What can I use to power this device?

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by LumbergTech, Nov 9, 2012.

  1. LumbergTech

    LumbergTech Diamond Member

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    I have a device that has slots for two prongs on the back. The top prong hole is rounded on the bottom and the bottom prong is entirely square. The sticker next to the power plug says INPUT 12V 4 5a.

    What can I use to power this thing?

    Can I use like a regular laptop plug?

    I imagine that the actual adapter for this device looks something like this: (at least the prongs)

    http://azsurplus.com/images/YX-4116101.jpg
     
    #1 LumbergTech, Nov 9, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2012
  2. MichaelD

    MichaelD Lifer

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    What device is this? 12V @ 4.5 AMPS is NOT typical of your usual "wal-wart" power supply. For walwarts, 6.0-12.0v @ 1 amp (or 1000MA) is typically "the high end" of what you'll see. That said, other than finding a walwart with that kind of output and soldering on the appropriate connector, you could buy a "bench power supply" that typically has a variable output of 6.0-25.0v @ up to 10 amps, but they aren't cheap.

    Curious as to what this device is. Pics?
     
  3. JackMDS

    JackMDS Super Moderator<BR>Elite Member
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    The device indicates input of 220VAC.

    I.e, if you are in the USA or any other place that provides 110VAC from the wall it is Not a good idea to use it.

    Otherwise, it seems to be a 12VDC 250MA power plug.

    Such a device worth "pennies" and there is No reason to risk anything using it unless you are on one of the "TV Lost" episode and that is the only thing that you have.


    :cool:
     
  4. mfenn

    mfenn Elite Member <br> Currently on <BR> Moderator Sabb
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    I don't think that pic was meant to be the exact AC adapter, just an example one one with the right sort of plug.

    Anyway, OP your device is only about 54W, which is well within the range of a normal laptop style AC adapter. I'm not sure what MichaelD is concerned about, unless he mentally saw 120V. Here's one for $13 that has the spec that you need. Just cut the DC barrel plug off and wire up the appropriate connector.
     
  5. MichaelD

    MichaelD Lifer

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    The OP states "Input 12V/4.5A". Hence my comments about 4.5A being an unusually high current draw for a 12V device, unless we're talking about car stereo amps/equipment. But if it was mobile audio equipment it wouldn't have a funky-looking plug like that.
     
    #5 MichaelD, Nov 10, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2012
  6. mfenn

    mfenn Elite Member <br> Currently on <BR> Moderator Sabb
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    That's the thing, I don't think that 4.5A is really all that high. For example, the AC adapter for the smallest (80W) PicoPSU is 6.6A at 12V.
     
  7. MichaelD

    MichaelD Lifer

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    Hmm, good point. :colbert: I guess I was in the mindset of "walwart-only power supplies) and while I've never seen a typical 5v-12v walwart with more than about 1.5A, you're right about laptop/pico PS bricks. They are rated 6A+. I dunno...I'm no EE. ;)