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Question What generation of Intel CPUs has support Intel Bridge Technology?

Harry_Wild

Senior member
Dec 14, 2012
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I was wonder if my Intel Haswell CPU 4790 will run Windows 11? I think it may be a 4th generation CPU! Does it have Intel Bridge Technology inside it?

”Intel Bridge Technology is a runtime post-compiler that enables applications
to run natively on x86-based devices, including running those applications on
Windows. Intel’s multi-architecture XPU strategy provides the right engines
for the right workloads by integrating leading CPU cores, graphics technology,
artificial intelligence accelerators, image processors and more, in a single,
verified solution.”
 

Hitman928

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Apr 15, 2012
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My understanding is that the Intel Bridge Technology is just software/compiler so any (at least relatively modern) x86-64 CPU will work, including those from AMD. Your Haswell CPU should be fine.
 

Zucker2k

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Feb 15, 2006
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What I hear may be needed is TPM 2.0 compliance, however, people with older processors like yours have been able to install the leaked build with little effort. No way to know how things will look in the final product.
 

Harry_Wild

Senior member
Dec 14, 2012
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What I hear may be needed is TPM 2.0 compliance, however, people with older processors like yours have been able to install the leaked build with little effort. No way to know how things will look in the final product.
  • TPM stands for “Trusted Platform Module”. It’s a chip on your computer’s motherboard that helps enable tamper-resistant full-disk encryption without requiring extremely long passphrases. What Is It, Exactly? The TPM is a chip that’s part of your computer’s motherboard — if you bought an off-the-shelf PC, it’s soldered onto the motherboard.

Hope it not a chip on the motherboard! Somebody here should know!
 

Harry_Wild

Senior member
Dec 14, 2012
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Found out that 2017 PC and later are the qualifying for Windows 11 upgrade which will start in 2022.

Now, conflicting info it might be any PC run Windows 10.
 
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Thala

Golden Member
Nov 12, 2014
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Intel Bridge Technology is just a SW bridge, which translates ARM -> x86_64. It is necessary for x86 based devices to run Android ARM and ARM64 apps under the recently announced Windows Subsystem for Android. Of course Windows ARM devices like the Surface Pro X do not need this, as they will run Android ARM apps natively.
 

Topweasel

Diamond Member
Oct 19, 2000
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  • TPM stands for “Trusted Platform Module”. It’s a chip on your computer’s motherboard that helps enable tamper-resistant full-disk encryption without requiring extremely long passphrases. What Is It, Exactly? The TPM is a chip that’s part of your computer’s motherboard — if you bought an off-the-shelf PC, it’s soldered onto the motherboard.

Hope it not a chip on the motherboard! Somebody here should know!
It is a chip on the motherboard. It allows for the storage of challenge information for drive encryption or other security lock outs. So while all CPUs support it, whether or not it's implemented is all up to the MB manufacturer. For the longest time it was only used by OEMs on prebuilt business desktops and laptops.
 

Hitman928

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Apr 15, 2012
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Here's the official Intel CPU Support List:

Edit: For Core processors, support starts from 8th Gen and above.
I don't see any technical reason why 6th and 7th gen CPUs wouldn't be supported as well as they are all the same architecture. In terms of features, I also don't see any reason not to support back to at least Haswell. On the AMD side, they show support for Zen1+ CPUs but not Zen1 which makes no sense as there weren't any feature updates with Zen1+. I'm guessing the list is not a complete and exhaustive list. If it is, then Microsoft is making some very arbitrary decisions on which CPUs to support and it will be especially stupid if they enforce that list at install time. I also expect the TPM 2.0 requirement to be somehow relaxed in the end as that would eliminate a lot of perfectly capable DiY boxes from the list, but I guess we'll see.
 
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Zucker2k

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I don't see any technical reason why 6th and 7th gen CPUs wouldn't be supported as well as they are all the same architecture. In terms of features, I also don't see any reason not to support back to at least Haswell. On the AMD side, they show support for Zen1+ CPUs but not Zen1 which makes no sense as there weren't any feature updates with Zen1+. I'm guessing the list is not a complete and exhaustive list. If it is, then Microsoft is making some very arbitrary decisions on which CPUs to support and it will be especially stupid if they enforce that list at install time. I also expect the TPM 2.0 requirement to be somehow relaxed in the end as that would eliminate a lot of perfectly capable DiY boxes from the list, but I guess we'll see.
Here's a list of requirements:
Feature-specific requirements for Windows 11
Some features in Windows 11 have increased requirements beyond those listed above in the minimum requirements section. Below are some additional details regarding requirements for key features:
  • 5G support requires 5G capable modem.
  • Auto HDR requires an HDR monitor.
  • BitLocker to Go requires a USB flash drive (available in Windows Pro and above editions).
  • Client Hyper-V requires a processor with second level address translation (SLAT) capabilities (available in Windows Pro and above editions).
  • Cortana requires a microphone and speaker and is currently available on Windows 11 for Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Spain, United Kingdom and United States.
  • DirectStorage requires an NVMe SSD to store and run games that use the "Standard NVM Express Controller" driver and a DirectX12 GPU with Shader Model 6.0 support.
  • DirectX 12 Ultimate is available with supported games and graphics chips.
  • Presence requires sensor that can detect human distance from device or intent to interact with device.
  • Intelligent Video Conferencing requires video camera, microphone and speaker (audio output).
  • Multiple Voice Assistant (MVA) requires a microphone and speaker.
  • Snap three-column layouts require a screen that is 1920 effective pixels or greater in width.
  • Mute/Unmute from Taskbar requires video camera, microphone and speaker (audio output). App must be compatible with feature to enable global mute/unmute.
  • Spatial Sound requires supporting hardware and software.
  • Teams requires video camera, microphone and speaker (audio output).
  • Touch requires a screen or monitor that supports multi-touch.
  • Two-factor Authentication requires use of PIN, biometric (fingerprint reader or illuminated infrared camera), or a phone with Wi-Fi or Bluetooth capabilities.
  • Voice Typing requires a PC with a microphone.
  • Wake on Voice requires Modern Standby power model and microphone.
  • Wi-Fi 6E requires new WLAN IHV hardware and driver and a Wi-Fi 6E capable AP/router.
  • Windows Hello requires a camera configured for near infrared (IR) imaging or fingerprint reader for biometric authentication. Devices without biometric sensors can use Windows Hello with a PIN or portable Microsoft compatible security key.
  • Windows Projection requires a display adapter which supports Windows Display Driver Model (WDDM) 2.0 and a Wi-Fi adapter that supports Wi-Fi Direct.
  • Xbox (app) requires an Xbox Live account, which is not available in all regions. See Xbox Live Countries and Regions for the most up-to-date information on availability. Some features in the Xbox app will require an active Xbox Game Pass subscription. Learn more about the pass.
Someone mentioned the fact that MS may be trying to weed out processors without hardware mitigation fixes from all the recent security threats. It should also free MS from having to concentrate a lot of effort in mitigating these threats, with the help of chip manufacturers, of course.
 
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Hitman928

Diamond Member
Apr 15, 2012
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Here's a list of requirements:

Someone mentioned the fact that MS may be trying to weed out processors without hardware mitigation fixes from all the recent security threats. It should also free MS from having to concentrate a lot of effort in mitigating these threats, with the help of chip manufacturers, of course.
That extra list is completely optional features.

There are no hardware mitigations in the 8th gen core series or in Zen1+ (that wasn't already present in Zen1) so that can't be the defining attribute. Again, between Zen1+ and Zen1, there are no new features. Between the different release gens of Skylake, there were no new uarch features. To support one gen but not the others makes no sense from a technical point of view.
 

Zucker2k

Golden Member
Feb 15, 2006
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That extra list is completely optional features.

There are no hardware mitigations in the 8th gen core series or in Zen1+ (that wasn't already present in Zen1) so that can't be the defining attribute. Again, between Zen1+ and Zen1, there are no new features. Between the different release gens of Skylake, there were no new uarch features. To support one gen but not the others makes no sense from a technical point of view.
Yeah, I think this is just Microsoft's way of controlling its ecosystem, ala Apple, plus avoiding supporting a thousand x86 processors on Windows 11.
 

Harry_Wild

Senior member
Dec 14, 2012
416
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91
I found out that my PC is out of the running for Windows 11 upgrade for multiple factors:

1. Has to be an approved 8th generation class Intel CPU(AMD are similar generation).

2. Even if it passes cpu, you need to have software based TPM or hardware TPM 2.0.

I just hope MS just forgets the TPM 2.0 requirement. It not, a 3rd party vendor will come to a rescue with an add on solution through PCI, USB, SATA, etc.. Or a resourceful hacker come up with an answer. I beating on hackers now! Go hackers!:)

If after a year and no easy way to get Windows 11 Pro loaded up. I going to hire a professional hacker to make possible. Remember, the saying: "Anything can be hacked."
 
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Harry_Wild

Senior member
Dec 14, 2012
416
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91
If anybody wonder what the current generation right now at for Intel:

Rocket Lake has arrived. Intel confirmed that 11th-gen desktop chips were on their way back in October and teased the new processors at CES in January, but it wasn't until March 2021 that they officially went on sale.
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
9,953
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If after a year and no easy way to get Windows 11 Pro loaded up. I going to hire a professional hacker to make possible. Remember, the saying: "Anything can be hacked."
Wouldn't it just be cheaper to buy a new machine? Or just stick with Windows 10. You are getting another 4 years of support, it's not like it's going out of support tomorrow.
 

AnitaPeterson

Diamond Member
Apr 24, 2001
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I found out that my PC is out of the running for Windows 11 upgrade for multiple factors:

1. Has to be an approved 8th generation class Intel CPU(AMD are similar generation).

2. Even if it passes cpu, you need to have software based TPM or hardware TPM 2.0.

I just hope MS just forgets the TPM 2.0 requirement. It not, a 3rd party vendor will come to a rescue with an add on solution through PCI, USB, SATA, etc.. Or a resourceful hacker come up with an answer. I beating on hackers now! Go hackers!:)

If after a year and no easy way to get Windows 11 Pro loaded up. I going to hire a professional hacker to make possible. Remember, the saying: "Anything can be hacked."

You can already install Windows 11 with very little effort... the services of a hacker are not required.

Please check out the video posted in the Windows 11 thread (post 44):

 

NTMBK

Diamond Member
Nov 14, 2011
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Looks like Microsoft added Zen1 and 7th gen Core CPUs to the supported list.
Is there any good reason why 7th Gen and not 6th Gen would be supported? As far as I'm aware, Kabylake was just a respin of Skylake with higher clocks.

(My Skylake desktop would be sad to get left out!)
 

Hitman928

Diamond Member
Apr 15, 2012
3,622
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Is there any good reason why 7th Gen and not 6th Gen would be supported? As far as I'm aware, Kabylake was just a respin of Skylake with higher clocks.

(My Skylake desktop would be sad to get left out!)
Not that I'm aware of. Just as they reportedly are adding these 2 new generations of support, hopefully they continue to do so for CPUs that have no technical reason not to be supported, but we'll see.
 

DisEnchantment

Senior member
Mar 3, 2017
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What is funny about this is that about a week after Windows announced support for Android apps, Google dropped this

  • Play Feature Delivery: Used by more than 10% of the top apps using app bundles, Play Feature Delivery gives you the ability to customize what feature modules are delivered to which device and when, with install-time, conditional, and on-demand delivery modes.
  • Play Asset Delivery: Reduces user waiting time by dynamically delivering large assets while cutting delivery costs. Games using Play Asset Delivery can use texture compression format targeting, so your users only get the assets suitable for their device, with no wasted space or bandwidth.
At the moment I don't know if Microsoft will allow a Playstore in Windows, might need to run GMS :)
But with AAB, you cannot pull APKs directly to Windows anymore without the dev having to do additional work
Tim Epic is already furious
 
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