Question Video Graphics Assistance/ Need Video Card

synoptic12

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Seeking assistance relating to the purchase of a compatible graphics card. Currently have a HP Pavilion HP 6370t CTO with MS-7613 (Iona-GL8E) motherboard > American Megatrends Inc 5.15, 6/25/2010 > Processor Intel ® Core i5 CPU 650 @ 3.20GHZ, 2 Core(s), 4 Logical. Current video graphics Nvidia GT220 (OEM).

I am seeking some information regarding the purchase of a video card that I need. I currently have a GT220 Nvidia but it needs replacement. Contacted EVGA as the tech said the graphics card would be contingent upon the (UEFI). He said it may or may not work. My PC is going on ten years (HP Pavilion- P6370t). The motherboard is MS-7613 (Iona-GL8E). I am trying to acquire information as to whether this board supports UEFI. What graphics cards can I use. Bios Version/ Date: American Megatrends Inc 5.15, 6/25/2010. All replies are very much appreciated. I am in need of a graphics card.

Have received much controversy in varying opinions, different techs state different things. Looking for a PCIe 2.0 x16 Single socket. All information or assistance is very much appreciated.



 

Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
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To be honest, I'd recommend grabbing something like a 750ti 2GB for that kind of box. I've used them in systems of that age and even older (x58/i7-920 and C2Q-9550/x38) for example).

+You can find them secondhand very cheap.

+They use little power and won't overwhelm your PSU

+They're not bulky and will easily fit your case

+It's a good match for your CPU performance, you won't leave performance on the table at all

+It's a monumental upgrade over your old 220

+It will give you great video output options (DVI + Displayport + HDMI) and support 4k/30 and 4k/24 for HD accelerated video playback.
 
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Arkaign

Lifer
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Thank you very much. Can I find anything new, such as EVGA? Looking for 2.0x16 - single socket- 64 bit. I believe the card you are speaking is 128 bit.
Hi! The 128-bit listed for the 750ti refers to the onboard memory bus width, it is still a standard PCIe x16 3.0/2.0/1.1 compatible card.

I'm sure there is some new old stock 750ti out there. I'll take a look.
 
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Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
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Forget the bits, they don't make PCIe slots different for different bits :) It refers ONLY to the interface on the card itself between the GPU and onboard VRAM. You can use 64, 128, 192, 256, 384, 512 bit cards all on any PCIe x16 slot.

In the video you posted, you'll have no trouble with a wider card, just not a very long one. It will be larger by about an inch further inside the case, but will have plenty of clearance going by your video there. You will have to remove the slat cover in the next slot over. Don't be intimidated, it's easy.
 
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Arkaign

Lifer
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The performance gap is immense as well.

A GT 710 is 122Gflops (.12 TF)
A GTX 750ti is 1400Gflops (1.4TF)

More than 13x faster.

For reference from the old one

A GT 220 is 72Gflops

*-64-bit FP
 
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synoptic12

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Thanks very much. Is the card a single slot? I'm looking for plug and play. I currently have a GT220 Nvidia but it needs replacement. Contacted EVGA as the tech said the graphics card would be contingent upon the (UEFI). He said it may or may not work. My PC is going on ten years (HP Pavilion- P6370t). The motherboard is MS-7613 (Iona-GL8E). I am trying to acquire information as to whether this board supports UEFI. What graphics cards can I use. Bios Version/ Date: American Megatrends Inc 5.15, 6/25/2010. All replies are very much appreciated. I am in need of a graphics card. On tech said the cards are backward compatible 3.0 to 2.0 as well as UEFI. Is that information correct?

* Then another tech said it would be with what cpu I have adjoined to the BIOS. The world has become a place of complete confusion. I've received at least three versions as to protocol.
 

synoptic12

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So, is that the only option? You are more adept at graphics than I. Will the card work and will the BIOS or UEFI be a factor? By the way, I am not gaming: do not play games. Rather audio and video editing are my forte, if that matters.
 

Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
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Haha I understand the confusion for sure. But don't be intimidated, it's not so hard. I've been working on PCs since the 1980s, across tens of thousands of units and probably into the hundreds of thousands of components by now.

Whichever S1156 CPU you have doesn't matter. i3, i5, i7, no problem.

Same with the bit width of the card.

Now it's true that some newer cards (like RX460/560/GT1030/etc) can sometimes not play nice with older bioses.

To be extra safe, that's why an older model like the 750ti is a good bet. Most of these do not require a supplemental 6-pin PCIe power connector, work with legacy BIOS, and are very power efficient. Your stock 300W unit will have no trouble.

It's just a matter of downloading the new driver, and physically swapping the cards.
 
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Arkaign

Lifer
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Note : the concerns about the UEFI situation deal with problems that arise when you combine an old Mobo (that predates UEFI standard) with a brand new GPU that requires UEFI compliant boards to operate. Because your board is from 2010 and hasn't seen a BIOS update in nearly a decade, this is why you want to make sure you pick a card that doesn't require UEFI to run. (eg; GT/GTX 700 series or older).
 
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synoptic12

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So, can you provide a card for me? Is the card you mentioned require UEFI or not?
Here are some links to my initial problem if you care to read. Why is my graphics card working now and what could be the issue? I very much appreciate the support you have provided. I’ve been at this for a few days, must get some sleep. Ill check back tomorrow. Thank you very much, most appreciated.


 

Arkaign

Lifer
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Yes, it will work. Nvidia Maxwell and older GPUs do not require UEFI-compliant motherboards to work.

So Nvidia 200 series, 300 series (OEM rebadge of 200 series, not a real release), 400 series, 500 series, 600 series, 700 series will all work.

710 is fine. It is less than 10% the performance of a 750ti, but if you literally do nothing with video performance demands, it will be no big deal either way.

The big thing you want to avoid is :

Newer than 700 series
And cards that require PCIe supplemental power connectors. Such as 760/770/etc

Given the choice between a $50 710 and $60-70 750ti, I'd have a hard time refusing a 750ti, you get a lot more capability for the money, but either will solve your problem and even the 710 is a minor upgrade from the 220.

However, your MSI H57 motherboard has onboard video that will work if you simply remove the 220 if you have a VGA cable for your monitor. If you do not need performance, it is more than capable of regular windows operation.

None of the cards mentioned between 200-700 series require UEFI, and all will work for you.
 
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synoptic12

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Thank you very much for the professional support you have elaborated upon. I have not seen in any of the forums such detailed factual technical support. One issue, as calling Nvidia and EVGA, I believe that the techs stated that the 700 series employed UEFI. How could these techs not know of the platform features? You are very much knowledgeable regarding the system I'm operating. The prices are somewhat high for a graphics card.

* One point of contention that I have not mentioned, or at least I do not think I have is, ' The GT220 is 16X as opposed to 8x with the 700 series. Would this be an issue? Again, I'm looking for 'plug and play' with no interference with sockets. The GT220 is a single socket.

I know you must be busy, but did you have a chance to look at the threads from Bleeping Computer? I cannot determine the problem of the black screen or know if it is associated with the video card or something else. I very much appreciate the professional support. In the interim, I'm contacting a friend who has a computer business with a possible solution. I cannot thank you enough.
 

synoptic12

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I've used this exact one many times because it works great on older computers with or without UEFI support:


No fan to possibly go bad either.
* Thanks very much. I was looking at that card but was hesitant on having no fan and being MSI. I'm unaware of the warranty or how well the drivers are. EVGA provides a three (3) year warranty; unknown as to MSI's Warranty and Support.

* I'm somewhat familiar with heat sinks and have concerns of the heat dissipating inside the case. This is why I believe a fan is more useful (IMO).
 
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daveybrat

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* Thanks very much. I was looking at that card but was hesitant on having no fan and being MSI. I'm unaware of the warranty or how well the drivers are. EVGA provides a three (3) year warranty; unknown as to MSI's Warranty and Support.

* I'm somewhat familiar with heat sinks and have concerns of the heat dissipating inside the case. This is why I believe a fan is more useful (IMO).
The card stays cool enough with a heatsink that a fan isn't needed (it's also another thing that will die). MSI is a great brand and a top tier company. The drivers you can download straight from Nvidia and get the latest. You don't need to use theirs. I believe the card also comes with a 3yr. warranty.
 

Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
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Hi!

The 700 series is what you might call 'UEFI Aware/Compatible', but not UEFI Exclusive. I've used 700 series cards on extremely old boards (circa 2005/2006) without issue, because they work on legacy BIOS without issue.

The 710 is an ok option for a passively cooled no-fan card due to its combination of very tiny die size, low power requirements, and newer process technology.

The GT 220 used 65nm process tech. This means each 'wire' (not really a wire, but each pathway on the circuit of the actual die) was 65nm in width. The wider the circuit, generally the more power required to operate, and the more heat generated.

The GT 710 used 28nm process tech. Now the 710 is clocked a bit higher, and has a higher transistor count, but in total it's a cooler running card.

You will be ok with any 200 through 700 series option you can find, as long as it doesn't require 6/8 pin PCIe power, or is too long to physically fit. I've used your exact HP case dozens, perhaps 100+ times in repair/upgrade, or even new mATX builds using spare parts from non HP units ('mutt' PCs, which I put together from donated/recycled materials for a local food bank/charity/resale outfit).
 

Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
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I do have to note one more time an additional piece of info that may help you.

Your motherboard actually has integrated Intel HD video on it. If you look at the rear where the USB connections are, you will see one VGA port (blue), and one DVI port (white). With the Nvidia 220 video card plugged in, these ports are inactive. They may even have little plastic covers over them. However, if you remove the 220 graphics card, they will become the primary video output, and will become active.

If you have Windows 8 or 10, the drivers will automatically install.

If you have 7, you may need to download the drivers from the Intel website.

It's not as fast as a 710 or 750ti, but it's free, and completely competent at running Windows desktop apps. 1080p YouTube, etc.

If your monitor is connected via DVI or VGA, it's absolutely worth a try, as it's no cost/takes literally a few minutes to check out and finish setting up. And if you decide to go back to a dedicated graphics card, you simply move the video cable back to the card.
 
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synoptic12

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Hi!

The 700 series is what you might call 'UEFI Aware/Compatible', but not UEFI Exclusive. I've used 700 series cards on extremely old boards (circa 2005/2006) without issue, because they work on legacy BIOS without issue.

The 710 is an ok option for a passively cooled no-fan card due to its combination of very tiny die size, low power requirements, and newer process technology.

The GT 220 used 65nm process tech. This means each 'wire' (not really a wire, but each pathway on the circuit of the actual die) was 65nm in width. The wider the circuit, generally the more power required to operate, and the more heat generated.

The GT 710 used 28nm process tech. Now the 710 is clocked a bit higher, and has a higher transistor count, but in total it's a cooler running card.

You will be ok with any 200 through 700 series option you can find, as long as it doesn't require 6/8 pin PCIe power, or is too long to physically fit. I've used your exact HP case dozens, perhaps 100+ times in repair/upgrade, or even new mATX builds using spare parts from non HP units ('mutt' PCs, which I put together from donated/recycled materials for a local food bank/charity/resale outfit).
* Very much appreciated, whereby I can fully comprehend your synopsis. I point of contention; what connector will suffice or be compatible for my unit? You make mention of: "it doesn't require 6/8 pin PCIe power, or is too long to physically fit". Could you expand upon the specifics, as I'm so,mewhat at a loss to understand?

I believe I may try the Nvidia EVGA 710 contingent upon your analysis. The only thing is the memory bus width is 8X and not 16X. Would this be of any significance? I'm seeking plug and play with no issues, especially with connectivity. You are absolutely correct, 100% in providing the technical specs. I've sort of forgotten some, but you're right on point, no question. The 710 I'm looking at is not passively cooled (Heat Sink), rather employing a fan which I prefer.

* Your work in assisting food banks is truly a trait of good, whereby many, the great many have forgotten the lowly. Surely, your rewards are far greater than you can see.
 

synoptic12

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I do have to note one more time an additional piece of info that may help you.

Your motherboard actually has integrated Intel HD video on it. If you look at the rear where the USB connections are, you will see one VGA port (blue), and one DVI port (white). With the Nvidia 220 video card plugged in, these ports are inactive. They may even have little plastic covers over them. However, if you remove the 220 graphics card, they will become the primary video output, and will become active.

If you have Windows 8 or 10, the drivers will automatically install.

If you have 7, you may need to download the drivers from the Intel website.

It's not as fast as a 710 or 750ti, but it's free, and completely competent at running Windows desktop apps. 1080p YouTube, etc.

If your monitor is connected via DVI or VGA, it's absolutely worth a try, as it's no cost/takes literally a few minutes to check out and finish setting up. And if you decide to go back to a dedicated graphics card, you simply move the video cable back to the card.
* Thanks much for the information which I was unaware. However, I would like to install a video card. My monitor I believe employs DVI, VGA, and possibly HDMI. At least I'm running the monitor on HDMI. HP Monitor- w2338h; just too lazy to look up the specs or even check the connections.
 

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