Question What monitor would you recommend to an artist for digital illustration display?

RoonieW

Junior Member
Feb 9, 2022
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I usually draw with a graphics tablet connected to my laptop, and so I am now going to update to a desk computer because I need it for work so I want to get a really nice monitor that will give me crisp colors & amazing contrast for checking on details while drawing.

What monitor would you recommend to have an amazing image and the truest of colors possible?
 

daveybrat

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Jan 31, 2000
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Could you give us some details as to what you want?

Like what size monitor? Do you want the best color accuracy? Do you prefer flat or curved? Will you game on it at all?
 

RoonieW

Junior Member
Feb 9, 2022
2
0
6
Could you give us some details as to what you want?

Like what size monitor? Do you want the best color accuracy? Do you prefer flat or curved? Will you game on it at all?
Best color accuracy possible. I prefer a flat one since I'll be doing digital illustrations and I print them in flat surfaces so I don't want any distortions in my brain while I draw. For sizes I'm open to different sizes, anything is better to my laptop's screen, so bigger than 15 inches.
 

daveybrat

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Jan 31, 2000
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Best bang for the buck monitor for what you ask is this:


ASUS ProArt Display PA278QV 27” WQHD (2560 x 1440) Monitor, 100% sRGB/Rec. 709 ΔE < 2, IPS, DisplayPort HDMI DVI-D Mini DP, Calman Verified, Eye Care, Anti-glare, Tilt Pivot Swivel Height Adjustable


The ProArt series is designed especially for the best color accuracy and photo and video editing enthusiasts.
 

Fallen Kell

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
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Yeah, I was about to recommend most anything in the ASUS ProArt line. There are a few that are not that good in the lineup, but in general, they have the features that you probably want/need for this kind of work, especially if anything needs to go from the digital realm to the physical via being printed.
 

SAAA

Senior member
May 14, 2014
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Kinda late but... for art I really suggest anything with no less than 4K resolution. You're gonna notice the pixels far more than the colours with everyday use, anyway most IPS panels today are in the decent to good range if you don't cheap out, anything not aimed at "gamers" might sport pretty good colour accuracy too.
Maybe check there if there's no back light bleed on edges and such in the review comments.
 

Fallen Kell

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
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OP said amazing contrast so doesn't that rule out IPS monitors?
Not really. The purpose of most monitor for digital artistry work is to match the industry standards. The standards are there for a reason, as they are what are used to have multiple people be able to work on a project together when using different equipment. This lets everything stay consistent and allows to conversion to different media, such as print (think movie posters, billboards, display pieces, advertisement kiosks, pamphlets, magazines, newspapers, etc), or use in digital projects (think online ads, video game assets, digital movie assets, digital videos/movies, DVD/Blu-ray/UHD/cinema master drives, etc).

If the purpose is to use the monitor for artistry work, matching the standards in use by the entire production chain is the utmost important thing. The last thing you want is for a monitor to run your image through an "enhancement algorithm" to which makes it look more "vivid", or "lifelike", etc. (basically just about everything that TV and computer monitor manufacturers typically do to separate their product from their competitor's so that it "looks better" on the demo loop that is running at the retail store). That is the last thing you want on a monitor for a digital artist as you are then tweaking and creating an image to look good on your specific model of your specific brand display, not realizing that your display is "correcting" things behind the scene on you, such that the moment that you take it to be viewed on another monitor, it looks completely different than what you had intended, with colors, hues, lumens all off from what you really wanted and as such might not match correctly with other works that you are/were using as reference materials.
 

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