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Question What specs are important on a new PCI-e network card?

tinpanalley

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I need to get a new card for faster speeds I'm going to be getting and for future proofing. For the time being I'll be getting 2gbps but I'd like to not have to buy another card for as long as I can avoid it.
What do I need to look at? I don't have much experience with buying network cards. I definitely don't need it to have WiFi, Bluetooth would be cool if that's possible.
But there are surely specs that matter to ensure the card is good for my purposes. It's basic internet use with Cat7e cables that we have, but if it makes a difference, we do a lot of sending and receiving of uncompressed video and audio to a private server.
Any help would be great. Thanks!
 
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mxnerd

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Anything based on Marvell AQC-107 chipset (1, 2.5, 5, & 10G), it seems there are no other competitors.

*Marvell aquired aquantia* in 2019

There won't be any multi-gig NIC comes with WiFi and bluetooth, you need another USB/PCIe adapter.

You will need multigig switch too for your LAN, unless you use direct link between machines.

Multigig name usually referred to devices that can also run at 2.5G & 5G however. RJ45 1G&10G only switches will be cheaper than multi-gig switches.
 
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VirtualLarry

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Yeah, I've not seen combo wired + wifi PCI-E NICs, although you can pick up a 2.5GbE PCI-E or USB 3.0 NIC for sub-$30 these days.

You can also get wifi NICs with BT for various price points.

If PCI-E slot expansion slot capability is limited, both types of NICs are available in USB3 varieties. (Up to a 5GbE wired NIC.)
 
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VirtualLarry

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It's basic internet use with Cat7e cables that we have, but if it makes a difference, we do a lot of sending and receiving of uncompressed video and audio to a private server.
A little clarification would seem in order here.

Basic internet use, does not require anything above a 1GbE NIC, IMHO, if going wired. And you'll need an internet connection to match.


Did you mean to say Cat5E, or do you really use Cat7e cables?

By "private server", do you mean a server hosted over the internet, or a NAS on your LAN? If it's the latter, then and only then, would I suggest going to 10GbE, if you really have Cat6A+ cables, and the NAS is also sufficiently capable. You'll also likely need a switch to connect them.
 

tinpanalley

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A little clarification would seem in order here.

Basic internet use, does not require anything above a 1GbE NIC, IMHO, if going wired. And you'll need an internet connection to match.


Did you mean to say Cat5E, or do you really use Cat7e cables?

By "private server", do you mean a server hosted over the internet, or a NAS on your LAN? If it's the latter, then and only then, would I suggest going to 10GbE, if you really have Cat6A+ cables, and the NAS is also sufficiently capable. You'll also likely need a switch to connect them.
Cat 7. 7e was a typo.
I'm saying other than the uploading of video files, the REST is just regular internet use.
 

VirtualLarry

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If you need to upload video files to a private server on the internet, then you're going to need a Comcast consumer Metro-E connection for $300-500/mo., if you want faster than gigabit uploads. GL!
 

mxnerd

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https://www.reddit.com/r/googlefiber/comments/k9aa95

Not even Google Fiber support team describe the Technicolor router GFRG300 correctly. There should be only 3 yellow gigabit ports. I guess the silver color port is multigig, with yellow patch cable plugged in. Red port probably is 10G?

Unable to find pdf manual for the model.

Apparently you can get up to 2Gbps even if you live in the cities that have Google fiber. Not 2.5G if you bought a new multigig NIC.

==

The question is, if you are only sending/receiving a lot of videos on your LAN, why do you need 2Gbps internet like VL had asked?
 
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VirtualLarry

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The question is, if you are only sending/receiving a lot of videos on your LAN, why do you need 2Gbps internet like VL had asked?
He wouldn't say what he meant by "private server", whether he meant a server on the internet, or a NAS or server on a LAN.
 

VirtualLarry

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I need to get a new card for faster speeds I'm going to be getting and for future proofing. For the time being I'll be getting 2gbps but I'd like to not have to buy another card for as long as I can avoid it.
I guess the "I'll be getting 2gbs" is in regards to an internet connection?

In that case, just grab a branded RealTek 2.5gbe card, Rosewill is cheap, maybe an asus or Trendnet.

Unless, you don't want to open the PC again to upgrade to 10gbe / multi-gig, in 2-3 years.
 
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mxnerd

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He wouldn't say what he meant by "private server", whether he meant a server on the internet, or a NAS or server on a LAN.
I'm betting that he was talking about an NAS device on a LAN, as an NAS device probably will provide an upload/download web interface for the clients, and he mentioned regular internet usage. If it's Windows/Linux based device, we usually say copy/transfer, but I'm not sure he really know the difference?
 
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tinpanalley

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I guess the "I'll be getting 2gbs" is in regards to an internet connection?
Correct. Thanks for the recommendation.
I upload video uncompressed to a server I share with others wher eI also do web hosting because it's the best way to send these deliverables without using physical media and mail. Cloud takes too long.
 

mxnerd

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So if ISP starts to offer 5Gbps or 10Gbps, you still need to upgrade again. Upgrade from 1Gbps (if it's what you have now) to 2Gbps can't be labeled as future proof. :confused:


 

sdifox

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Yes, I know. But the modem has a 10G output port and 3 other 1g ports. I'd send one of those 1g ports to my switch for the 1g or less reliant devices.
Do you know if the 10g port is also 2.5g?

Also what is your upload speed on wan side? I doubt it's more than gigabit.
 
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mxnerd

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Do you know if the 10g port is also 2.5g?

Also what is your upload speed on wan side? I doubt it's more than gigabit.
OP just won't say who the ISP is.

Google 2Gbps plan only provides 1Gbps upload.
 

mxnerd

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So this is probably your router?




You should get a 10/1 Gbps or 10/5/2.5/1 Gbps NIC for your PC and plug in directly to the Home Hub 4000 router's ETH 10G port,

or buy an additional 10/1 Gbps or 10/5/2.5/1 switch (with at least 2 10G ports) and connect the new NIC to the 10G switch and uplink to the router's 10G port.

Be aware that since that ETH 10G port is not particular labeled as multigig, it's quite possible it can only run at either 10G or 1G speed, not 2.5Gbps or 5Gbps.

未命名.png
 
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sdifox

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Sorry, didnt think any of you were in Canada. Yes, it's Bell. The HH4000 will give me a 10g port.
Then get a 10gbe card. For example https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B072N84DG6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_glt_i_TMZVSFH6RCND7WB75R78


Not sure if this will impact you or not, but that particular modem/router box has issues doing proper gateway mode. ONT is now integrated.



You are probably the only one here that doesn't know I am Canadian :cool:
 
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tinpanalley

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I got a tplink, the ASUS seemed to bring up a certain issue for a lot of people.
Not sure if this will impact you or not, but that particular modem/router box has issues doing proper gateway mode. ONT is now integrated.
What is proper gateway mode, and I can see if it will impact me or not.
You are probably the only one here that doesn't know I am Canadian :cool:
The funnier thing to me is how many years you've helped me for here without having any slightest clue we were both Canadian. Quintessentially Canadian of me, I suppose, to not imagine there could possible be another Canadian in a forum I frequent.
 

sdifox

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Well proper gateway mode is one where you can bypass their router completely. But since the ONT is built in you don't get that option. It is not a problem for you I imagine.


There are a few Canadians here lol.
 
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tinpanalley

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Well proper gateway mode is one where you can bypass their router completely. But since the ONT is built in you don't get that option. It is not a problem for you I imagine.
I see. Do you mean bypass their router or their modem? I mean, in the case of a 3000/4000 they're one and the same device. I could see why one would want to bypass a 4000 for one's own modem with more control and possibly even better QoS. But if we're simply talking routers how would gateway mode be different than just using just a switch? I assume a router is used by most people to simply send a WiFi or cable signal to other devices, right?
(Sort of related, is there ANY way to put a new ASUS modem or something on Bell's Fibre cable? Or would you have to have to have the same kind of input on the modem as on a 4000. While we're on the subject if anyone can give me the names for all these ports and connections I'd like to learn them all so I don't have to keep saying 'the white cable with the green squarish thingy on the end that goes into the metal port thing on the modem'. Been trying to find a site that has images and official names for these things.)
 

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