When you go to a new website and you are asked if they can use cookies, do you say yes or no?

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,481
5,279
126
I don't know about this. I generally have just clicked [Accept] but it appears I can still use the site if I say no. I click yes because I figure it will make it easier to use the site, in particular if I return. Am I wrong there? Is it not smart to "Accept"?
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,481
5,279
126
Um, here's a page that discusses this in some detail:

.

Among other things it says there to not accept 3rd party cookies.

  1. Third-party cookies. Not all cookies are the same. It’s a good idea to decline third-party cookies. If you don’t decline, the website could sell your browsing data to third parties. Sharing your personal information with third parties without giving you any control over it could also leave you vulnerable. For one thing, you don’t get to choose the third parties.
What is that??? How do you know if the request is for third party cookies?
 

mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
6,989
977
126
What I do is click on adblock plus element hiding helper, move mouse down to the cookie popup, select it to get rid of it and make the choice global (Not just on that site). Eventually, more and more sites get their !@#$ cookie popup blocked automagically.

That is unless it is a site where I need some functionality from a cookie.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,481
5,279
126
What I do is click on adblock plus element hiding helper, move mouse down to the cookie popup, select it to get rid of it and make the choice global (Not just on that site). Eventually, more and more sites get their !@#$ cookie popup blocked automagically.

That is unless it is a site where I need some functionality from a cookie.
I AM running Adblock Plus in Chome (on W10)... where do I find the element hiding helper?

Myself, I would probably often not know to what extent having a cookie for the site would be helpful. Often I just feel annoyed, probably because I have no intention of revisiting the site, I just got there by clicking a search find. I suppose those are sites I should definitely not want leaving a cookie in my system.
 

mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
6,989
977
126
Element hiding helper is a 2nd add-on designed to work with adblock plus, or there are other ad blockers that have one built in like uBlock.

I don't really care if they make or leave a cookie but i'm sick of the freakin' popup banner asking... just Want It Gone.
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,481
5,279
126
Element hiding helper is a 2nd add-on designed to work with adblock plus, or there are other ad blockers that have one built in like uBlock.

I don't really care if they make or leave a cookie but i'm sick of the freakin' popup banner asking... just Want It Gone.
So, if you use element hiding helper to globally block the popup from ever asking, what happens when you go to a new site where you would benefit from it leaving a cookie? You'd never be asked and wouldn't get the cookie, right?
 

mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
6,989
977
126
^ Right, but that's seldom on new sites I'm visiting. Anywhere I want a cookie, can just disable for it, or not do a global rule for those particular sites.
 

nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
54,155
6,727
126
Firefox can block 3rd party cookies by default, maybe there's something for Chrome to do that too?
My default is to go to whatever cookie settings the site has and disable everything that I can. If they only have an "Accept" option, I just accept them.
 

Lost_in_the_HTTP

Diamond Member
Nov 17, 2019
6,694
3,851
106
Ditto to ABP EHH, but I'm not sure it's available for all browsers. I found it as part of SeaMonkey (formerly Mozilla, formerly Netscape) and use it extensively, but I couldn't find it for Brave or Vivaldi, so SM is still my primary. It may not even be available for the newest SM from what I've read.

But also, does it just make the nag go away? Or does it somehow either accept or decline by default?

Websites work fine as a result though.

I also remember seeing that at least one of the newer browsers has a cookie nag killer built in, but I don't remember which.
 

mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
6,989
977
126
It just makes the nag go away. Accept or decline would depend on what the default behavior is, but it seems like it would be decline due to EU's GDPR, or CA CCPA. GDPR requires consent, but (AFAIK) CCPA just requires a way to opt out.
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
62,931
9,871
126
twitter.com
They always give you the run around if you want to opt out so I just say yes to make it go away.

Also they would need to put a cookie on your system to remember your selection, so even if you say no I'm pretty sure they are still using cookies.

The real bad cookies are the 3rd party ones from ads like Google etc and I already block those anyway.
 

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