Trump supporter says the silent part out loud: Trump should be hurting people Trump supporters hate, not them

Nov 20, 1999
22,873
39
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#1
https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/1/8/18173678/trump-shutdown-voter-florida

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/07/us/florida-government-shutdown-marianna.html

“I voted for him, and he’s the one who’s doing this,” she said of Mr. Trump. “I thought he was going to do good things. He’s not hurting the people he needs to be hurting.”
Republicans are patient 0 of our dysfunctional politics. Outside of guns, your average republican doesn't have any rigid policies besides 'owning the libs'. Remember when Trump went to South Carolina during the primaries and declared what a big mistake the Iraq war was and shit all over the Bush family when they attended the debate? These idiots all of a sudden started grumbling about how right he was when the left has been saying it was a mistake for years while they were sucking bush's dick.

Republicans are sociopaths without any real policy goals except doing the opposite of what Democrats want to do. That is why this country is fucked.

Dumbass republican government workers, farmers, coal workers, rural folks etc. fucked themselves for voting for this buffoon.
 
Nov 4, 1999
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#2
You see the same theme from those "conservatives" that still post here -
They're just not honest about it.
 
Oct 6, 2009
22,027
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#3
You see the same theme from those "conservatives" that still post here -
They're just not honest about it.
Yep, gotta exterminate the progreshiveks or whatever they are called.
 
Feb 4, 2009
18,859
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#5
https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/1/8/18173678/trump-shutdown-voter-florida

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/07/us/florida-government-shutdown-marianna.html



Republicans are patient 0 of our dysfunctional politics. Outside of guns, your average republican doesn't have any rigid policies besides 'owning the libs'. Remember when Trump went to South Carolina during the primaries and declared what a big mistake the Iraq war was and shit all over the Bush family when they attended the debate? These idiots all of a sudden started grumbling about how right he was when the left has been saying it was a mistake for years while they were sucking bush's dick.

Republicans are sociopaths without any real policy goals except doing the opposite of what Democrats want to do. That is why this country is fucked.

Dumbass republican government workers, farmers, coal workers, rural folks etc. fucked themselves for voting for this buffoon.
Sounds like someone is tired of winning
 

greatnoob

Senior member
Jan 6, 2014
944
54
136
#6
Do you all remember how we were told (unsurprisingly from other Trumpanzees and a small portion of ‘bleeding heart’ libs here) that Trumpanzees were suffering from “economic anxiety,” that they were just misunderstood, upstanding Christians and that Trump was going to be a great guy if we gave him enough time? Laughable.

I don’t want to seem like I’m gloating, but I’ll repeat what I said years ago: his policies don’t stand up to even the least bit of scrutiny, his base is mostly made up of unhinged, uneducated xenophobes and bigots (whilst the rest are 1%ers purely driven to vote for him for their own interests) and you cannot possibly have a rationale for voting for Trump over Hilary unless you are naive and fall to being easily duped by snake oil salesmen.

I’m still waiting to be proven wrong now that those talking points have faded into obscurity.
 
Jul 17, 2003
13,294
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#7
In 96-97 I had some pound cake from Marianna, been there many times. To call it a conservative area is an understatement, least then it was. If people there are questioning their support of Trump, then I say awesome news.

Nice to see people waking up, even if it's been taking way too long. Some people need pain to spur learning. Pity that.
 

Indus

Diamond Member
May 11, 2002
4,412
149
126
#8
Proof positive they want Hitler/ Himmler/ Goebbels and they got Trump/ Ivanka/ Jared.

Just divide the fucking country already.

If we had already done it, me and my wife would not be victims of assault by Trumpers.
 
Nov 20, 1999
22,873
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#9
If you really think about it, Republicans do an excellent job of killing their own base off.
 

twjr

Senior member
Jul 5, 2006
405
7
91
#10
The last part of her statement is really telling. Clearly doesn't care what Trump does so long as he makes the "others" suffer.
 
Oct 10, 1999
64,859
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#11
The last part of her statement is really telling. Clearly doesn't care what Trump does so long as he makes the "others" suffer.
Psychopathic is what I would call it. Not a Shrink though.
 

twjr

Senior member
Jul 5, 2006
405
7
91
#13
Psychopathic is what I would call it. Not a Shrink though.
Not sure I'd go that far. I do think it exemplifies the adversarial and entrenched tribalism that is rife in society. Be it sports teams, religion or political party everything is reduced to "us v them". However, the Republicans have perfected the fear of the other in their intellectually insecure base.
 

Viper1j

Golden Member
Jul 31, 2018
1,196
259
96
#14
“I voted for him, and he’s the one who’s doing this,” she said of Mr. Trump. “I thought he was going to do good things. He’s not hurting the people he needs to be hurting.”
I LOVE the taste of karma in the morning! 1547030335197.gif
 

interchange

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 1999
5,232
84
126
#15
I heard a reference to this cartoon on the radio this morning. We need to do away with this mentality. First step is acknowledging it.

 

pmv

Diamond Member
May 30, 2008
3,474
93
126
#16
Do you all remember how we were told (unsurprisingly from other Trumpanzees and a small portion of ‘bleeding heart’ libs here) that Trumpanzees were suffering from “economic anxiety,” that they were just misunderstood, upstanding Christians and that Trump was going to be a great guy if we gave him enough time? Laughable.

I don’t want to seem like I’m gloating, but I’ll repeat what I said years ago: his policies don’t stand up to even the least bit of scrutiny, his base is mostly made up of unhinged, uneducated xenophobes and bigots (whilst the rest are 1%ers purely driven to vote for him for their own interests) and you cannot possibly have a rationale for voting for Trump over Hilary unless you are naive and fall to being easily duped by snake oil salesmen.

I’m still waiting to be proven wrong now that those talking points have faded into obscurity.
I'm not sure it should be about the moral failings of individuals so much as what motivates entire classes and demographic groups to lean certain ways. Particular, existing individual members of those groups might be deeply entrenched and beyond salvation, but I don't see that it's useless to ask why people from certain groups end up with those views and whether there's any way that could change. With respect to those 1%ers it probably can't, because they know what their interests are, but I can't accept it's true about the rest of them because that would be just too depressing.
Also, those who didn't vote at all are as significant as those who voted for Trump over Hillary.

(Obviously Trump was always going to be a terrible President)
 
Jun 4, 2004
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#17
I heard a reference to this cartoon on the radio this morning. We need to do away with this mentality. First step is acknowledging it.

Obligatory


Yup lady it sure sucks to be hit by a hurricane and then lose your paycheck but owning the libs and making the 0.01% richer takes sacrifices - specifically yours.
 

twjr

Senior member
Jul 5, 2006
405
7
91
#18
I heard a reference to this cartoon on the radio this morning. We need to do away with this mentality. First step is acknowledging it.

That pretty well sums it up. Some people can't comprehend that everyone can be winners. There's always got to be a loser.
 

greatnoob

Senior member
Jan 6, 2014
944
54
136
#19
I'm not sure it should be about the moral failings of individuals so much as what motivates entire classes and demographic groups to lean certain ways.
I'd like to add my personal anecdote for this interesting point you've raised:

As a former religious die-hard I can attest that my conservative views - back when I was a teenager - were (mostly) drilled into my head at a young age (i.e., I went to a religious school and had parents, family and friends who were also very religious and conservative). The remaining 20% of 'my' views were moulded from trying to reinforce my warped version of reality with more of the same BS I was taught as a kid. Whether it was from YouTube videos about conspiracies against religion or 'day of reckoning' posts from a few whackjobs I had on Facebook, it was a clear cut case of selection bias and no sign of critical thinking on my part.

I was unemployed, scoring well above average in most of my classes and was very sociable at school then. In retrospect, I would say that I didn't come off as a weirdo because I never really exposed any of my whackjob views to anybody but my closest friends. I considered myself a moral and just person because I followed "the word of God" so anytime I judged a 'sinner,' I would pride myself for being above them in some arbitrary, nonsensical religious way. This holier-than-thou mentality I had, I feel, was due to my religious and conservative upbringing which I believe are intertwined very closely together. Add onto that the fact I was a brainwashed teenager who was completely lost on even the idea of basic critical thinking (i.e., "don't believe conspiracy theories from random morons on the internet") and you can hopefully understand how interdependent the link between "religion" and conservatism really is. Religion and conservatism both fuel each other in ways I can't fully describe but at least as a starter, consider that:

1. religion specifically forces one to throw all reasoning out of the window, whilst...
2. conservatism and conservative ideas banks on the dumb and gullible to preserve themselves post-enlightenment era into the age of information

I am in my twenties, have graduated from uni and am now working in a relatively good paying corporate job. I'm extremely lucky to have broken out of the dogmatic thinking brought on by my religious and conservative upbringing because had I not, I believe I would not have gone to uni, would be in a low-skill low-paying job and would be stuck in a cycle of hate, self-loathing and sloth, exacerbating the religion-conservatism link I mentioned above.


Particular, existing individual members of those groups might be deeply entrenched and beyond salvation, but I don't see that it's useless to ask why people from certain groups end up with those views and whether there's any way that could change. With respect to those 1%ers it probably can't, because they know what their interests are, but I can't accept it's true about the rest of them because that would be just too depressing.
Also, those who didn't vote at all are as significant as those who voted for Trump over Hillary.

(Obviously Trump was always going to be a terrible President)
Agree. What I don't understand is how middle-aged individuals have gone through their entire lives not questioning their beliefs. I personally know how hard it is to question one's beliefs (it took me a good 2 years before I was fully convinced about what I came to realise about religion being man made) but to go through some 20-40+ years without reevaluating even a single iota of your views... that is just mind boggling. Needless to say, old age is certainly a negative factor when it comes to the malleability of one's world view.
 

interchange

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 1999
5,232
84
126
#20
I'd like to add my personal anecdote for this interesting point you've raised:

As a former religious die-hard I can attest that my conservative views - back when I was a teenager - were (mostly) drilled into my head at a young age (i.e., I went to a religious school and had parents, family and friends who were also very religious and conservative). The remaining 20% of 'my' views were moulded from trying to reinforce my warped version of reality with more of the same BS I was taught as a kid. Whether it was from YouTube videos about conspiracies against religion or 'day of reckoning' posts from a few whackjobs I had on Facebook, it was a clear cut case of selection bias and no sign of critical thinking on my part.

I was unemployed, scoring well above average in most of my classes and was very sociable at school then. In retrospect, I would say that I didn't come off as a weirdo because I never really exposed any of my whackjob views to anybody but my closest friends. I considered myself a moral and just person because I followed "the word of God" so anytime I judged a 'sinner,' I would pride myself for being above them in some arbitrary, nonsensical religious way. This holier-than-thou mentality I had, I feel, was due to my religious and conservative upbringing which I believe are intertwined very closely together. Add onto that the fact I was a brainwashed teenager who was completely lost on even the idea of basic critical thinking (i.e., "don't believe conspiracy theories from random morons on the internet") and you can hopefully understand how interdependent the link between "religion" and conservatism really is. Religion and conservatism both fuel each other in ways I can't fully describe but at least as a starter, consider that:

1. religion specifically forces one to throw all reasoning out of the window, whilst...
2. conservatism and conservative ideas banks on the dumb and gullible to preserve themselves post-enlightenment era into the age of information

I am in my twenties, have graduated from uni and am now working in a relatively good paying corporate job. I'm extremely lucky to have broken out of the dogmatic thinking brought on by my religious and conservative upbringing because had I not, I believe I would not have gone to uni, would be in a low-skill low-paying job and would be stuck in a cycle of hate, self-loathing and sloth, exacerbating the religion-conservatism link I mentioned above.




Agree. What I don't understand is how middle-aged individuals have gone through their entire lives not questioning their beliefs. I personally know how hard it is to question one's beliefs (it took me a good 2 years before I was fully convinced about what I came to realise about religion being man made) but to go through some 20-40+ years without reevaluating even a single iota of your views... that is just mind boggling. Needless to say, old age is certainly a negative factor when it comes to the malleability of one's world view.
I think if you reach to aid your thinking through suppression of another point of view (by various mechanisms), it is axiomatic that you have gone wrong somewhere.
 
Jun 17, 2005
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#21
Just divide the fucking country already.

If we had already done it, me and my wife would not be victims of assault by Trumpers.
I'm sorry, but that would not work. That will lead to a war with this conservative country within a year.

They would simply set up their conservative utopia by giving everything to the rich and removing all safety, ecological, economical, and labor protections. Then when in a year the entire economy has collapsed and people are starving they would do the only other thing they believe in, taking it by force from those that have it.

This is inherent in their thinking, when they accuse Democrats of wanting to just give everything away for free by taking it from those that have it at gun point it is because that is the only other solution they can see, so when their policies fail that is what they will revert to. So, when their own policies fail and they are desperate it will never even occur to them to try something different, or ask for help, the only solution they will see is killing the people that have what they want and taking it.
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
63,299
212
126
#22
I think if you reach to aid your thinking through suppression of another point of view (by various mechanisms), it is axiomatic that you have gone wrong somewhere.
I know that you have just expressed this in relation to another's post, but I at least seem to not be very good at figuring out how the specifics are intended. Could you perhaps make up some example out of thin air of this that would perhaps provide a second example?
 
Jun 17, 2005
10,842
125
126
#23
What I don't understand is how middle-aged individuals have gone through their entire lives not questioning their beliefs. I personally know how hard it is to question one's beliefs (it took me a good 2 years before I was fully convinced about what I came to realise about religion being man made) but to go through some 20-40+ years without reevaluating even a single iota of your views... that is just mind boggling. Needless to say, old age is certainly a negative factor when it comes to the malleability of one's world view.
The solution to this is simple. Really stop and consider how dumb the average person is, then remember that half of them are dumber than that.

It really comes down to that. Most people are not well educated, and society pretty strongly discourages examining those beliefs, so even those capable of it are likely to not have the education to do so, or stand to lose their entire social if they do, so few people ever actually do.

Personally, I think a lot more people really do come to the same conclusions as you just intentionally decide not to act on it because they see that their life is much simpler if they just go along with the charade. If you really examine Christian culture you can see that a large number of Christians don't really believe the things they claim, as can be exemplified by the fact that they never seem to follow through on any of it. A true belief can be seen through a person's actions, not their words.
 
Jun 23, 2004
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#25
Do you all remember how we were told (unsurprisingly from other Trumpanzees and a small portion of ‘bleeding heart’ libs here) that Trumpanzees were suffering from “economic anxiety,” that they were just misunderstood, upstanding Christians and that Trump was going to be a great guy if we gave him enough time? Laughable.
Because one guy quoted in the OP equals everyone in a group?
Step away from the Nazis, you're starting to think like them.

And yes, it's the economy stupid!
People wouldn't elect a man promising trade wars if they felt safe and secure. Scapegoats are borne for a reason, for the underlying issue of economic insecurity. So they fidget and they rage and they voted for a man that promised them everything. They were desperate for a con man, and they got one. Yes, there are various reasons, but the underlying victory was due to economic stress.
 

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