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  • Community Question: What makes a good motherboard?

Question What makes a good motherboard?

MMohammed

Assistant Community Manager
Staff member
Sep 3, 2019
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Whether you're thinking about buying your first one or springing for an upgrade, shopping for a motherboard can be strenuous. For some of us, it's a research-intensive process and requires a lot of consideration.

Am I planning on regularly overclocking? Which slots - and how many of them - do I need my mobo to have? Then there's form factor to consider, and the list goes on.

How about you? What qualities do you look for in a quality motherboard?
 

jrg9206

Junior Member
Nov 18, 2020
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A good motherboard is based on a computer system design, so you must keep in mind what might be the purpose of the motherboard such as Graphic/CAD/CAM, Gaming, Audio/Video Editing, Networking, and Virtualization. Also, be aware of the motherboard form factor will be part of a Thin Client, a Standard Thick Client, a Home Server, an Industrial Computer, or a Mobile Computer.
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
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A good motherboard is based on a computer system design, so you must keep in mind what might be the purpose of the motherboard such as Graphic/CAD/CAM, Gaming, Audio/Video Editing, Networking, and Virtualization.
What makes a particular motherboard work better in things like gaming or video editing?
 

jrg9206

Junior Member
Nov 18, 2020
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What makes a particular motherboard work better in things like gaming or video editing?
Basically, the differences lay in the capacity among hardware, such as: for Gaming the motherboard needs to support powerful multicore processor(s), High-end video cards (with maximum video RAM and specialized GPU), High-definition sound card, and speakers, High-end system cooling, an SSD, large amount of RAM, Large display or dual displays, quality mouse, optional gaming console, Headphone with microphone, Optional 3D glasses (if supported by the video card and monitor); and for Audio/Video Editing the motherboard needs to support specialized video card with maximum video RAM and GPU, specialized audio (sound) card and speakers, very fast and large-capacity hard drive, Dual monitors, powerful multicore processor(s), a large amount of system RAM, Quality mouse, and possible digital tablet or scanner.

If you noticed, gamers frequently build their own systems, but some computer manufacturers make gaming PCs, so gaming computers are a unique type of PC. However, an Audio/Video Editing workstation is used to manipulate sounds (shorten, add, overlay, and so on) or video, so this type of system requires a lot of hard drive space and RAM.






 

GrumpyMan

Diamond Member
May 14, 2001
5,558
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Lights, lots of RGB.....j/k....determine what the computer will be mainly used for and go on from there as far as what you will be needing: wifi, processors/ram, what kind of storage will be needed, gpu needed, etc. etc....reviews read all the reviews you can when you narrow it down to 2 or 3 mobos within your price range. The components used on the mobos, like the quality of the capacitors used for example, from the manufacturer are important to me because I want durability for years.
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
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Basically, the differences lay in the capacity among hardware, such as: for Gaming the motherboard needs to support powerful multicore processor(s), High-end video cards (with maximum video RAM and specialized GPU), High-definition sound card, and speakers, High-end system cooling, an SSD, large amount of RAM, Large display or dual displays, quality mouse, optional gaming console, Headphone with microphone, Optional 3D glasses (if supported by the video card and monitor); and for Audio/Video Editing the motherboard needs to support specialized video card with maximum video RAM and GPU, specialized audio (sound) card and speakers, very fast and large-capacity hard drive, Dual monitors, powerful multicore processor(s), a large amount of system RAM, Quality mouse, and possible digital tablet or scanner.

If you noticed, gamers frequently build their own systems, but some computer manufacturers make gaming PCs, so gaming computers are a unique type of PC. However, an Audio/Video Editing workstation is used to manipulate sounds (shorten, add, overlay, and so on) or video, so this type of system requires a lot of hard drive space and RAM.
uhh... simple answer no...

There is no such thing as a good motherboard.
Its either you have too much junk which is worthless and gets replaced with aftermarket.
Or its you got overcharged because it was classed in "Gamer" which isn't really a gamer, but something like a ugly girl with lots and lots of makeup to make it look expensive.

You first got "Overclocking" tier... which has all the digital mosfets, extra mosfets, so many more mosfets that the board designers needed to play tetris to fit onto the board, and has cold stability to handle negative degree temps for LN2 pots.
"Gamer" is a market tag which represents almost nothing but RGB.
Its worse then "Enthusiast Tier" which IMO is a bastardization of "Enterprise" tier. Basically the two can be overswapped, Enthusiast tier is basically a dressed up enterprise tier with a bit more embellished cooling because they do not expect the boards to be sitting under 5000rpm industrial enterprise fans in a air conditioned server room.

So to answer the OP's question.... there is really no such thing as a good motherboard.
Its either a pretty RGB out lets overcharge the public because its used by Esports and has a "Gamer" tag.
Or its a overclocking extreme board to get high overclocks and use specialized components which 99% of us wont use because it wont be sitting under a Liquid Nitrogen Sink, but lets charge them anyway tier.
And finally you got your enthusiast tier, which is where most of the content creators, CAD, and all the other stuff not related to a corporation related IT falls under.
And finally you got your enterprise gear, where all the expensive stuff unimaginable goes under and also where price tags can quickly escalate 10x the market price of consumer gear.
 
Last edited:

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
101,005
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the last two motherboards i've bought have been definitely not enough (cheap asus matx - could use another ethernet port and another x16 slot or second nvme, maybe wifi as well) and probably too much (taichi which i'm not using to its full potential). so i guess, one that costs enough but not too much.
 

MalVeauX

Senior member
Dec 19, 2008
375
29
91
Too broad to answer.

The funny thing about a MB is that they all will work and do the job for literally every purpose, so they're all "good enough" in that respect. From there, it's about purpose utilization and building.

Another funny thing is that in the pre-made market world, it's all about advertising what CPU or GPU is involved and rarely ever talks about the actual MB.

For me, a good MB would be one that has no frill and whistles with "onboard crap." I don't want the "HD" audio junk. I don't want their cheap LAN components. I certainly don't want some built in WiFi junk either. I want good components and thermal handling with a lot of expansion capability. Minimalist so that you can purpose build. This doesn't exist.

Very best,
 

Leeea

Member
Apr 3, 2020
117
154
76
For me, a good MB would be one that has no frill and whistles with "onboard crap." I don't want the "HD" audio junk. I don't want their cheap LAN components. I certainly don't want some built in WiFi junk either. I want good components and thermal handling with a lot of expansion capability. Minimalist so that you can purpose build. This doesn't exist.
It does exist! You just need a 286!
https://www.ebay.com/itm/153254257146?mkevt=1&mkcid=28&chn=ps

I am so glad that died. The day mainboard manufacturers realized that putting onboard audio on was cheaper then putting another ISA slot on was wonderful. Same with serial ports, networking, IDE controllers, USB ports, WiFi, onboard video, SATA controllers, and especially bluetooth.

If you really hate it all that much, you can always go into the BIOS options and turn them off.
 
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