What disc brakes should I get?? 2004 bmw z4

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TechBoyJK

Lifer
Oct 17, 2002
16,701
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When I last changed my brake pads, my disks had some life left on them. Now they sound like they need to go, and i measured their width, and its past the recommended point.

I've been thinking about getting some kind of slotted disk. Is it worth it? I know how it works, it helps dissipate heat, and lowers brake fade, but is it necessary? I "hot rod" in my car every now and then, it's fun, and I'm probably harder on the brakes than I would be in a normal car. I don't take it to the track though. At least I haven't yet, and if I did, it would probably only be for 1/4 mile times and maybe some laps. Nothing crazy. It's my daily driver, not a weekend warrior.

I also like the way the slotted disks look, since I do have 19" m6 wheels on it, which exposes much of the brake assembly. I'm actually going to try to paint some of the assembly black next time I have a chance.

I'd at least like to get "BMW" quality stuff, disks that are as good as what came with it from the factory.

Here's a link to what my options pretty much are. I'd prefer to spend less than $200, but if I will get significantly more life and better performance from a better disk and I should spend more than $200, I will consider it. I'd like to avoid spending any more money than I have to though, so if the cheapest disks are probably just fine then I will probably do that.

http://cpwstore.carpartswholesale.c...4294964440+4294963888+4294967124&PN=9179&sv=0
 

canadageek

Senior member
Dec 28, 2004
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Slotted/drilled rotors aren't going to do much for you. Just invest in some decent pads, a set of braided steel lines, and some basic rotors. there isn't really much braking performance to be gained by your choice of rotors, they're all the same material.
 

Demo24

Diamond Member
Aug 5, 2004
8,357
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I'm not entirely convinced of the advantages of slotted rotors, at least not for a street vehicle. I would just get some decent blanks, some good pads, and call it a day. Might as well change the brake fluid while your at it.
 

nismotigerwvu

Golden Member
May 13, 2004
1,568
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I'm not entirely convinced of the advantages of slotted rotors, at least not for a street vehicle. I would just get some decent blanks, some good pads, and call it a day. Might as well change the brake fluid while your at it.

This

Unless you live on top of a mountain with the only means off being a super twisty personal drive. In which case the forum will be over to run time trials :)
 

JulesMaximus

No Lifer
Jul 3, 2003
74,459
854
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How do the brakes perform now? If they perform well now (as they should on any BMW) then why mess with it? Just get some decent quality rotors and good pads.
 

Vette73

Lifer
Jul 5, 2000
21,503
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A good all round pad is the Wagner ThermoQuiet Brake Pads.

Better performance then a all ceramic pad but less dust then a full metallic pad.
You can get them at Advance or rockauto.com
RA is usually cheaper and has a 5% coupon code that can be found at fatwallet. Also a good place for filters and other items you may need.

The ThermoQuiet pads, front, for your car ar RA are $39 and they also have oil filters for less then $5 for your car as well. Front rotors are less then $34 each.
 
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exdeath

Lifer
Jan 29, 2004
13,679
10
81
Brembo blanks are about the best you can get for a street car and are probably OEM for your car.

Slotted or drilled rotors sacrifice surface area and reduce braking effectiveness, but allow the brakes to be used hard repeatedly without gassing and fading. While preferred for appearances only on a street car, they reduce braking slightly and are prone to cracking, but won't be used enough to reap any benefits. Slotted rotors will also eat your pads in quick time.

What you do want if you have nice open wheels is a rotor that is zinc plated to prevent hub and vent rusting. If you really want to go all out on looks and maintenance free rust prevention and don't care about spending money, 2 pc rotors with anodized aluminum hubs.

If you really want drilled or slotted rotors for appearance, go with drilled. They are weaker and more prone to cracking than slotted, but street driving is unlikely to create the kind of abuse and heat that causes cracking, and they won't chew up your pads as bad as slotted.
 
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