WESTERN DIGITAL SHIPPING 80 GB-PER-PLATTER TECHNOLOGY THAT YIELDS 250 GB HARD DRIVES

Adul

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Oct 9, 1999
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danny.tangtam.com
LAKE FOREST, Calif. - Jan. 21, 2003 -Western Digital Corp. (NYSE: WDC) today announced that it is shipping its next-generation 80 GB-per-platter technology, which yields PC hard drives that can store up to 250 GB. This new hard drive technology adds 25% capacity to Western Digital's popular WD Caviar® 200 GB hard drive, which was based on 67 GB-per-platter technology.

WD Caviar 7,200 RPM 80 GB-per-platter hard drives began shipping last month. WD Caviar 80-per-platter GB hard drives are offered in single and multi-platter designs in capacities of 80, 120, 160, 200 and 250 GB. By leveraging its 80 GB-per-platter technology to 83 GB-per-platter and using three platters, Western Digital is able to achieve 250 GB capacity. Shipment of the multi-platter hard drives, including the flagship WD Caviar 250 GB, is expected next month.

WD Caviar Special Edition hard drives equipped with 80 GB-per-platter technology is anticipated to be available next month. These drives feature an 8 MB cache size, which is four times larger than the industry standard 2 MB cache size and are covered under warranty for a three-year period.

"Western Digital continues to offer the high performance and large capacity demanded by its customers by offering a quarter terabyte of storage in its successful WD Caviar product," said Dave Reinsel, research manager at market research firm IDC. "The shift to 80 GB-per-platter technology is an important transition for the hard drive industry that will have a long-lasting impact and provide end users a broad range of capacities to meet their storage needs."

"Maintaining its focused approach of providing the highest quality, performance and reliability to its customers, Western Digital is delivering 80 GB-per-platter technology now that the platform meets these important standards," said Richard E. Rutledge, vice president of marketing at Western Digital. "Eighty GB-per-platter, combined with our unique expertise in high capacity 7,200 RPM hard drives, is now the best technology to bring to market the next-generation biggest and fastest hard drives."


http://www.wdc.com/company/releases/PressRelease.asp?release=1450
 

pm

Elite Member Mobile Devices
Jan 25, 2000
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One wonders how much longer they will keep up this pace. HD manufacturers make Moore's Law look easy. If transistors are doubling every two years, how fast are hard drive capacities increasing?

Nice to see the 3 year warranty.
 

Adul

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Oct 9, 1999
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danny.tangtam.com
Originally posted by: pm
One wonders how much longer they will keep up this pace. HD manufacturers make Moore's Law look easy. If transistors are doubling every two years, how fast are hard drive capacities increasing?

Nice to see the 3 year warranty.

yes it is, but that is the 8MB cache drives only. never-the-less next time I upgrade I want one :D
 

SafeZone

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Oct 17, 2002
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so the bigger the platter size, the better the performance right?

I have a WD 80GB SE 8mb cache drive....wondering, how many platters does that have in it, and what size are they?

what if they made an 80gb drive with just one of those new 80gb platters, would it be faster than the current 80gb SE drives?
 

Lord Evermore

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Oct 10, 1999
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240GB wasn't enough? They had to "leverage" the technology to get an extra 3GB per platter? What did they do, make the platters just SLIGHTLY wider but still able to fit in a 3.5 inch drive? Maybe "lever" has more than one connotation in this case. :)
 

DaveSimmons

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Aug 12, 2001
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Cool, this should help drive down the price of 200 GB drives too. I need about 400 GB of storage to rip my music collection to lossless FLAC format. 1,200 true-CD-quality CD rips online, woohoo!

[ ed ] and another 400 to mirror it on another PC. Hmm, if I wait another year I can do this on 1 HD :D
 

BeauJangles

Lifer
Aug 26, 2001
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Originally posted by: Adul
Originally posted by: pm
One wonders how much longer they will keep up this pace. HD manufacturers make Moore's Law look easy. If transistors are doubling every two years, how fast are hard drive capacities increasing?

Nice to see the 3 year warranty.

yes it is, but that is the 8MB cache drives only. never-the-less next time I upgrade I want one :D

One? I'm getting four! ~1 TB of storage :D
 

CTho9305

Elite Member
Jul 26, 2000
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Originally posted by: BlinderBomber
Originally posted by: Adul
Originally posted by: pm
One wonders how much longer they will keep up this pace. HD manufacturers make Moore's Law look easy. If transistors are doubling every two years, how fast are hard drive capacities increasing?

Nice to see the 3 year warranty.

yes it is, but that is the 8MB cache drives only. never-the-less next time I upgrade I want one :D

One? I'm getting four! ~1 TB of storage :D

With that much data, you might consider getting a fifth to RAID5 for more reliability ;)
 

Ipno

Golden Member
Apr 30, 2001
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Let me throw out the obligitory:

"Why do you even need so much space! I am perfectly fine on my 386 with its 20 meg hard drive, you are all gluttons!"

before someone else does.


;)
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
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Originally posted by: pm
One wonders how much longer they will keep up this pace. HD manufacturers make Moore's Law look easy. If transistors are doubling every two years, how fast are hard drive capacities increasing?

Nice to see the 3 year warranty.

mid 1997 saw 4 platter 6.4 gig drives with 4 platters... 1.6 per platter... 6 years later we're at 80 per platter... 50x densities in 6 years, not bad. moore's law is 16x for the same period.
 

bgeh

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Nov 16, 2001
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Originally posted by: Ipno
Let me throw out the obligitory:

"Why do you even need so much space! I am perfectly fine on my 386 with its 20 meg hard drive, you are all gluttons!"

before someone else does.


;)

quoting Bill Gates "640K ought to be enough for anybody";)

:)
 

RobCur

Banned
Oct 4, 2002
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More platter is not good, hotter, and slower access time. if they use only one platter say 200GB or 300GB which will be extremely dense, then it will be very, very fast even on 5400 rpm. I had a seagate 2.1GB about 525mb per plate, using 4 plates was a very bad idea. Excessive heat caused it to have bad cluster in short period of use like a month and I threw it away LOL

 

dakels

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Nov 20, 2002
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Originally posted by: BlinderBomber
One? I'm getting four! ~1 TB of storage :D
:) amazing.

Not too long ago people would have scoffed at the idea of putting 1 terabyte of capacity in an end user machine, especially only using the ATA controller on the MB. Its funny, even my Mac can hold 1.5 terabytes now with internal storage and a single PCI ATA card. 5-6 years ago I remember building a SCSI array that cost about $15k, 6 drives, and held about 110gb and we thought it was impressive.
 

CTho9305

Elite Member
Jul 26, 2000
9,214
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Originally posted by: dakels
Originally posted by: BlinderBomber
One? I'm getting four! ~1 TB of storage :D
:) amazing.

Not too long ago people would have scoffed at the idea of putting 1 terabyte of capacity in an end user machine, especially only using the ATA controller on the MB. Its funny, even my Mac can hold 1.5 terabytes now with internal storage and a single PCI ATA card. 5-6 years ago I remember building a SCSI array that cost about $15k, 6 drives, and held about 110gb and we thought it was impressive.

I don't know which is which (-h vs. -H), so have both:
me@tera_~_$_df_-H
Filesystem_____________Size___Used__Avail_Use%_Mounted_on
.....
/dev/md0______________1.2TB__351GB__797GB__31%_/home/tera
.....
me@tera_~_$_df_-h
Filesystem____________Size__Used_Avail_Use%_Mounted_on
......
/dev/md0______________1.1T__327G__743G__31%_/home/tera
......
cst@tera_cst_$

One of my friends boxes :)
 

Barnaby W. Füi

Elite Member
Aug 14, 2001
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I don't know which is which (-h vs. -H), so have both:

-h is "human friendly" numbers, -H shows the FS type. rtfm, newbie ;) :p

personally i only have about 12GB of data i care about, most of it mp3's, it's just a PITA to back up on to cd. i don't need a bigger hard drive, i need a dvd burner!
 

Spac3d

Banned
Jul 3, 2001
6,651
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Originally posted by: CTho9305
Originally posted by: dakels
Originally posted by: BlinderBomber
One? I'm getting four! ~1 TB of storage :D
:) amazing.

Not too long ago people would have scoffed at the idea of putting 1 terabyte of capacity in an end user machine, especially only using the ATA controller on the MB. Its funny, even my Mac can hold 1.5 terabytes now with internal storage and a single PCI ATA card. 5-6 years ago I remember building a SCSI array that cost about $15k, 6 drives, and held about 110gb and we thought it was impressive.

I don't know which is which (-h vs. -H), so have both:
me@tera_~_$_df_-H
Filesystem_____________Size___Used__Avail_Use%_Mounted_on
.....
/dev/md0______________1.2TB__351GB__797GB__31%_/home/tera
.....
me@tera_~_$_df_-h
Filesystem____________Size__Used_Avail_Use%_Mounted_on
......
/dev/md0______________1.1T__327G__743G__31%_/home/tera
......
cst@tera_cst_$

One of my friends boxes :)

Why would you ever have 1 tb of space if you are only using 30%. That is the stupidest thing I have read all day. I have 420gb of spacea nd I have something like 5% free. Time to buy another 160gb :D

Spac3d
 

Atlantean

Diamond Member
May 2, 2001
5,296
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Maxtor is already shipping 250gb harddrives. Not sure if they are 80 gb per platter though.
 

sharkeeper

Lifer
Jan 13, 2001
10,886
2
0
240GB wasn't enough? They had to "leverage" the technology to get an extra 3GB per platter? What did they do, make the platters just SLIGHTLY wider but still able to fit in a 3.5 inch drive? Maybe "lever" has more than one connotation in this case. :)

Flagship models will use the same media, they will have smaller defect tables. It's like putting 670 MB on a 650 MB CD-R.

Cheers!