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Turkish Parliment Approves Troops for Iraq

Czar

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
28,510
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two things worth noting though
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3158686.stm
Turkey and the US have agreed on an action-plan to eradicate the Kurdish paramilitary group, the PKK.
The group is thought to have around 5,000 members living in northern Iraq.

Ever since the US occupied Iraq, Turkey has been pressing Washington to crack down on the group which both countries designate as terrorist.

Details of the plan are not clear, but a US official said any military action would be carried out by US troops.

Any large scale Turkish military presence in northern Iraq would be opposed by the Kurdish groups which currently run the area.
and

http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/6E20858D-2D68-4AB6-B01E-86E9F2E1E3AC.htm
Kurds oppose any form of Turkish military deployment in Iraq, according to an official from the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan.


Barham Salih made clear that foreign military forces in occupied Iraq could not guarantee security for the population and that a Turkish presence would only deteriorate an already bad situation.

His comments were published on Tuesday in Iraq?s al-Sabah newspaper.

"Turkish troops will face difficulties if they enter Iraq, because the majority of Iraqi groups do not want any military participation from any neighbouring country," he said.
 

BaliBabyDoc

Lifer
Jan 20, 2001
10,737
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My understanding was the Turkish troops would be deployed in Sunni areas only and definitely nowhere near the Kurdish north.
 

tnitsuj

Diamond Member
May 22, 2003
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Originally posted by: BaliBabyDoc
My understanding was the Turkish troops would be deployed in Sunni areas only and definitely nowhere near the Kurdish north.
So how are they going to get there and be resupplied? I doubt they are going to fly everything in when they could just drive, which would mean opening a supply corridor through the Kurdish regions. The Kurds will not like that at all.
 

heartsurgeon

Diamond Member
Aug 18, 2001
4,260
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if you read the turkish newspaper articles they state the turks will have a say in the location of deployment, and that the troops wioll be under turkish control.

this is one of those situations where it may be dangerous to "assume" anything.

i suppose the turks need the money, however, i doubt that politically, they are going to
put up with a lot of casualities unless they think their actions are in their own best interests...

they certainly want to resume oil transportation through turkey (revenues), perhaps they will be involved in guarding pipelines...who jnows the real details/facts
time will tell.
 

dahunan

Lifer
Jan 10, 2002
18,191
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Their history in Iraq is almost as BAD AS SADDAM'S... they need to stay the Fvck Out of there... Does the world really need Genocidal Turks?
 

CaptnKirk

Lifer
Jul 25, 2002
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There are some in the region that may view the entering of Turkey into the area
akin to a restoration of the Ottoman Empire of Yore. The Blood Feuds of time
continue in that region of the world since biblical times.

Extending out from that part of the Cradle of Civilization ( And they're called civilized ?)
you find countries like Bosnia in the Balkans that are still fighting a war from like 829 A.D.

The Northern Iraqis want their own country - the fabled Kurdistan, which would encroach on Turkey,
which with it's Kurdish population would upset the balance of territorial control between both countries,
which would again increase pressure on the Iranian population which again has a large Kurdish population.
To the west is Syria, same story, different page, next chapter. Ripe for revolution.

Israel running around the region beating it's chest and saying they're the biggest bully on the block isn't helpful.
 

KGB1

Platinum Member
Dec 29, 2001
2,998
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:| NOOOOOOOOOOOOEEEEEEEESSSS!!!!

Freagin Politicians in Parliamant. WTH are the Kurdish PKK gonna do when the see Turkish troops in the region "helping" them, the same troops they were shooting at before the war began. Fvck man.. Turkey has no clue what they are doing.

Idiots.. whatever payoff they are receiving will not enlighten the citizens. I'm expecting some heads to roll in turkish executive branch next election.
 

minibush1

Member
Sep 14, 2003
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U.S. Says It Can Persuade Iraqis to Accept Turks
By Jonathan Wright
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Bush administration said on Tuesday it was confident it could bring reluctant Iraqi leaders around to the idea of accepting Turkish troops under a proposal approved by the Turkish parliament.

The Iraqi Governing Council of 24 leaders chosen by the United States is wary of Turkish troops because of historic sensitivities, especially among the Kurds in the north, and worries that the Turks might come with ulterior motives.

But the United States needs all the security assistance it can obtain in Iraq and sees Turkish troops as ideal partners because of Turkey's secular Muslim tradition.

The White House and State Department said the United States welcomed the Turkish parliamentary vote on Tuesday which gave the government authority to deploy the troops.

In Colorado, where he spoke with reporters ahead of a two-day meeting of NATO defense ministers, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld welcomed the Turkish offer.

"It is appreciated," he said. "You have Iraqis all across the spectrum -- some who will be very happy, some who will be worried, some who will be neutral. Some won't have an opinion."

"Now, we will simply have to work with the Iraqis. And the (U.S. military's) Central Command will begin the task of seeing how and in what ways that might happen if, in fact, it's going to happen."

"Turkish troops would contribute to stability in Iraq and we will be consulting closely with the Turkish government over the details of Turkish participation," said State Department spokesman Richard Boucher.

AWARE OF IRAQI RESERVATIONS

The spokesman said the United States was aware of the reservations of Iraqi leaders but noted that the Iraqi Governing Council had not made a statement on the subject.

"We believe these things can be worked out (and) should be worked out because Turkish troops can make a contribution to stability. We will be working on all the details ... to make sure that the Iraqis agree with us on that," he added.

But the spokesman declined to say whether the Governing Council had a veto over the Turkish deployment. "The coalition (U.S. occupation authority) is very much in charge of the security situation," a senior U.S. official added.

"Our view would still be that they (the Iraqi leaders) should keep an open mind and try to work this out," said the State Department official, who asked not to be named.

The Governing Council has no military force under its command and does not even control Iraqi government finances, which remain under U.S. administrator Paul Bremer.

Earlier on Tuesday, representatives of Iraqi parties said the council members had all agreed to reject Turkish troops but a council member said later there was no joint decision.

The Kurds, mindful of the long conflict between the Turkish government and their fellow Kurds in southeastern Turkey, are the most vociferous opponents of the deployment.

Analysts say the Shiite of southern Iraq may also have reservations about Sunni Turkish troops, partly because of several centuries of imperial rule under the Ottoman Turks.

Even Sunni Muslims from central and western Iraq are wary of troops from any neighboring country.

But the United States, with nearly 140,000 troops in the country, is anxious for all the support it can obtain.

"If some large number of troops are available from a country that's interested in seeing a stable Iraq and that contributes to the security situation and relieves the stress on other forces ..." that's a good thing," Rumsfeld said.
 

CaptnKirk

Lifer
Jul 25, 2002
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Well I guess that it could be used as a statistic on a bar graph to present in the Bush directed
'White House Involvement' where Condaleeza Rice gets to present Daily Metrics in a Bord of Directors
environment so that the Leadership can be breifed hourly on the data that they expect to see,

Dosen't have to be current and factual - just a bullet on an itinerary with a pie chart
graph showing that said milestone has been met - just like a Corporation.

Only trouble with that is this is a Country with an indigenous population and not a statistic to be thrown
around like management decisions at the last minute. Governorship by management decree dosen't work.
McNamera tried it under out onred our old friend LBJ back in the 60's and we tried to manage both the
Military and the Siagon Regieme by political meddling.
35 years later - no lesson was learned.
 

Hayabusa Rider

Admin Emeritus & Elite Member
Jan 26, 2000
50,880
4,212
126
I wonder how the Iraqis are going to be "persuaded" to accept Turks.

Face it, slave-states like Iraq are going to do exactly what the master country demands. If the US decides it will happen then it will. If not, it is because the US decides it to be so. Be interesting to see how this plays out.
 

heartsurgeon

Diamond Member
Aug 18, 2001
4,260
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Does the world really need Genocidal Turks?
well lets see..
genocidal americans (native american indians, africans)
genocidal germans (the jews, the poles, the catholics)
genocidal english (the scots, the irish)
genocidal russians (themselves)
genocidal canadians (native indians)
genocidal indian's (native moslim community)
genocidal japanese (the chinese)
genocidal israelis (the palestinians)
genocidal palestinians (the israelis)
genocidal iraqi's (the kurds)
genocidal chinese (nepalise, themselves)
genocidal serbs......
genocidal africans...
genocidal australians...

you get my drift...

you apparently are bigotted against the only moslem democracy in the area.
the ottoman empire welcomed jews from europe when they were being killed and driven out of spain by christians (inquistion).
turkey's history in iraq as bad as saddam's ???? how do you come up with this stuff?

the ottoman empire absorbed many cultures and ethnicities, and when it's time passed, the British, French and Russians did their best to incite
certain ethnic minorities within the ottoman state to violently break away in an effort to further weaken and split up the empire. lots of people on both sides of these conflicts died, or were forceably relocated (including ethnic turks).

you need to read more history, and have your facts straight before you start making sweeping generalities...


 

minibush1

Member
Sep 14, 2003
119
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Iraq Kurds warn of violence if Turkey sends troops
By Seb Walker

MOSUL, Iraq, Oct. 8 ? Iraqi Kurds who had helped U.S. forces topple Saddam Hussein are threatening to turn their guns against their old enemy Turkey if Ankara sends troops to Iraq at Washington's request.
Turkey's efforts to suppress a Kurdish separatist movement within its own borders have inflamed the antagonism of Iraqi Kurds towards their neighbour.

''I don't want Turkish troops coming to Iraq,'' Kurdish taxi driver Saddam Younis, 27, said in Mosul. ''They will be attacked when they pass through the north.''
Facing daily guerrilla attacks and mounting financial costs, Washington is trying to get more countries to commit troops and funds to help stabilise Iraq. Turkey's parliament voted on Tuesday to send soldiers to join the occupation force in Iraq.
Turkish troops are not expected to be based in Kurdish areas. But they will probably have to enter Iraq through Kurdish territory and may need to maintain supply bases in the north.
''We don't want them in the north, south, middle, east or west,'' said Mahdi Herky, spokesman for the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) in Mosul. ''We don't want them to come.''
The KDP and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan ran areas of northern Iraq that broke away from Saddam's rule after the 1991 Gulf War and became autonomous zones under U.S. protection.
Both parties are on the U.S.-appointed Governing Council.
Growing Kurdish influence in the north has angered other groups, particularly the Turkmen -- Turkish speakers who are a vestige of Ottoman rule. Clashes between Kurds and Turkmen in August killed at least 10 people, sparking outraged headlines in Turkish newspapers and ratcheting tension even higher.
Most Turkmen have welcomed the prospect of Turkish troops.
''Turkey wants to help the Iraqi people preserve security and stability and rebuild Iraq,'' said Songul Chapouk, the Turkmen representative on the Governing Council. ''God willing, the Turkish troops, who are Muslim troops, will be welcomed by the Iraqi people,'' she told Reuters on Monday.
Members of the Governing Council said on Tuesday the body had agreed to reject the presence of troops from any of Iraq's neighbours. The Council's president then said no final decision had been made, causing further confusion.
But as the Governing Council and the U.S.-led administration try to resolve their dispute, most Kurds insist that the arrival of Turkish troops would spark ethnic bloodshed.
''What they're after is control in the north,'' said Jasim Mahmoud, 34-year-old Kurd working at a Mosul Internet shop. ''Kurdish parties are preparing their weapons and if the Turks come down through the north I'm sure they will be attacked.''
 

heartsurgeon

Diamond Member
Aug 18, 2001
4,260
0
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well heck, they're already shooting at the U.S. troops, why do you think they're not going to shoot at the
turkish (french, german, russian) troops.

doesn't it make you uneasy that the article quotes a
guy in his 20's named Saddam. gosh, i wonder who his parents named him after?
 

tnitsuj

Diamond Member
May 22, 2003
5,446
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Originally posted by: heartsurgeon
well heck, they're already shooting at the U.S. troops, why do you think they're not going to shoot at the
turkish (french, german, russian) troops.

doesn't it make you uneasy that the article quotes a
guy in his 20's named Saddam. gosh, i wonder who his parents named him after?
Saddam isn't an uncommon name in Iraq.
 

Hayabusa Rider

Admin Emeritus & Elite Member
Jan 26, 2000
50,880
4,212
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My son has a toy Guinea pig that came with the name George. I suppose I should fear it.

Silly people.
 

tnitsuj

Diamond Member
May 22, 2003
5,446
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Originally posted by: WinstonSmith
My son has a toy Guinea pig that came with the name George. I suppose I should fear it.

Silly people.
Well we all know how well informed Americans are about other cultures and peoples. :disgust:

I blame the liberal public school system.
 

Oric

Senior member
Oct 11, 1999
836
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US Administration left out no options for Turkey. We were to approve the decision or go bust ...
 

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