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Went on a bike ride this weekend....

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DaShen

Lifer
Dec 1, 2000
10,710
1
0
Originally posted by: UTmtnbiker
Originally posted by: DaShen
Thanks. And specs on the Michelin ProRace 2's?
I'd say this is one of the top 2 tires for performance, rolling resistance, and traction out there.

I liked the Specialized Mondo's but I'd definately ride this and the Conti 4000's as my 2 training and race tires over pretty much anythign else on the market.

Take a look at probikekit as they rate the tires based on 5 point criteria. This gets a 4 or 5 on everything except for cost of tire.[/quote]

Continental 4000's? How do you like them? I have heard from some people that they still prefer the Attack-Force because on the turns they seem a little more responsive.

4000 vs. ProRace2?
 

DaShen

Lifer
Dec 1, 2000
10,710
1
0
Originally posted by: Mursilis
A little of everything - even some MTB races. But I was never higher than a Cat. 4. Unfortunately, there's no place in racing for the 'casual' rider - to race, you've got to be hardcore, or forget about it. With a job, house, 4 kids, etc., I've got no time to train 2+ hours a day. But I still ride when I can.
I know how you feel. It is really hard to get into the sport because you have to work your way up the categories. So you have to show up to a lot of Cat5 and Cat4s just to be considered Cat3 or Cat2 material. I don't have that time. Some people are so good that they get pushed into Cat2/3 very quick (like Lance).

Have you ever done Cyclocross? I can't wait till it gets popular in Houston. I have gone Mountain biking in a long time though.
 

Mursilis

Diamond Member
Mar 11, 2001
7,756
11
81
Originally posted by: DaShen
Originally posted by: Mursilis
Originally posted by: DaShen
Originally posted by: Mursilis
To go off on another tangent . . .
I went across the pond in '01 to follow (and ride part of the route) Le Tour, and it was hot as blazes that year in the Pyrennes. I got tons of flats that trip from the rim heating up (combination of heat from atmosphere and heat from hard braking going down those mountains) and blowing the tubes. But it was a great trip. If you ever get the chance, go over there to see the Tour in person, and take your bike. Until you've ridden some of those legendary climbs, you can't really appreciate just how tough those guys are.
I plan on doing that in 3-4 years.
I used Graham Watson Sporting Tours (UK-based). Google 'em - they've got a great website, and lots of tour options. They also do the Giro and Veulta, some of the Classics, etc. They're not the most luxurious tour provider (unlike Velosport and some of the US-based ones), but the accomodations were decent enough, and my brother and I were able to do a 14-day trip with the money we saved - got to see all the big stages in both the Pyrennes and Alps. Trip of a lifetime.
I will definitely check it out, I have been looking at Velosports with a friend of mine. I am all up for just renting a touring bike and sleeping in tents, but my friends would never go for that. pLus security wise, that isn't the safest option.

Graham Watson Sporting Tours, hwo much would it cost if you don't mind me asking?
My memory is hazy about the cost, but I think it was ~$1500 or less (which doesn't count the flight to London - trip begins at pick-up in the UK). That included accommodations and transportation for self and bike (big bus pulling a trailer - like I said, nothing fancy). Plus, they gave you a cue sheet w/ various ride options for the day. For meals, you were usually on your own. The bus itself would usually go to a pick-up point along the Tour route, so you could be lazy a day or two and not ride at all, and still see the stage. Usually, at least one of the guides would also ride. But they're a big company, and they've got several tour options for Le Tour. I enjoyed using them, and would do so again.
 
Feb 10, 2000
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I've always found Conti tires (particularly Grand Prixs) are way too prone to sidewall damage and cuts. They also ride harsher than most of their competition. I like the way the brown sidewall Contis look, but they are not great tires generally IMO.
 

Mursilis

Diamond Member
Mar 11, 2001
7,756
11
81
Originally posted by: DaShen
Originally posted by: Mursilis
A little of everything - even some MTB races. But I was never higher than a Cat. 4. Unfortunately, there's no place in racing for the 'casual' rider - to race, you've got to be hardcore, or forget about it. With a job, house, 4 kids, etc., I've got no time to train 2+ hours a day. But I still ride when I can.
I know how you feel. It is really hard to get into the sport because you have to work your way up the categories. So you have to show up to a lot of Cat5 and Cat4s just to be considered Cat3 or Cat2 material. I don't have that time. Some people are so good that they get pushed into Cat2/3 very quick (like Lance).

Have you ever done Cyclocross? I can't wait till it gets popular in Houston. I have gone Mountain biking in a long time though.
Haven't tried pure cyclocross, but I did a cyclocross-style race on a MTB. It was fun, but one painful hour . . .
 

DaShen

Lifer
Dec 1, 2000
10,710
1
0
Originally posted by: Mursilis
Originally posted by: DaShen
Originally posted by: Mursilis
Originally posted by: DaShen
Originally posted by: Mursilis
To go off on another tangent . . .
I went across the pond in '01 to follow (and ride part of the route) Le Tour, and it was hot as blazes that year in the Pyrennes. I got tons of flats that trip from the rim heating up (combination of heat from atmosphere and heat from hard braking going down those mountains) and blowing the tubes. But it was a great trip. If you ever get the chance, go over there to see the Tour in person, and take your bike. Until you've ridden some of those legendary climbs, you can't really appreciate just how tough those guys are.
I plan on doing that in 3-4 years.
I used Graham Watson Sporting Tours (UK-based). Google 'em - they've got a great website, and lots of tour options. They also do the Giro and Veulta, some of the Classics, etc. They're not the most luxurious tour provider (unlike Velosport and some of the US-based ones), but the accomodations were decent enough, and my brother and I were able to do a 14-day trip with the money we saved - got to see all the big stages in both the Pyrennes and Alps. Trip of a lifetime.
I will definitely check it out, I have been looking at Velosports with a friend of mine. I am all up for just renting a touring bike and sleeping in tents, but my friends would never go for that. pLus security wise, that isn't the safest option.

Graham Watson Sporting Tours, hwo much would it cost if you don't mind me asking?
My memory is hazy about the cost, but I think it was ~$1500 or less (which doesn't count the flight to London - trip begins at pick-up in the UK). That included accommodations and transportation for self and bike (big bus pulling a trailer - like I said, nothing fancy). Plus, they gave you a cue sheet w/ various ride options for the day. For meals, you were usually on your own. The bus itself would usually go to a pick-up point along the Tour route, so you could be lazy a day or two and not ride at all, and still see the stage. Usually, at least one of the guides would also ride. But they're a big company, and they've got several tour options for Le Tour. I enjoyed using them, and would do so again.
That is awesome. :)

I know they have another group that riders the every Tour stage the day before the stage begins, but you actually have to try out for that group.
 

Mursilis

Diamond Member
Mar 11, 2001
7,756
11
81
Originally posted by: DaShen

That is awesome. :)
It was a great price. Check 'em out.

I know they have another group that riders the every Tour stage the day before the stage begins, but you actually have to try out for that group.
I think that's called the L'etape or something like that. You don't have to try out for it, but you do have to get tickets, which are limited. GW Sporting Tours also has a tour built around doing that (they even get the tickets for you!), but you'd better be in shape - the organizers usually pick a challenging stage for L'etape. Still, it would be great to ride a complete Tour stage. Just riding part of the route is awesome. There's so many interesting fans/riders you'll see out on the road, and everyone's cheering you on, etc. It's awesome for cycling fans.
 

Eltano1

Golden Member
Aug 6, 2000
1,897
0
0
Interesting thread, we (my wife and I) have Trek 7100 and my two boys 7200. We go two to three times per week, in the afternoon (too hot here in Miami) to ride around the golf course, for about one hr (just trying to be in shape), now I need to convince them to go to the trail. :)

Eltano
 

DaShen

Lifer
Dec 1, 2000
10,710
1
0
Originally posted by: Mursilis
Originally posted by: DaShen

That is awesome. :)
It was a great price. Check 'em out.

I know they have another group that riders the every Tour stage the day before the stage begins, but you actually have to try out for that group.
I think that's called the L'etape or something like that. You don't have to try out for it, but you do have to get tickets, which are limited. GW Sporting Tours also has a tour built around doing that (they even get the tickets for you!), but you'd better be in shape - the organizers usually pick a challenging stage for L'etape. Still, it would be great to ride a complete Tour stage. Just riding part of the route is awesome. There's so many interesting fans/riders you'll see out on the road, and everyone's cheering you on, etc. It's awesome for cycling fans.
I think the cost is about $4500 though, which I really can't spend all that much unless I saved up for a while.
 

Mursilis

Diamond Member
Mar 11, 2001
7,756
11
81
Edited my prior post - the tour company's name was Graham Baxter Sporting Tours, and here's the link: Text.
 

Mursilis

Diamond Member
Mar 11, 2001
7,756
11
81
Originally posted by: DaShen
I think the cost is about $4500 though, which I really can't spend all that much unless I saved up for a while.
I just checked the site, and a 12-day trip similar to what I took in '01 (including all mountain stages) is only ~$2100. Seems to include most meals now, too. Check the "Mountains - all stages (standard)" trip. That's not bad at all.
 

DaShen

Lifer
Dec 1, 2000
10,710
1
0
Originally posted by: Mursilis
Edited my prior post - the tour company's name was Graham Baxter Sporting Tours, and here's the link: Text.
Thanks

Originally posted by: Mursilis
Originally posted by: DaShen
I think the cost is about $4500 though, which I really can't spend all that much unless I saved up for a while.
I just checked the site, and a 12-day trip similar to what I took in '01 (including all mountain stages) is only ~$2100. Seems to include most meals now, too. Check the "Mountains - all stages (standard)" trip. That's not bad at all.
Velonews had a thing for the whole tour for $4500.

$2100 is a lot more doable. :)
 

Mursilis

Diamond Member
Mar 11, 2001
7,756
11
81
Originally posted by: DaShen
Originally posted by: Mursilis
Edited my prior post - the tour company's name was Graham Baxter Sporting Tours, and here's the link: Text.
Thanks

Originally posted by: Mursilis
Originally posted by: DaShen
I think the cost is about $4500 though, which I really can't spend all that much unless I saved up for a while.
I just checked the site, and a 12-day trip similar to what I took in '01 (including all mountain stages) is only ~$2100. Seems to include most meals now, too. Check the "Mountains - all stages (standard)" trip. That's not bad at all.
Velonews had a thing for the whole tour for $4500.

$2100 is a lot more doable. :)
Well, plus transport to London for pick-up, and home from wherever the tour ends (usually Paris).
PM for more info if you have any further questions.
 

JulesMaximus

No Lifer
Jul 3, 2003
74,182
635
126
I have Michelin Pro Race 2s on my LeMond Zurich. I have about 800 miles on them and they've been fine. I think I've had 2 flats with them. They seem to be wearing fine, I've rotated them once already.

I had Specialized Mondo Pros on another bike and put about 1200 miles on them but had to replace the rear due to tread wear (I didn't rotate them and the center of the tire became squared off).
 

JulesMaximus

No Lifer
Jul 3, 2003
74,182
635
126
Originally posted by: Paulson
I just got a flat in my road bike as well... was bout 10 miles out of town and the tire just went down :(

Farthest I've done for the season was a 32 mile bike ride...

And yes, there is such a thing as it being too hot. I usually carry a backpack with a lot of water (usually 4 or 5 32 oz bottles of water) and I still find it very very hard to ride in some of this humidity (I live in Minnesota, where it can get humid as hell.)
I did 22 miles yesterday morning and it was in the mid 80s by the time I got home. Fairly humid here as well. I only had one bottle with Cytomax in it.

I rode 110 miles the week prior over 4 days.
 

DaShen

Lifer
Dec 1, 2000
10,710
1
0
Originally posted by: JulesMaximus
Originally posted by: Paulson
I just got a flat in my road bike as well... was bout 10 miles out of town and the tire just went down :(

Farthest I've done for the season was a 32 mile bike ride...

And yes, there is such a thing as it being too hot. I usually carry a backpack with a lot of water (usually 4 or 5 32 oz bottles of water) and I still find it very very hard to ride in some of this humidity (I live in Minnesota, where it can get humid as hell.)
I did 22 miles yesterday morning and it was in the mid 80s by the time I got home. Fairly humid here as well. I only had one bottle with Cytomax in it.

I rode 110 miles the week prior over 4 days.
Yeah, not a good idea to only have one water bottle during this time of the season, even on a 22 mile ride. It does depend on what time you ride on. I am a big proponent of sponsored rides being conducted during the nightime or early early 3-4am rides. Because in Houston mid-day, if you run out of water on a long ride, you better stop by a gas station and have some cash on you or you are screwed.

**EDIT**
So it looks like I will be getting Michelin ProRace 2 tires. :)
 

JulesMaximus

No Lifer
Jul 3, 2003
74,182
635
126
Originally posted by: DaShen
Originally posted by: JulesMaximus
Originally posted by: Paulson
I just got a flat in my road bike as well... was bout 10 miles out of town and the tire just went down :(

Farthest I've done for the season was a 32 mile bike ride...

And yes, there is such a thing as it being too hot. I usually carry a backpack with a lot of water (usually 4 or 5 32 oz bottles of water) and I still find it very very hard to ride in some of this humidity (I live in Minnesota, where it can get humid as hell.)
I did 22 miles yesterday morning and it was in the mid 80s by the time I got home. Fairly humid here as well. I only had one bottle with Cytomax in it.

I rode 110 miles the week prior over 4 days.
Yeah, not a good idea to only have one water bottle during this time of the season, even on a 22 mile ride. It does depend on what time you ride on. I am a big proponent of sponsored rides being conducted during the nightime or early early 3-4am rides. Because in Houston mid-day, if you run out of water on a long ride, you better stop by a gas station and have some cash on you or you are screwed.

**EDIT**
So it looks like I will be getting Michelin ProRace 2 tires. :)
Yeah, I picked them up on sale at Performance Bike for $29.95 each IIRC. Definitely a good value for the money. I should have bought a couple spares but I wasn't sure how they would last. I'd definitely buy them again now that I've got some mileage on them.

Edit-I rode 40 miles on Saturday a couple weeks ago with one water bottle with just water in it. I did stop and refill with water but I was pretty well worn out by the time I got home. I hadn't really planned on riding as far as I did though.

I am conditioning myself to ride a century in September. It will be my first one.
 

freegeeks

Diamond Member
May 7, 2001
5,460
1
71
I use continental grand prix 3000 and I'm very happy with them

I've been going to the Tour for the last few years to watch the mountain stages but this year i'm going to skip it. The crowds are absolutely crazy and it's impossible to find a decent parking spot and getting from the mountain afterwards is an absolute nightmare

I'm going back to to the Alps the end of august to do some more riding (Mont Ventoux, Alpe D'Huez, ...) :thumbsup:
 

UTmtnbiker

Diamond Member
Nov 17, 2000
4,129
4
81
I only rode 2 times between Wednesday of last week and yesterday due to the high heat (about 100 degrees). Although we're fortunate enough to live in a low humidity state, we've been having wildfires like crazy and there's been an air quality alert all of last week. That in itself makes it an easy choice not to ride, regardless of temperature.

That being said, I generally go by time on the saddle to determine how many bottles I'll need. I try to get 1 bottle per hour, so usually on a 25 to 40 mile ride, I'll take two, and I usually end up with about 1/2 bottle left by the end of a ride. I did 27 miles yesterday and polished off one bottle and about half of another one and then at the end of the ride, had a full bottle of gatorade at the house. Felt fine, but like I said, we're in a state where 10% humidity is considered muggy. Other thing I usually do that helps out is a energy bar/gel per hour to hour and a half in the saddle. I usually take a Cliff Bar with me on a ride like I did yesterday and eat it at the turn around point. I've found this helps with feeling spent also.
 

Dirigible

Diamond Member
Apr 26, 2006
5,947
13
81
Originally posted by: JulesMaximus

I am conditioning myself to ride a century in September. It will be my first one.
Excellent, have fun in your century!

I've been amazed at the people that ride in them. Last year in different centuries I saw an 80-year old guy on a mountain bike with knobbies and a severly overweight woman wearing a gold lame outfit. I chatted with both before passing. They were both determined to finish, no matter how long it took them or how slowly they went. I hope they did.
 

JulesMaximus

No Lifer
Jul 3, 2003
74,182
635
126
Originally posted by: Dirigible
Originally posted by: JulesMaximus

I am conditioning myself to ride a century in September. It will be my first one.
Excellent, have fun in your century!

I've been amazed at the people that ride in them. Last year in different centuries I saw an 80-year old guy on a mountain bike with knobbies and a severly overweight woman wearing a gold lame outfit. I chatted with both before passing. They were both determined to finish, no matter how long it took them or how slowly they went. I hope they did.
I'll be happy if I can finish it in under 7 hours-should be doable. There is a 2 mile climb coming at about mile 80 though...I'm not looking forward to that. :laugh:
 

radioouman

Diamond Member
Nov 4, 2002
8,632
0
0
Wife and I did 40 miles last weekend. We both have mountain bikes. It was a great ride!
 

Dessert Tears

Golden Member
Feb 27, 2005
1,100
0
0
I guess I'm late to the discussion, but here's my input:

An earlier post re: rolling resistance tests (some discussion follows):
http://forums.anandtech.com/messageview.aspx?catid=38&threadid=1852558#23206262

Originally posted by: UTmtnbiker
Michelin ProRace 2's from probikekit.com - about $27 including credit card conversion fees, and they're faster than Performance or Nashbar in getting stuff to you even though they're located in the UK. Great tires for a dirt cheap price considering if you go to a LBS, they'll be around $50/tire.
This is a good price. Performance had them for $44 (I didn't buy them) when I made an order last week.

Originally posted by: DaShen
Originally posted by: Mursilis
Originally posted by: DaShen
**EDIT**
Oh BTW, performance and speed is important to me, so gatorskins or armidillo 25+mm tires is not an option.
Yes, but really, how much of a difference does 3mm really make? I don't know, but I'd bet it's probably minimal. Either way, I do know changing flats on the road sucks, and I've done it countless times. Besides, don't most Euro-pros run 23-25mm tires anyway - something about more rubber for cornering, and slightly more cushion for those 100+ mile days in the saddle?
You would be surprised at how much 3mm makes on a 60+ mile ride. It could be the difference of 1-2 mph and a lot of energy saved. Also, I have found that on my nice tires, my sprints have been incredibly zippy. Seriously, tyou should try it out.
I don't remember where I read this (Pez, probably, this review at CyclingNews alludes to it), but I can find a link if there's interest. Narrower tires are more aerodynamic, and wider tires have lower rolling resistance. Rolling resistance is fixed regardless of speed, and air resistance is proportional to v^2. There is no resistance-minimizing tire width for all riders - it depends on cruising speed and somewhat on rider weight.
 

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