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What do you expect the turnout numbers to be today?

aphex

Moderator<br>All Things Apple
Moderator
Jul 19, 2001
38,572
2
81
Think we can get back over the 60% we used to see 40-50 years ago?
 

dphantom

Diamond Member
Jan 14, 2005
4,511
140
106
I hope so. I fail to understand why our voting percentage is so low compared to other countries. Here is our best opportunity to validate the incumbent or change direction yet upwards of 40%+ simply stay home and are apathetic to the outcome. Yet the outcome will directly affect every American.
 

miketheidiot

Lifer
Sep 3, 2004
11,062
1
0
Originally posted by: dphantom
I hope so. I fail to understand why our voting percentage is so low compared to other countries. Here is our best opportunity to validate the incumbent or change direction yet upwards of 40%+ simply stay home and are apathetic to the outcome. Yet the outcome will directly affect every American.
our voting mechanism is idfficult (we all know the reasons) and 2 party system leaves lots of people without prefered candidates
 

Lemon law

Lifer
Nov 6, 2005
20,984
2
0
Some one correct me if I am wrong, but I think the voter percentage that actually voted was something on the order of 40% in 2004. If there were no political difference between the voted and not voted group, turnout would be a wash on election outcome, but still, its a sad commentary on the sad State of the American Voter, being given the gift and right to vote, and then ducking their responsibility.

Given the fact voter turnout is historically low, all political parties hope to get out large percentages of their base while hoping their opponents are an apathetic and dispirited bunch.

The other consideration is that those who do not usually vote will mostly trend young and democratic, which is why the GOP is not thrilled with any unbiased voter registration drives or a large turnout. I am guessing at least a 60% turnout.
 

jonks

Lifer
Feb 7, 2005
13,918
18
81
Originally posted by: Lemon law
Some one correct me if I am wrong, but I think the voter percentage that actually voted was something on the order of 40% in 2004.
Roughly 120 million votes were cast in 2004 which is about 40% of the total US population, but the entire US population can't vote, i.e. everyone under 18. Take out the minors and others disqualified from voting and you get 60%.
 

MikeyLSU

Platinum Member
Dec 21, 2005
2,747
0
71
Originally posted by: Lemon law
Some one correct me if I am wrong, but I think the voter percentage that actually voted was something on the order of 40% in 2004. If there were no political difference between the voted and not voted group, turnout would be a wash on election outcome, but still, its a sad commentary on the sad State of the American Voter, being given the gift and right to vote, and then ducking their responsibility.

Given the fact voter turnout is historically low, all political parties hope to get out large percentages of their base while hoping their opponents are an apathetic and dispirited bunch.

The other consideration is that those who do not usually vote will mostly trend young and democratic, which is why the GOP is not thrilled with any unbiased voter registration drives or a large turnout. I am guessing at least a 60% turnout.
that seems to be a common theme. I decided to look up past voter turnouts and in the past century there is no correlation between high voter turnout and a particular party winning the election.
 

aphex

Moderator<br>All Things Apple
Moderator
Jul 19, 2001
38,572
2
81
Fox just reported that 132 million people voted, or 64.1%. Amazing.
 

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