenience is a big part of that choice. However, $5 for a fast food meal is still cheaper than the cost of buying healthy food for lunch. I know, because I do the grocery shopping in my house. I make an attempt to eat healthy, but I still have to make some bad choices because the cost of the healthier/leaner foods is outrageous.

Not if you make it yourself. It is much cheaper to buy healthy food to prepare for yourself to bring to work rather than buying food from restaurants. It tastes much better too.
 

spittledip

Diamond Member
Apr 23, 2005
4,480
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O damn! I forgot about Southern food! American Southern food has got to be the worst most flavorless greasy crap I have ever eaten. Soul food also. I dont understand how people eat food that has no flavor or texture... And so much meat! Meat is the least important food group in terms of nutrition, but in America people treat it like the most important. bassackwards.
 

flunky nassau

Senior member
Feb 17, 2007
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I actually wouldn't rate fast food at the bottom of the taste category. When I'm drunk, those Jack in the Box taco are heaven.
 

Midnight Rambler

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
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My vote for worst goes to England. Fish & chips, bangers & mash, pudding.... what else is there?

For starters you forgot jellied eel ... yuk !

Although I must say, a good shepherd's pie is fine by me.


I've actually never eaten an Italian dish that has given me an ZOMG orgasmic experience. Maybe I just haven't eaten the right dish

Here's a recommendation then ... spinach-stuffed ravioli. Mmmmmm !
 

Pocatello

Diamond Member
Oct 11, 1999
9,754
2
76
I wish I could travel more to taste food around the world. I've been to LA, which has Asian and Mexican cuisines, which I like. Give me a good steak, salt-pepper, and a baked potato, I'm happy. Good French bread is amazing, can't get it where I live.