What is the difference between motherboards h77, z77, and so

Discussion in 'Motherboards' started by Shephard, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. Shephard

    Shephard Senior member

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    Ok I understand that

    z68 = Sandy Bridge motherboard.
    z77 = Ivy Bridge motherboard.

    now h77 usually has only 2 dimms and 1 PCI-E 16x. Also they usually have no 5.1/7.1 audio and less USB 3.0 ports and no esata ports.

    Now is that only the difference?

    Someone told me that the motherboards have less features like Intel Clear HD video and Intel Smart Cache.

    But I thought those had to do with the CPU? Some CPUs have those features locked?

    thank you.
     
  2. dave_the_nerd

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    Chipset is not the same as motherboard.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_chipsets#5.2F6.2F7_Series_chipsets

    A given chipset will support either all, or some, of the CPU's features. (Number of memory channels, number of PCI lanes, integrated video, etc.)

    It's then up to the motherboard manufacturer to implement all or some of the features on the motherboard that the chipset supports. (SLI/CF, integrated video, number of SATA ports, surround sound, etc.)

    Within a given generation (6x series, 7x series) performance will be more or less the same, notwithstanding whatever features may effect performance. (Number of memory lanes, maximum bus/memory speed.)

    The H77 you mentioned actually can support more than 2 DIMM slots. It's just that it's a non-premium chipset, so it tends to be used on lower-end boards where cost is more important than expandability.

    The differences between the H77 and Z77 are outlined here:

    http://www.pugetsystems.com/blog/2012/04/12/z68-z77-and-h77-whats-the-difference/
     
    #2 dave_the_nerd, Nov 3, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2012
  3. Shephard

    Shephard Senior member

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    ok thanks for the links. So I misunderstood, it's chipset what I am talking about.

    I am confused on the wikipedia article it says Z77 Panther Point "8 PCI-E 2.0."

    Asrock Z77 Extreme 4 which I read is the most popular board right now, only 6 PCI slot. But it's 2 PCI-Express 3.0, 2 PCI-Express, and 2 PCI. So only 6?

    So what does it mean on the wikipedia "8 PCI-E 2.0." Depending on manufacturer it can have up to 8? But what is the 2.0? All new z77 boards should have 3.0 right?

    Also confuse on B75 vs H77 looking at wikipedia article.

    B75 looks to be smaller Micro board than H77. But B75 can be overclocked?

    On the other article you link me it says H77 cannot be overclocked.

    B75 has only 2 dimm slot and 1 sata 3, but processors used with it can overclock?

    H77 has more dimm as you says and more sata 3, but cannot be unlocked?

    So why would you go H77 ?

    this board http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157310

    it has 5.1 surround sound, esata, usb 3, and can overclock.
     
    #3 Shephard, Nov 3, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2012
  4. Insert_Nickname

    Insert_Nickname Platinum Member

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    Simple. Those are PCIe lanes from the PCH (chipset) for stuff like expansion chips/cards. Today CPUs have integrated the northbridge, hence PCIe 3.0 (only Ivy has PCIe 3.0, Sandy only has 2.0) comes directly from the CPU. An Ivy Bridge has 16 lanes available plus the DMI link to the PCH. Depending on which chipset you use those lines from the CPU can be split in various configurations f.x. 16x 8x+8x or 8x+4x+4x. Mainstream-chipsets like the H77 usually just has a single 16x for a single graphics card. The Z77 can be various combinations that are necessary for things like Crossfire/SLI...

    If you run PCIe 3.0 don't worry about bandwidth, there is no difference between PCIe 3.0 x8 and PCIe 2.0 x16.

    Hope that clarifies a few things...

    Edit; you need a Z68/Z77 for overclocking, both the H77 and B75 does not allow it...
     
    #4 Insert_Nickname, Nov 3, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2012
  5. Shephard

    Shephard Senior member

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    yes helps but I will need to read more that is above my knowledge level.

    this board I linked you though says -

    Supports Intel Turbo Boost 2.0 Technology
    Supports Intel K-Series unlocked CPU
    Supports Hyper-Threading Technology
     
  6. tweakboy

    tweakboy Diamond Member

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    Then what about X79 like the P9X79 I thought that was ivy chipset. h77 and z68 have been out for long time about 2 years... gl
     
  7. WiseUp216

    WiseUp216 Platinum Member

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  8. Shephard

    Shephard Senior member

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    I am still confused because the board I linked says it can overclock and it's not a z77.
     
  9. Binky

    Binky Diamond Member

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    I don't own a B75 board to confirm, but it is my understanding that you cannot manipulate the multipliers like on a Z77 board. If you want to overclock, get the Z77. If not, the H77 or B75 may be just as good.
     
  10. Shephard

    Shephard Senior member

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    do all z77 boards have the same chipset features? I looked at links above but I know companies have there own sort of bios stuff.

    I want to know if asrock z77 extreme 4 really is the best.
     
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