What happened to the Arts and Craft and Prarie style homes?

Arkitech

Diamond Member
Apr 13, 2000
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My wife and I talk about this all the time, why do developers today insist on building the exact same box style homes? What happened to creative home design and architecture? Contemporary style homes, bungalows, prarie houses, arts and craft homes, Tudors are all just a thing of the past now. I would have thought with the advancements in manufacturing, tool design and prefab material that homes today should look better than ever but instead they have take a turn for the worse.

Here's a few examples of what I consider to be great architecture:

Contemporary

Arts and Craft (click the house for 169,900)

German Tudor (click the house for 140,000)

Bungalow
 

badmouse

Platinum Member
Dec 3, 2003
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Interesting that no one has checked in on this one.

When we first moved to NJ, we lived in an Arts & Crafts Tudor home. It was built in the 20's. It had a lot of amazing handdone architectural touches. To build that kind of thing today, the craftswork alone would cost a fortune.

Also, it was not even remotely up to code, in terms of plumbing, electrical, fire safety, etc. And it didn't have any closets :) .

I think today's construction has different priorities. I may not appreciate those priorities, but there you are.
 

43st

Diamond Member
Nov 7, 2001
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Everything new these days seem to be McMansions, I'm not sure if that's the proper name though, only what I've heard them called.
 

Arkitech

Diamond Member
Apr 13, 2000
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Originally posted by: badmouse
Interesting that no one has checked in on this one.

When we first moved to NJ, we lived in an Arts & Crafts Tudor home. It was built in the 20's. It had a lot of amazing handdone architectural touches. To build that kind of thing today, the craftswork alone would cost a fortune.

Also, it was not even remotely up to code, in terms of plumbing, electrical, fire safety, etc. And it didn't have any closets :) .

I think today's construction has different priorities. I may not appreciate those priorities, but there you are.

You would'nt happen to have any pics would you? Those Arts and Craft homes are my favorites next to Contemporaries.

I agree that the woodworking in those homes back then would cost a small fortune these days, but I still can't figure why most places built today are so generic. I've been in a few "new" neighborhoods where almost everyhome in the subdivision looks exactly the same. It's like being on the set of "The Truman Show".
 

Arkitech

Diamond Member
Apr 13, 2000
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Originally posted by: Thera
Everything new these days seem to be McMansions, I'm not sure if that's the proper name though, only what I've heard them called.

Good call, McMansion is an appropriate description. I really don't care much for modern homes
 

Linflas

Lifer
Jan 30, 2001
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Kind of depends on what part of the country you are in I think. Here in Virginia Colonial, French Colonial, and Dutch Colonial by far the most common. You see the occasional Southwest style or contemporary but they are rare enough to really stand out when you see one.
 

T2T III

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
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That home for $169K looks great. I watch a bit of HGTV and on their show "Curb Appeal" they do have an arts and craft style homes from time-to-time. I think they are quite unique looking. Also, the famouse "Sears" houses from the early 1900s are pretty neat, too. I've seen a few of those and they have held up well. Here's a link to some of the plans for the Sears houses:

http://architecture.about.com/library/bl-bungalowplan-sears.htm
 

Bulk Beef

Diamond Member
Aug 14, 2001
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Originally posted by: Arkitech
Originally posted by: Thera
Everything new these days seem to be McMansions, I'm not sure if that's the proper name though, only what I've heard them called.

Good call, McMansion is an appropriate description. I really don't care much for modern homes
Those houses are horrible. My parents live in an affluent DC suburb, and developers are buying houses on their street for a million plus, just to tear down the houses that are there and build these monstrosities that get as close to the property line as the law allows. I call them Monuments to Conspicuous Consumption.
 

Arkitech

Diamond Member
Apr 13, 2000
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Originally posted by: Tiles2Tech
That home for $169K looks great. I watch a bit of HGTV and on their show "Curb Appeal" they do have an arts and craft style homes from time-to-time. I think they are quite unique looking. Also, the famouse "Sears" houses from the early 1900s are pretty neat, too. I've seen a few of those and they have held up well. Here's a link to some of the plans for the Sears houses:

http://architecture.about.com/library/bl-bungalowplan-sears.htm

Wow that's an interesting link, I would kill to build homes like for those prices today. I'd like to see one of those places in person
 

Arkitech

Diamond Member
Apr 13, 2000
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Originally posted by: sward666
Originally posted by: Arkitech
Originally posted by: Thera
Everything new these days seem to be McMansions, I'm not sure if that's the proper name though, only what I've heard them called.

Good call, McMansion is an appropriate description. I really don't care much for modern homes
Those houses are horrible. My parents live in an affluent DC suburb, and developers are buying houses on their street for a million plus, just to tear down the houses that are there and build these monstrosities that get as close to the property line as the law allows. I call them Monuments to Conspicuous Consumption.

ughh that's sickening, I wish more counties would pass ordinances to make it tougher for developers. most of these home builders are slapping these cheap homes together for a fast buck and structures are'nt really made to last. I've seen quite a few new homes where the drywall is cracking, shingles are missing from the roof, plumbing is faulty, etc.. Quality is definitely missing in a lot of new homes these days
 

Homerboy

Lifer
Mar 1, 2000
30,856
4,974
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agree 200% on this topic. Modern, cookie cutter houses are simply horrible.

My wife and I live in a nice "older" part of town with houses ranging from the 20-50's. Cape cods, bungalos, tudors, arts and crafts you name it... and the diversity, architecture, design and craftsmanship is simply amazing.

Meanwhile 20mins west of us, further from the city every... and I mean EVERY farm is being purchased up and leveled (well a farm is already pretty flat but you know what I mean) and these cookie cutter, beige cedar siding houses in pre-planned subdivisions are sprouting up. They are required to have IDENTICAL mailboxes, lamp posts etc in their yard. Its not that there is little diversity, its that there is NO diversity at all.

While I do envy these people on some level for having a nice new house with "no" problems (as opposed to the countless "nuiances" found in our 60yr old Cape Cod) I feel like I'm in some sort of sanitized clean room when Im in theri house. There is no personality, no "feeling", no warmth at all... no matter how they may decorate it.

Ours? Natural woodwork throughout, hardwood floors, real plaster walls, crown molding throughout... you name it.

There are SOME modern houses being built with personality and design, but its a matter of cost. I've seen a few new houses I would LOVE to move into with double fireplaces, wrap around porches etc etc... but the price is astronomical.... I guess that is why the cookie cutters exist, but I still dont want them.
 

T2T III

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
12,899
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Originally posted by: Homerboy
While I do envy these people on some level for having a nice new house with "no" problems (as opposed to the countless "nuiances" found in our 60yr old Cape Cod) I feel like I'm in some sort of sanitized clean room when Im in theri house. There is no personality, no "feeling", no warmth at all... no matter how they may decorate it.
Actually, most of the new houses are not free of problems. I could follow builders around fixing their "problems" that they created. With most houses, the sub-contractors who do the tile work are not even aware that when using grout on tile gaps bigger than 1/8", they should be using sanded grout. So, after the homeowner has called the builder and the subs back a few times ... only to not get the issue properly corrected, I end up getting the work.

The list of "issues" with new houses could go on and on. I've decided that if I were to have a new place built, I'd act as the general contractor to supervise the sub-contractors and I'd still do my own bathrooms - on big area where lots of mistakes are created.