What is the best and safest way to remove the dust from a high end LCD screen?

xMax

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Sep 2, 2005
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I bought a very expensive EIZO monitor with a hard coated anti glare surface and was wondering what anybody has to say about the best way to remove dust from the surface of such a screen or any LCD screen, since they are all probably the same.

Ive looked at many products available on the net, but the problem is that they are all for removing stains as assessing the quality of the products with out seeing them in application is very difficult. Ive purchased products from local computers stores, but after testing them on my sisters very cheap LCD, they turned out to be stain removal specialized products, which remove the dust but produce smudges on the screen. One almost has to carry out a perfect cleaning job to avoid producing streak like smudges, which is very difficult to carry out.

ive considered just blowing on the screen, but i know it would be just a matter of time before little spurts of saliva would fall on the screen.

A computer technician and friend of mine recommended that i use a very fine high quality record disk cleaning brush.

What do you guys think ?



 

jimbob200521

Diamond Member
Apr 15, 2005
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i wouldnt blow on the screen for the very reason you stated: saliva

two options: compressed air

or

at wal-mart, in the eye glass (eye glass, eye care, glasses, whatever its called) section, they have (at least at ours they do) some lens wipes that are like 10 or so of them for exactly 1 dollar after tax. they work great, and not only for dust. only problem is if you have a farily large monitor, you may have to use multiple wipes. on my old lcd (18.1"), i could usually get away with one wipe, but it was close
 

TazExprez

Senior member
Aug 7, 2001
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I clean all of my LCD's with water and soft tissue paper. It hasn't caused any scratches on them, yet.
 

EagleEye

Senior member
Nov 5, 2005
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you can use rubbing alcahol (that is what they use to clean dust off in the factory so it is safe)
 

xMax

Senior member
Sep 2, 2005
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so far from all the info gathered from this forum and others, the idea seems to revolve around microfiber cloths and specialized alcohol based solutions. i have also considered compressed air, but they can sometimes release liquids that may pose a problem.

the monitor i have is an EIZO CG210. not as expensive as the CG220, but still very expensive. 2500$US.
 

Jiggz

Diamond Member
Mar 10, 2001
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I just brush them with fine soft bristled paint brush about 1" -1 1/2" wide about once a week. Works perfect.
 

Arcanedeath

Platinum Member
Jan 29, 2000
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For just dust I'd suggest a slightly damp lint free cloth and distilled or at least fairly pure water.
 

xanis

Lifer
Sep 11, 2005
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there are these lint-free cloths that you can buy at staples for like $2, and they're specifically for cleaning lcd monitors.
 

Sforsyth

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Mar 3, 2005
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Originally posted by: xMax
so far from all the info gathered from this forum and others, the idea seems to revolve around microfiber cloths and specialized alcohol based solutions. i have also considered compressed air, but they can sometimes release liquids that may pose a problem.

the monitor i have is an EIZO CG210. not as expensive as the CG220, but still very expensive. 2500$US.



For that much money you think it would clean it self.
 

xMax

Senior member
Sep 2, 2005
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i dont want to use a cloth, since they are very likely to cause streaks. So i think im going to have to go with some kind of a microfiber brush, like the ones used for cleaning record disks. With gentle stroking, i cant see how this approach could go wrong.
 

DAPUNISHER

Super Moderator CPU Forum Mod and Elite Member
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Aug 22, 2001
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Originally posted by: xMax
i dont want to use a cloth, since they are very likely to cause streaks. So i think im going to have to go with some kind of a microfiber brush, like the ones used for cleaning record disks. With gentle stroking, i cant see how this approach could go wrong.
I use the microfiber one I linked dry, and there hasn't been an issue with streaking, but do as you wish :)

 

corkyg

Elite Member | Peripherals
Super Moderator
Mar 4, 2000
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Much like Dapunisher - I lightly dust with a dry Swiffer. No problems at all.
 

John

Moderator Emeritus<br>Elite Member
Oct 9, 1999
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I've been cleaning my LCD's with a Microfiber towel for several years. I lightly dampen one end with water and lightly polish the screen with it, then I flip it over and use the dry side to buff out any streaks. I use the same method to clean my 50" WEGA A10 as well.
 

mrza

Member
Oct 18, 2005
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This is what I use.

http://www.adorama.com/CHPECPP.html

They are 99.99% contaminant free dry photo wipes. Its impossible to scratch anything with them. They are usually used for cleaning photographic film, print emulsions and digital camera sensors but they clean my lcd perfectly.
 

xMax

Senior member
Sep 2, 2005
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I guess they all work. I personally dont like cloths. But a lint freen microfiber cloth would definitely be right. I bought a microfiber just yesterday, but i dont know if its lint free. For this reason a soft microfiber brush would be best. But those are difficult to find. Anyways, it seems that all approaches work, so i just have to make up my mind.

Max
 

interchange

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 1999
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i have also considered compressed air, but they can sometimes release liquids that may pose a problem.

Not exactly the way it works. The compressed air is cold because it's under high pressure. When you release cold air into an environment that is warmer which has more water vapor in the air (a.k.a. more humid), it cools the evaporated water and can condense. The compressed air isn't actually releasing any liquid. The water is coming from the air. It doesn't spontaneously condense either. It condenses around a charged, small surface area (e.g. dust particles).

But if you're in a dry area, have air conditioning, or have a de-humidifer, you should be fine with the compressed air since you'd need a bit of humidity for it to happen.
 

xMax

Senior member
Sep 2, 2005
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perhaps your right interchange. But ive decided to go with two products, one is called pec pads, which is a very fine lint free pad used to clean very delicate surfaces, like my monitor. And the other is a kinetronix staticwisk cleaning brush, which is apparently very fine and used to clean camera lenses, optics, films, slides and any such delicate surface. Although an LCD may not be the same type of lense, i dont see that there should be a problem, especially when it says that the product could be used for monitors. Of course, by monitors, they could be referring to CRTs. Nontheless, i will swipe with very delicate motion to ensure maximum caution.

If anybody sees problems with either of these two products, or would know which is better, then please feel free to add in your comments.

thanks to all

Max