What 1080p Editing Card for Lowest Heat & Noise During Presentations?

chane

Member
Apr 18, 2010
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I'm still a no-hands on newbie with video editing so I'll be much more into reading, posting and asking than will be buying anything for a while. But systems like this one seems much more appropriate for something like Vegas Pro than Cyberlink Producer 18,

https://diyvideoeditor.com/cyberlink-powerdirector-review/

https://www.tomsguide.com/reviews/cyberlink-powerdirector-18

https://www.pcmag.com/reviews/cyberlink-powerdirector

which presumably is less resource hungry than Vegas Pro, which may be overkill for my needs anyway.


I never do any gaming and would only be doing 1080p blu ray movie editing; no 4K BD movies. I heard it said that the Ryzen cpus are somehow better for video editing than the Comet lake (?) Intel i7. If yes, why?

As a movie collector, most of my video editing will involve the ~ 17% of DVDs and BDs in my collection that include one or two objectionably violent or loud scenes, which I'd want to cut out or attenuate, respectively, and then burn the finished job to BD-RE. Presumably, PowerDirector 18 would allow me to do this to a decrypted BD movie quite
easily.

But as I would eventually want to make my desktop pc the center of my home theatre I am concerned about heat and especially noise during playback. Would the Quadro® P2200 5GB card included in that pricy (?) system above-or if installed in most desktop cases using large diameter fans and/or passive coolers-make appreciable noise and heat when playing a 1080p BD movie on JRiver player in a 13 ft x 14 ft room?

Much more than 18db at ~ 6 ft?

Why no reviews on that card?

But can anyone suggest an especially good video card for my needs?
 

Staples

Diamond Member
Oct 28, 2001
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I use PowerDirector 365 (subscription version and thus up to date).

Those enterprise cards are very niche and thus do not get many reviews.

My system is an i5 8600K and 1660 Super. I've never had a Ryzen CPU but I hear that PD doesn't use them efficiently even though they are technically faster than Intel CPUs.

I used to have an RX580 but those RX cards have a problem with a certain plugin in PD if you render in 1080p, So avoid AMD RX and Vega class cards. I do not know if newer AMD cards have this problem.

My recommendation would be i7 9700K and 1660 Super or 2080 if you want to spend a lot of money. The card I have is quiet but the 2080 uses more power and thus hotter. Remember, the video card is doing the bulk of the work and not the CPU.
 

chane

Member
Apr 18, 2010
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I use PowerDirector 365 (subscription version and thus up to date).

Those enterprise cards are very niche and thus do not get many reviews.

My system is an i5 8600K and 1660 Super. I've never had a Ryzen CPU but I hear that PD doesn't use them efficiently even though they are technically faster than Intel CPUs.

I used to have an RX580 but those RX cards have a problem with a certain plugin in PD if you render in 1080p, So avoid AMD RX and Vega class cards. I do not know if newer AMD cards have this problem.

My recommendation would be i7 9700K and 1660 Super or 2080 if you want to spend a lot of money. The card I have is quiet but the 2080 uses more power and thus hotter. Remember, the video card is doing the bulk of the work and not the CPU.
With your system hardware and PD365 have you ever done the kinds of jobs that I described? That is, simple scene deletion from a decrypted commercial BD movie or unencrypted BD home movie?

If yes, how long did it usually take for your GPU to render the images before or after you made the scene cuts?

Did the GPU make a lot of hot air during the renderings?

And did the fan noise level also increase a lot?

But I see that you have a "gaming" card.
https://www.newegg.com/p/pl?N=100007709 601346498

Do you do gaming on that system a lot more than editing?

Might there be other cards that are better tuned instead for video editing than for gaming and therefore might produce less noise while rendering images during editing job?

In any case, when simply playing a BD movie anywhere from 30 minutes to its full length, did the heat
and noise level from your card ever get high enough to be annoying or distracting?
 

Staples

Diamond Member
Oct 28, 2001
4,880
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91
I’ve never decrypted a BD movie in my life. Blu Ray movies took a lot of horsepower 10 years ago to play but it is almost effortless for modern GPU which have chips that are specially designed to decode AVC video.

I only play one game and that is call of Duty. I play it probably 10 hours a week. I just make the occasional video for family or YouTube but still manage to spend hours a week inside the video editor.

ive never looked into how well the Quattro cards stack up for video rendering. But if you want to, you will probably only find benchmarks for Avid and Premiere because they have the biggest professional market share. I do not think Power Director is used by many people who are willing to spend big bucks on hardware for video.

During playback, a modern GPU will not break a sweat so you will not have to worry about fan noise. While rendering, they run at almost full power so I can imagine their fans would go hard if they are not properly ventilated. Alas, this card I use never seems to get loud. I don’t even notice it. The RX580 on the other hand, that one gets loud.
 

chane

Member
Apr 18, 2010
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I’ve never decrypted a BD movie in my life. Blu Ray movies took a lot of horsepower 10 years ago to play but it is almost effortless for modern GPU which have chips that are specially designed to decode AVC video. I only play one game and that is call of Duty. I play it probably 10 hours a week. I just make the occasional video for family or YouTube but still manage to spend hours a week inside the video editor.

ive never looked into how well the Quattro cards stack up for video rendering. But if you want to, you will probably only find benchmarks for Avid and Premiere because they have the biggest professional market share. I do not think Power Director is used by many people who are willing to spend big bucks on hardware for video.

During playback, a modern GPU will not break a sweat so you will not have to worry about fan noise. While rendering, they run at almost full power so I can imagine their fans would go hard if they are not properly ventilated. Alas, this card I use never seems to get loud. I don’t even notice it. The RX580 on the other hand, that one gets loud.
Very informative reply, thanks! I have not yet either decrypted a BD movie but if and when I do I won’t suffer any guilt since it would be a movie I had purchased for my personal collection. Besides, unlike other nations (Germany I think), it’s legal in the US to decrypt and make one (edited) copy of a DVD or BD movie, and one BD-RE copy is all I would need to edit the movie for my own viewing pleasure.

Ah-ha, so like that RX580, it’s probably the AMD cards that may be less suitable for movie editing than for gaming. So unless that’s an old card could that be why it gets loud when rendering 1080p content, compared to the “Cuda”, or other Nvidia cards?

Have you ever edited non-protected 1080p content (e.g. home movies) on your system with PowerDirector?

If yes, how long did it usually take your Nvidia 1660 GPU to render “frames” (?) ?
 

Staples

Diamond Member
Oct 28, 2001
4,880
70
91
Ah-ha, so like that RX580, it’s probably the AMD cards that may be less suitable for movie editing than for gaming. So unless that’s an old card could that be why it gets loud when rendering 1080p content, compared to the “Cuda”, or other Nvidia cards?
The RX580 isn't that old. A few years. It doesn't get loud when playing back anything because it does not stress it much but when encoding a video or playing game, it can get loud because it uses a lot of power and gets hot. The more heat it generates, the faster (and louder) the fans need to be in order to adequately cool it.

Have you ever edited non-protected 1080p content (e.g. home movies) on your system with PowerDirector?
If yes, how long did it usually take your Nvidia 1660 GPU to render “frames” (?) ?
Sure, I edit and export many videos from camera, smartphone and gopro video captures. I find that the 1660 Super is 30% on average faster than the RX580 when encoding a video. Of course everything depends on bit rate so exporting a movie to file varies widely. But usually exporting a video with a high bit rate will take less time than the video is. So if you have a video that is 10 minutes long, it could take 5-8 minutes to render into HEVC format. Faster than that for h264 format.
 

Headfoot

Diamond Member
Feb 28, 2008
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Noise level is a function of the type of fan the specific graphics card. Look up reviews for the graphics card - it is not as related to the specific model as you think. There are some very fast high end cards that use a lot of power which are still very quiet because they have very good fans on them

The 1080 Ti I own is the fastest and most power hungry card of its family and because I got a really nice fan version from MSI (Armor line) it is the quietest card I've ever owned
 

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