Want to setup 2 home networks

jeisma

Junior Member
Dec 1, 2012
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0
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Hi,

Have a modem (that connects to my ISP's network) with 1 port that's currently connected to a wifi router.

I'm thinking of purchasing a switch that I can connect to the modem, and have at least 2 routers connect to the switch, hoping to have 2 networks.

Before I go out buying, am I correct in my assumption that a switch is what I need? Maybe I don't need to buy anything, any comments or suggestions?

TIA!
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
37,864
18,141
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You cannot connect them the way you are planning, if the modem is ONLY a modem. Sounds like it is.

You want to use subnetting or vlans to create two networks.

A switch can get you more ports on your LAN, and unmanaged switch won't pass vlan information.

How about you tell us what the two networks are going to be doing, and we can offer solutions?
 

jeisma

Junior Member
Dec 1, 2012
5
0
61
thank you for the reply.

my wireless devices are slow (like youtube buffering, etc) at times, i kind of think the wifi router is the bottleneck. there is one device that is wired to the router and it's not experiencing those slow downs.

so i thought, since i have another wifi router, i can split the network into 2. the networks don't need to see each other, only access the internet. but since the modem (Hitron CDA-RES) has only one port, i thought i need something something behind it where I can hardwire the wifi routers to.
 

JoeBleed

Golden Member
Jun 27, 2000
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for what you want, either buy a better router to replace your existing one, or buy another router that allows you to configure it as a WAP (Wireless Access Point) mode. if changing the mode doesn't remove DHCP, routing and such, you'll have to disable all of that. Change the address of the new router/WAP to something in the same range of your old router but not it's address or something in its DHCP pool. Once the second router is properly configured as a WAP, you can just plug that into your exiting router. it should passthrough everything from the router. You'll also want to put a little distance between them. You don't need much, but it generally isn't good to have them sitting on top of each other. sometimes they don't get along well.

Keep a note of both router and router/wap IP addresses, username, and passwords. Depending on the router and WAP's capabilities, roaming handoffs may not work well. But from your desired use, you'd probably would want them to have different SSIDs anyway.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
37,864
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You can get a WAP, or turn another SOHO router into a WAP, google "router as WAP" for tutorials.

You can also perform some testing using speedtest.net, and also use iperf to test between devices
 

mv2devnull

Golden Member
Apr 13, 2010
1,501
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for what you want, either buy a router ..., or buy router ...
or buy a WAP that needs no tinkering, for it has exactly one task: to act as WAP.


It is up to the ISP what you can connect to a modem. Mine, for example, offers 5 IP's but I use only one for my router. My home net is hidden behind my router. I would presume that it is more likely that an ISP allows only one IP per client. In that case a L2 switch between modem and router(s) is useless.

If you do get a device that can act as wireless access point and it is much better at it than the current one, then you probably should disable the "weak" WAP function from your current router.
 

JoeBleed

Golden Member
Jun 27, 2000
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or buy a WAP that needs no tinkering, for it has exactly one task: to act as WAP.


It is up to the ISP what you can connect to a modem. Mine, for example, offers 5 IP's but I use only one for my router. My home net is hidden behind my router. I would presume that it is more likely that an ISP allows only one IP per client. In that case a L2 switch between modem and router(s) is useless.

If you do get a device that can act as wireless access point and it is much better at it than the current one, then you probably should disable the "weak" WAP function from your current router.

I suggested buying another router simply because cheap routers are cheaper than cheap WAPs. Not sure if OP already has a second router or not.

In the case that an ISP may allow more than one IP connection, the OP would then have his devices on networks that don't talk to each other. You can make them, but it will be a lot of work that i gather the OP isn't up to doing given they're asking this question. But again, if you already had a second router, might as well make use of it in your existing network.

If i were going to be using a general store bought router, i would prefer just one decent wireless router and only use a second/WAP if i needed more coverage area.
 

jeisma

Junior Member
Dec 1, 2012
5
0
61
ouch. from the responses, i see it's quite a work.

someone raised the topic about IP address. why would that matter? my ISP sees me thru the cable modem? don't they? so i get only one IP.

if i can manage to connect routers that broadcast's private address it don't matter to them (ISP). does it?

so apparently, what i'm wanting is not plug n play. :-(

Code:
device 1..3 --- wifi router 1 --
                                -> switch -> cable modem -> ISP -> internet
devcie 4..n --- wifi router 2 --


thank you all for the responses.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
37,864
18,141
146
Calm down, it's not too bad. The problem being described to you is when you setup two Soho routers that are confined to be on the same subnet, giving out IP's on the same subnet, etc... Just make the second one a WAP, disabling DHCP, dns, and give it a static IP on the LAN subnet from the first router.
 

jeisma

Junior Member
Dec 1, 2012
5
0
61
uuhhmm.. if i understand it correctly, that would appear like this:

Code:
device 1..n --> router 2 --> router 1 --> cable modem --> ISP -- > internet

so all data would still pass thru router 1?

my goal was to balance the load between the 2 routers. i imagine, i'd have 2 SSIDs. 2 networks.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
37,864
18,141
146
uuhhmm.. if i understand it correctly, that would appear like this:

Code:
device 1..n --> router 2 --> router 1 --> cable modem --> ISP -- > internet

so all data would still pass thru router 1?

my goal was to balance the load between the 2 routers. i imagine, i'd have 2 SSIDs. 2 networks.

Not feasible. You're either chasing a problem that doesn't exist, or your router 1 is underpowered for your use, slowly dying, or having software problems.

You need to figure out what's going on first. When you notice the slow down, start at speed test.net, and then iperf between a LAN device and a WLAN device having problems
 
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JoeBleed

Golden Member
Jun 27, 2000
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What size of area are you trying to cover with your existing router? what model is it? is it centrally placed in the area you're trying to cover?