Wear latex/nitrile gloves under winter gloves keeps your hands warmer??

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by TheNinja, Jan 21, 2010.

  1. TheNinja

    TheNinja Lifer

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    I was reading an article about a wide receiver in football that wear latax gloves under this receiving gloves. I was wondering if this might work for winter sports as well. I would think it would help for 3 main reasons but I really don't know.

    1. Keep the inside of your winter gloves from getting wet
    2. Keep cold moisture soaking through from the outside of your gloves
    3. Act like a wetsuit for your hands and keep warm/sweat air and moisture on your hands without allowing the heat to escape.

    Would this work??
     
  2. 0roo0roo

    0roo0roo No Lifer

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    nitrile maybe
    latex tears so fast that it would be rather pointless in sports.
     
  3. Ika

    Ika Lifer

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    It will kind of work, but your hands will still be cold if your outer gloves aren't thick enough, and then they will be clammy due to the extra moisture trapped inside.
     
  4. TheNinja

    TheNinja Lifer

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    I was just thinking for like snow skiing or snow tubing/sledding when it's really cold and wet.
     
  5. TheNinja

    TheNinja Lifer

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    That's the other thing I was kind of wondering. If you have all that moisture around your hands and that moisture gets cold, it's going to be 5x worse than dry cold hands I would think.
     
  6. Tiamat

    Tiamat Lifer

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    prob not easy to do, but i was think the nitrile gloves over the normal gloves would act to deter wind from penetrating the glove. For me, its usually the wind that chills my fingers down and not just sheer cold temperatures. The glove would absorb any moisture off of your hands like normal.
     
  7. lxskllr

    lxskllr Lifer

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    Plastic over gloves wick the heat away from your hands. I got frost nip on my fingers once due to a duct tape repair. I also have some mechanics gloves with plastic wear guards on the finger tips, and I can feel the cold at those points. Your best bet is wool liners with leather shells. The leather blocks the wind, and woll can hold up to 80% of it's weight in water, and still insulate.
     
  8. kami333

    kami333 Diamond Member

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    Also if you wear latex gloves all the time you may end up developing latex sensitivity/allergy (happens a lot in research).
     
  9. herm0016

    herm0016 Diamond Member

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    this does work.
    i work in the oil field (outside) in Wyoming and have worked 12 hour shifts at 20 below F. we would use our nitril gloves under our cotton work gloves. It will keep your hands warmer because it is a vapor barrier. a lot of hikers do this with vapor barrier socks, gloves, and even sleeping bag liners. your hands will get clammy and i would only wear them if it really is extremely cold. anything above about 5 below i would not wear them, and not for long periods of time. we would only wear them when we were not in our work trailer.
     
  10. DrPizza

    DrPizza Administrator Elite Member Goat Whisperer
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    Your hands don't get wet skiing, unless you suck at it. :)
     
  11. Red Squirrel

    Red Squirrel Lifer

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    I think it could maybe work, similar concept as having a vapor barrier over insulation before you put drywall up.
     
  12. Bateluer

    Bateluer Lifer

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    I was considering something like this while running in Florida during the freeze spell earlier this month, to keep the wind off my hands. Not a big deal in Phoenix, but useful for others.
     
  13. RU482

    RU482 Lifer

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    I'ma try it wit muh dong an git back to ya
     
  14. Analog

    Analog Lifer

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    I question the effectiveness of this. I've hunted in pretty cold weather, and hiked in cold weather (well below freezing). We always try to keep the surface of the skin dry, whether foot or hand. Using pure wool is a great insulator. The problem is, that it is itchy and it can make your skin sweat. Most of us then put a thin silk or polypropylene undersock or thin glove underneath the wool. The purpose of that is to wick the moisture off your skin, keeping it dry. Therefore, the whole nitrile thing seems like it would make you sweat more, I would find that uncomfortable.
     
  15. zinfamous

    zinfamous No Lifer

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    our nitrile gloves at the lab tear almost as soon as I put them on. shitty piece of crap gloves.

    :(
     
  16. zinfamous

    zinfamous No Lifer

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    this man speaks the truth. After 4 or so years, I now stay away from latex.
     
  17. Miramonti

    Miramonti Lifer

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    Cowards are great at keeping their gloves dry on the slopes. ;)
     
  18. sdifox

    sdifox No Lifer

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    some people have sweaty hand.