Trump says he doesn't care about predicted US national debt explosion because ‘I won't be here’

Nov 20, 1999
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#1
Oct 6, 2009
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#2
That's comforting to hear the experts are predicting a hockey stick spike in debt in the not too distant future.
 

Hayabusa Rider

Admin Emeritus & Elite Member
Jan 26, 2000
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#3
I think they care less than that. They don't care if the problem is ever fixed as long as they are able to blame someone else. Trump is the gold standard for this thinking. As has been said "FYGM".
 
Aug 21, 2003
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#4
Conservative concern about debt starts where Democrats want to use it to help the American people (healthcare, infrastructure, education, etc) and ends at tax cuts/wars. It's not the concept of massive debt they are opposed to...it's the potential that it could actually be used to improve the lives of US citizens.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
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#5
It will be two parts amusing and two parts infuriating to see the conservative debt panic immediately resume in January, 2021.
 

tweaker2

Diamond Member
Aug 5, 2000
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#6
The Repubs are already chomping at the bit to reclaim the title of being fiscal conservatives after handing the wealthy those nice fat tax cuts so they can go right back to hammering away at social services and entitlements, pushing hard to either get rid of them or privatizing them for fun and profit.

Being two-faced doesn't even begin to describe their shameless hypocrisy.
 

Mike64

Platinum Member
Apr 22, 2011
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#7
It will be two parts amusing and two parts infuriating to see the conservative debt panic immediately resume in January, 2021.
Where's the "heavy, depressive sigh" emoticon when you need it...?:(

PS: At this point I can't muster even that level of implicit optimism...<another vbs>
 
Jun 2, 2000
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#8
On the positive side I'm taking this as a strong signal that Trump doesn't plan on being around more than twelve more months. The debt explosion has been cycling up since at least mid-summer.
 
Feb 4, 2009
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#9
I heard about this on the radio.
Someone needs to bump this thread twice a year for the next decade.
Don’t ask me I’m not the guy to do it
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
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#10
The Repubs are already chomping at the bit to reclaim the title of being fiscal conservatives after handing the wealthy those nice fat tax cuts so they can go right back to hammering away at social services and entitlements, pushing hard to either get rid of them or privatizing them for fun and profit.

Being two-faced doesn't even begin to describe their shameless hypocrisy.
Well they have a fundamental problem in that voters like higher taxes on the rich and more spending on services. Republicans on the other hand want lower taxes on the rich and less spending on services.

That only leaves them with two choices. They can either

1) do what the voters want or
2) lie about it

They went with option 2.
 
Aug 21, 2003
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#11
It will be two parts amusing and two parts infuriating to see the conservative debt panic immediately resume in January, 2021.
When this is attempted it should be met with nothing less than boiling contempt from Democrats.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
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#13
When this is attempted it should be met with nothing less than boiling contempt from Democrats.
Sure, at which point they will respond with a mixture of ‘I never supported the increased deficits!’ (New guys), ‘we lost our way but we mean it this time’ (old guys) and ‘what we really have isn’t a revenue problem, it’s a spending problem’ (everyone).

We can start to get really mad when the media pretends to believe them yet again as well.
 
Jul 1, 2001
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#14
I can appreciate the honesty... I don't think that any sitting president has cared about the national debt since Clinton (and he really just got lucky and hit a economic boom period during his term), but none of them have publicly admitted that.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
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#15
I can appreciate the honesty... I don't think that any sitting president has cared about the national debt since Clinton (and he really just got lucky and hit a economic boom period during his term), but none of them have publicly admitted that.
Clinton also raised taxes at the start of his first term over deficit fears. After him (besides Trump) we only have Bush and Obama. It’s obvious Bush didn’t care about deficits but who knows about Obama? I mean under Obama increasing the deficit was the best thing he could have done for the nation’s long term debt health as fiscal multipliers for much of his time in office were above 1, meaning every deficit dollar spent made more than $1 of GDP, so deficits were actually making our debt more manageable. After all, if you had to go in debt $100 this year to increase your income yearly by $120 forever that’s a pretty fiscally responsible investment.
 

interchange

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 1999
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#16
I think this is more of a Trump thing than a Republican thing, although nearly all politicians have made compromises on this front. It seems that Trump, however, compromises only with public perception and not public interest.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
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#17
I think this is more of a Trump thing than a Republican thing, although nearly all politicians have made compromises on this front. It seems that Trump, however, compromises only with public perception and not public interest.
Considering every Republican for the last four decades has blown up the deficit with the enthusiastic support of republicans in Congress at what point do we consider it a Republican thing? I mean Cheney is famously quoted as saying he considered deficits irrelevant.

Actually the one notable exception to this that proves the rule is George HW Bush, who lost re-election in significant part due to conservative rage at him for attempting to address the deficit.
 

Indus

Diamond Member
May 11, 2002
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#18
Let them eat cake, much?
 

tweaker2

Diamond Member
Aug 5, 2000
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#19
Well they have a fundamental problem in that voters like higher taxes on the rich and more spending on services. Republicans on the other hand want lower taxes on the rich and less spending on services.

That only leaves them with two choices. They can either

1) do what the voters want or
2) lie about it

They went with option 2.

They will always go for option 2 even if it's just for the "feels". It's been spliced into their DNA. As we all know, it's all the GOP leadership have to offer their commoner class voters because all of the bounty they glean from them gets directly handed over to the very wealthy who own their party's very soul.

The GOP aristocracy and their vassals have the choice of either lying their asses off to their working class constituency to keep their seats or be honest and lose elections by the dozens.
 

Commodus

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 2004
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#20
This would make great fodder for Democrat election ads. Just remind voters that Trump doesn't care what his policies will do to the country once he's out of office. Thankfully, there's a good chance he'll be out of office sooner than he thinks he will...
 
Nov 29, 2006
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#21
It's refreshing to hear a repub actual utter the words anyone with a a brain cell would already know this has been GOP policy for years. Small government, low taxes, reduce spending are just lip service their sheep keep falling for.
 

cytg111

Diamond Member
Mar 17, 2008
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#22

interchange

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 1999
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#23
Considering every Republican for the last four decades has blown up the deficit with the enthusiastic support of republicans in Congress at what point do we consider it a Republican thing? I mean Cheney is famously quoted as saying he considered deficits irrelevant.

Actually the one notable exception to this that proves the rule is George HW Bush, who lost re-election in significant part due to conservative rage at him for attempting to address the deficit.
I think they've made different compromises and may have different ideas about the risk to the country in growing the deficit. I think the expression of "I won't be here" without any concern for the nation other than his immediate image is uniquely Trump. But I don't know for sure. It'd be really depressing to think every politician or every Republican is simply Trump with a thicker veneer.
 
Oct 6, 2009
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#24
I think they've made different compromises and may have different ideas about the risk to the country in growing the deficit. I think the expression of "I won't be here" without any concern for the nation other than his immediate image is uniquely Trump. But I don't know for sure. It'd be really depressing to think every politician or every Republican is simply Trump with a thicker veneer.
I think you mean every Republican politician is simply Trump but smart enough not to admit it in public.
 
Nov 11, 1999
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#25
I think they've made different compromises and may have different ideas about the risk to the country in growing the deficit. I think the expression of "I won't be here" without any concern for the nation other than his immediate image is uniquely Trump. But I don't know for sure. It'd be really depressing to think every politician or every Republican is simply Trump with a thicker veneer.
What's the best time to be astoundingly Rich? When everybody else is broke, busted & begging. That's when you can really put the bone to 'em. Ask Mnuchin.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY