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U2410 too hot. Looking for replacement with same quality.

Fishy007

Member
Sep 11, 2006
144
0
0
Hi Everyone,
I own a Dell U2410 and it's a great looking monitor, but it runs WAY too hot. It heats up my home office to the point where I need to shut everything down for a few hours in the afternoons just to cool the office down.

I'm looking to replace the monitor with an LED backlit monitor with IPS panels. The Dell U2412 seems to be a theoretical fit, but I'm not 100% sure about the quality or heat coming from it. Anyone have any experience with this?

I'm also open to other suggestions. I've tried an Asus VE series monitor and did not like the quality. I can live with 1920x1080, but would prefer 1920x1200. LED backlit is essential as this will keep down the heat.

Thanks for any input/help!
 

Phynaz

Lifer
Mar 13, 2006
10,140
817
126
I'd be surprised if the roughly 30 watt difference in power consumed is going to make a difference in how hot your office gets.
 

RaistlinZ

Diamond Member
Oct 15, 2001
7,629
10
91
I have a hard time believing the 2410 make so much heat that you have shut down the office for hours. Do you have no air circulation in your office?
 

Fishy007

Member
Sep 11, 2006
144
0
0
I have a hard time believing the 2410 make so much heat that you have shut down the office for hours. Do you have no air circulation in your office?
I'm *choosing* to shut it down for a few hours and work off of my laptop instead. Thank you for your comment.
 

Fenuxx

Senior member
Dec 3, 2004
907
0
76
A monitor just doesn't get that hot unless it's malfunctioning. They get warm, yes (as in, you can feel warmth putting your hand on the top-back of the monitor) but they don't get so hot as to cause a significant, or even noticeable, issue with ambient temperature.

If the monitor is very hot to the touch, then it's likely malfunctioning, in which case, either warranty it if you can, or get a new one. If it's merely warm to the touch, then your heat issue is elsewhere.
 

arkcom

Golden Member
Mar 25, 2003
1,814
0
76
A monitor just doesn't get that hot unless it's malfunctioning. They get warm, yes (as in, you can feel warmth putting your hand on the top-back of the monitor) but they don't get so hot as to cause a significant, or even noticeable, issue with ambient temperature.

If the monitor is very hot to the touch, then it's likely malfunctioning, in which case, either warranty it if you can, or get a new one. If it's merely warm to the touch, then your heat issue is elsewhere.
My old westinghouse lvm-37w3 at 210w did. That combined with an OCed computer can raise my room 10+ degrees over the rest of my house.
 

toyota

Lifer
Apr 15, 2001
12,957
1
0
that monitor does use 75 watts for normal operation which does seem like a lot. even my old Dell is listed as 31 watts normal and the top of it is certainly warm and I can feel a little heat coming out. I cant imagine 75 watts would heat up a room too bad but it certainly would not help if its a small room with little circulation.
 

palladium

Senior member
Dec 24, 2007
537
1
81
Apple Cinema Display (you'd need a mDP capable card or adaptor) comes to my mind immediately. Or, if you can afford it (I'm assuming you use it for colour critical stuff for your work since you want IPS) the HP Dreamcolour 24" (RGB LED). Or, you can just turn down the brightness to reduce power consumption and heat output.
 

DigitalWolf

Member
Feb 3, 2001
108
0
0
Well the 2410 is listed at 75W for normal operation. While the 2412 is listed at about half of that for normal and 72W max.


If the 2412 really is in the mid 30 wattage range most of the time it would definitely be "cooler". I don't have any personal experience with it. If you buy it and it ends up being more typical 72W than mid 30's it would be a waste of money.


I know my U2711 is listed at 113W for typical use. I don't have to shut it down on warm days (live in the US-South East). However, I often feel like I'm getting a radiation based sun tan when I work in front of it for hours. *.*


I guess if you use some form of cool lighting in your office it would be easier to notice. Since relatively you are sitting in front of a 75W light bulb (try taking one out barehanded after a few hours... obviously they do get a bit warm).
 

ShintaiDK

Lifer
Apr 22, 2012
20,378
131
106
Buy a fan and open the window instead. Also your OC puts out more heat most likely. And 30W saving on a new screen wont do much.

Then there is the lightning of the room. You can maybe save 30-50W there too.
 

Fishy007

Member
Sep 11, 2006
144
0
0
Do a Google search for 'u2410 heat' and you'll find enough threads to show that the heat problem is somewhat common. Using an infrared thermometer, I measured the logo at the back of the monitor around 50c and the screen around 35c.

Despite the recommendations on how to ventilate my office, I'm still looking for any alternative that will provide similar quality. It doesn't have to be a U2412.
 

BD231

Lifer
Feb 26, 2001
10,568
136
106
I've had a 2410, ran hot as a crotch and couldn't do anything over 60 hz. Got an Acer GD235hz which puts out almost NO heat after hours of operation and it's twice as fast.
 

Ajay

Diamond Member
Jan 8, 2001
9,482
3,946
136
Speaking of power consumption... will Dell be replacing the 2410 with an LED model anytime soon?
 

stuartl89

Member
Feb 4, 2012
27
0
0
I share an office at work and both of us have 2 u2410's(4 total). They run hot. We have 4 other dell monitors (2 2007fp's and 2 2208wfp's) in the same office and none of them run anywhere near as hot.

-S
 

bleucharm28

Senior member
Sep 27, 2008
494
1
76
I have the 2408WFP, beautiful picture and the sucker is damn HOT!!! I had been looking around for led as well. Not serious enough to buy one yet. But i did purchase ($230.00 after discount) an Air condition for my PC room. That will keep me and my pc cool. :)
 

ViRGE

Elite Member, Moderator Emeritus
Oct 9, 1999
31,516
165
106
My best advice would be to keep in mind that heat generation and temperature are not the same thing. The U2410 may get hot, but that's because it doesn't dissipate heat particularly well. The fact of the matter is that regardless of how hot it gets, it can't generate more heat than the amount of power it consumes. And for a powerful desktop system, 75W is low if not trivial.

In any case your options basically boil down to getting a lesser monitor. All monitors of similar quality have similar levels of power consumption (it's the combination of IPS + CCFL backlighting). As you've correctly noted, something like the U2412M would be your best bet since it's only a minor reduction in image quality (IPS -> eIPS). Even then you're only reducing heat by 30W or so, which isn't going to make a huge difference.

Thanks, I know :) But I'm one of those picky people who notice things like image quality (want 8 bit IPS, not *-IPS). I miss everything about my Sony G400, except it's size. I will have to put up with a bit of blue bleed through (most likely) with LED, but otherwise I prefer it.
To the best of my knowledge, no one has wide gamut LED backlighting right now, so it's simply not physically possible to have a LED backlit U2410.
 

Yuriman

Diamond Member
Jun 25, 2004
5,530
141
106
ViRGE is absolutely right. You can easily reduce the total heat output in your office by more than what the monitor produces by simply lowering your overclock, undervolting, or both.

Your video cards each have a TDP of 160w, so between the two of them (under load) they can put out more than 4x as much heat as your monitor. Also, I seem to remember hearing something about SLI/crossfire preventing cards from going into low power states?

Regardless, having two high-end video cards idling is adding at least 40w, continuously.
 
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KingFatty

Diamond Member
Dec 29, 2010
3,034
1
81
Could the heat issue be exacerbated by the "feeling" of heat so close to the person? Maybe just a tiny little fan to blow a little bit of air past the monitor to gently move the heat away from the user could make a world of difference in how hot the office feels?
 

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