What would cause my connection to keep dragging ass?

aphex

Moderator<br>All Things Apple
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Jul 19, 2001
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While wirelessly browsing the web, i notice many times when I click a link the status bar shows either 'Connecting to.." or "Loading..." and it just seems to sit there for a bit until eventually the page loads. Sometimes this pause could be 10 seconds, other times it will sit there for over a minute until I see anything.

Doesn't happen all the time, but very often, maybe once every minute or two. According to OSX I never drop the wireless connection and it happens in both Safari and Firefox. I've also used a net stumbler type app and no one else is near my channel (though i've changed channels and had the same issue) and no one lives close enough by thats on a 2.4ghz phone to kick me off.

Its also not consistent with sites at all, which makes me believe the issue is somewhere on my end. It happens here, eBay, FW, Gizmodo, etc.. Pretty much any site i visit. Sometimes if it gets totally caught up where every site is loading slow, restarting the router occasionally fixes it, but not always.


My Setup;

Macbook 2.2ghz w/ Leopard 10.5.3
Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 running the latest DD-WRT
Brighthouse Networks (Time Warner) Cable - 15mb down / 2mb up
 

NickOlsen8390

Senior member
Jun 19, 2007
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I would try pluged in to the router via ethernet,
What part of central florida are you in?
I have the same ISP same service(mines biz class though) here in brevard county, So I would point fingers at the router/wireless before BHN, because i have none of these problems.
 

spidey07

No Lifer
Aug 4, 2000
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Sounds like normal wifi interference. Change channels to 1, 6, 11 to see what works best and make sure the antennas aren't "pointed" at each other.
 

aphex

Moderator<br>All Things Apple
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Jul 19, 2001
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Originally posted by: spidey07
Sounds like normal wifi interference. Change channels to 1, 6, 11 to see what works best and make sure the antennas aren't "pointed" at each other.

I've tried, they all do it :(

Thinking i may go for a dual band 5ghz router, might have better luck?
 

aphex

Moderator<br>All Things Apple
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Jul 19, 2001
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After checking iStumbler again, maybe getting out of the 2.4ghz is the best bet... Didn't realize how many other networks are nearby.. :(

http://www.iiki.org/wifi.jpg - I'm Banana_Hammock
 

spidey07

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Aug 4, 2000
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5 Ghz doesn't pass through barriers as well but the band is definitely very clean with little to no inteference.

Also do testing with the client and the access point in the same room and retest with channels 1, 6, 11. If you still have problems then something is awry - 2.4 Ghz source near the access point or client, disconnected antenna on ap/client, etc.

Also agree to take wireless and possibly even the router itself out of the mix to make sure it isn't a provider problem.
 

aphex

Moderator<br>All Things Apple
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Jul 19, 2001
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Originally posted by: spidey07
5 Ghz doesn't pass through barriers as well but the band is definitely very clean with little to no inteference.

Also do testing with the client and the access point in the same room and retest with channels 1, 6, 11. If you still have problems then something is awry - 2.4 Ghz source near the access point or client, disconnected antenna on ap/client, etc.

Also agree to take wireless and possibly even the router itself out of the mix to make sure it isn't a provider problem.

1 6 and 11 are already pretty busy though (check the pic in my previous post, i had an old pic on there a second ago and updated it). Isn't it bad to use the same one as them?

UPDATE: Something seems amiss with the time of my ping results as well;

Ping has started ...

PING www.l.google.com (209.85.165.103): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 209.85.165.103: icmp_seq=0 ttl=244 time=54.309 ms
64 bytes from 209.85.165.103: icmp_seq=1 ttl=244 time=55.122 ms
64 bytes from 209.85.165.103: icmp_seq=2 ttl=244 time=174.343 ms
64 bytes from 209.85.165.103: icmp_seq=3 ttl=244 time=130.217 ms
64 bytes from 209.85.165.103: icmp_seq=4 ttl=244 time=106.164 ms
64 bytes from 209.85.165.103: icmp_seq=5 ttl=244 time=56.240 ms
64 bytes from 209.85.165.103: icmp_seq=6 ttl=244 time=56.046 ms
64 bytes from 209.85.165.103: icmp_seq=7 ttl=244 time=168.551 ms
64 bytes from 209.85.165.103: icmp_seq=8 ttl=244 time=299.955 ms
64 bytes from 209.85.165.103: icmp_seq=9 ttl=244 time=94.712 ms

--- www.l.google.com ping statistics ---
10 packets transmitted, 10 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max/stddev = 54.309/119.566/299.955/74.369 ms
 

spidey07

No Lifer
Aug 4, 2000
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WOW! Yeah, you have problems.

Try channel 1 otherwise you're probably SOL and are just dealing with normal wireless problems.
 

aphex

Moderator<br>All Things Apple
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Jul 19, 2001
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eeek, even worse...

Ping has started ...

PING originalsignal.com (81.26.209.17): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 81.26.209.17: icmp_seq=0 ttl=41 time=197.496 ms
64 bytes from 81.26.209.17: icmp_seq=1 ttl=41 time=273.125 ms
64 bytes from 81.26.209.17: icmp_seq=2 ttl=41 time=333.293 ms
64 bytes from 81.26.209.17: icmp_seq=3 ttl=41 time=220.499 ms
64 bytes from 81.26.209.17: icmp_seq=4 ttl=41 time=194.115 ms
64 bytes from 81.26.209.17: icmp_seq=5 ttl=41 time=191.753 ms
64 bytes from 81.26.209.17: icmp_seq=7 ttl=41 time=325.403 ms
64 bytes from 81.26.209.17: icmp_seq=8 ttl=41 time=210.923 ms
64 bytes from 81.26.209.17: icmp_seq=9 ttl=41 time=201.965 ms

--- originalsignal.com ping statistics ---
10 packets transmitted, 9 packets received, 10% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max/stddev = 191.753/238.730/333.293/53.740 ms
 

aphex

Moderator<br>All Things Apple
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Jul 19, 2001
38,572
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Ok, so now my Macbook is wired directly into my cable modem and everything seems much MUCH better. Even hardwired to the router, things were still kinda sluggish and slow. Now everything is zip zip zippity.

Is it normal for some slowdown even when hardwired to a router?
 

spidey07

No Lifer
Aug 4, 2000
65,469
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If you've go a virus or other heavy activity going on then yes. Could always try updating the firmware on the router.
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
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If it was a Windows system I would say to check the Router's MTU, and optimize Windows TCP/IP's MTU and RWin.

However I have No clue how the Mac does it.

BTW, I have a Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 too, and my grandson has a Macbook.

When he comes with the Macbook he uses my Wireless as is and there is No problems.
 

Lemon law

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Nov 6, 2005
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Originally posted by: aphex
Ok, so now my Macbook is wired directly into my cable modem and everything seems much MUCH better. Even hardwired to the router, things were still kinda sluggish and slow. Now everything is zip zip zippity.

Is it normal for some slowdown even when hardwired to a router?
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I have been following this thread with some interest and it strikes me as a troubleshooting problem. Thus far spidey07 seems to be the only one who was suggesting the step you just took.

But now you are finally doing some troubleshooting in some sort of a scientific way. And you suddenly have plenty of "zip zip zippity" speed when you wire the modem directly into the mac book. Which tells you right away the fault is not in the cable provider. So you have established
a basic first fact because a wireless router is not going to speed up a bad connection.

Now you are at step two. Which should be asking is it your router or your wireless network that causes the speed drop. And now doing the further tests scientifically is either going to take some money invested or some creativity. But still, systematic troubleshooting is a process of setting up a testable hypothesis and testing it. And one should also have a measuring yard stick better than it feels zippy. So downloading and bookmarking some internet speed test would be helpful because it will give you at least a semi hard number of the difference between directly wiring the modem into the mac book and using the router to wireless router combination.

But after reading this thread, the hypothesis that jumps out at me is that your wireless router is trying to log you onto all the other networks in your vicinity. And as you mentioned, another application you have, netstumbler as I recall, is detecting quite a few
other networks. Thus far, changing channels has not improved anything, so how do you test
the hypothesis?

I can think of the following ways to test.

1. Since the location where you are at is other network saturated, go to some other location that is not other wireless saturated. And while your macbook and wire less router is easily portable, sadly your cable connection is not. But a quick call to your cable provider tech support department may yield a location where you could quickly test a temporary connection in an area where there are no other wireless networks. Or you might have a friend who is on the same type setup and go there. And again use the same test methodology, get a throughput number directly connected to the mac book, and then a throughput number when the wireless router is added into the equation, if suddenly you do dramatically better than you did at home, you know your wireless router is not the problem
and the other networks near your home are the problem. And if your connection with the router added in still lags badly, its time to chuck your wireless router after you preform one more test. Because you don't know if its a defect in your router or a defect in the wireless receiver in your mac book.

2. I do not know enough about the various security protocols involved, but securing YOUR home network might prevent your mac book from wanting to join other available networks.

3. As was already suggested, a wireless router using some frequency other than 2.4 Ghz seems a logical but expensive step. A quick call to various local computer stores might yield
some try before you buy options, especially if they have some open box returns.

4. From past reading of a cross section of various networking forums, a wireless router seems to always have a performance hit, yet a hardwired router is going to have almost no
performance hit while it adds firewall protection. How important is having a computer you can take into any location of your house to you?