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Colt45

Lifer
Apr 18, 2001
19,721
0
0
Originally posted by: Craig234
Originally posted by: Farang
Originally posted by: CanOWorms
Originally posted by: techs
Shocking how little respect FDR gets today.
He deserves no respect due to what he did to the Japanese-Americans.
Every great president had a fascist streak in them.
What was JFK's fascist streak? I disagree. And the internment of the Japanese was not fascist, you need a different pejorative label for it (paranoid, tyrannical?)
Authoritarian.
 

Craig234

Lifer
May 1, 2006
38,548
345
126
Originally posted by: Colt45
Originally posted by: Craig234
Originally posted by: Farang
Originally posted by: CanOWorms
Originally posted by: techs
Shocking how little respect FDR gets today.
He deserves no respect due to what he did to the Japanese-Americans.
Every great president had a fascist streak in them.
What was JFK's fascist streak? I disagree. And the internment of the Japanese was not fascist, you need a different pejorative label for it (paranoid, tyrannical?)
Authoritarian.
Except that I don't think that really fits, either. See the post above for some info why.

I think his policies broadly reflected a respect for the people and civil liberties.

For example, see this speech foran example of how he asked the media to use caution on national security issues.

Compare the tone of that speech - telling them how much he valued the criticisms they offered for his mistakes - with, say, the attitude from Bush.

The Southerners who faced his marshalls forcing them to let blacks attend college might see him as authoritarian, but the blacks wouldn't.

The mafia who had their civil rights violated by Bobby did, but the people who were freed from Mob crimes didn't.
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,063
495
126
Originally posted by: Thump553
I grew up in Connecticut. Just about every state park facility here was built by the CCC in the Depression and they are beutiful to this day. My father and his brother worked briefly in the CCC as teens before his brother went to the service and my father nailed a full ride scholarship to a pretigious school and became the first family member to attend college. Even though I grew up in a rock-ribbed blueblood New England GOP family, I have always had a romantic view of FDR's New Deal, the CCC and the hope and vitality it gave to a desperate young generation of Americans. Remember, that was an era when older kids were asked to leave home because there was no way to feed them.
That would be because of FDR's policies of crop destruction to keep prices high. yes in the wise idea the govt felt our starvation issues were due to a lack of crops being produced because of a low price in the market. In response they go ahead and destroy millions of tons of crops and millions of heads of livestock to stimulate a shortage which will spike the price and give farmer more reason to plant more crops. The problem is all it did was cause a food shortage and starvation increased.



 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,063
495
126
Originally posted by: techs
Originally posted by: Craig234
Originally posted by: Farang
Originally posted by: CanOWorms
Originally posted by: techs
Shocking how little respect FDR gets today.
He deserves no respect due to what he did to the Japanese-Americans.
Every great president had a fascist streak in them.
What was JFK's fascist streak? I disagree. And the internment of the Japanese was not fascist, you need a different pejorative label for it (paranoid, tyrannical?)

Actually, FDR thought he was protecting the Japanese against mass murder. After Pearl Harbor many District Attornys, Police Chiefs appealed to the State of California for assistance in protecting the lives of the Japanese Americans in their districts. The Police Chiefs specifically said not only did they not have the manpower, but their deputies had already been involved with the murder of Japanese Americans.
The governor of California said he had no men, every man was needed to protect the shores against Japanese attack.
Facing rampaging mobs out to murder Japanese Americans, FDR proposed a "protective detention" which by the way is now legal in the US in many instances, such as those liable to hurt themselves, those seeking sanctuary at police stations from mobs, etc.
lmfao

Is that why we confiscated their private property, business, and belongings as well? Lets not forget the internments happened 5 months after Pearl Harbor. Where was the mass murder during this 5 months?

And lets get past one thing here. FDR's progressive ideals barely resemble anything like the progressives of today. FDR wanted to get involved in Europe and Asia. He was making deals to lock us into the eventuality of war. He was for military tribunals for enemy combatents and even denied habeas corpus to an American citizen in the process. I would say the only issue I can see they have a lot of similarities is FDR's willingness to use the govt as a blunt instrument to combat issues(real or made up). Also he listened in on every communication from outside our borders. And intstituted a censor board for war information.

So a war hawk civil rights denying big govt interventionalist?
Shit he could be considered the grand daddy for neo-con's.


 

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