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tRump commutes the pending sentence of The Dirty Trickster

Grey_Beard

Golden Member
Sep 23, 2014
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Seems that the Commander in Crook just commuted his buddy Roger Stone’s sentence. Pardons and commutations used to mean a reprieve for some who may have been innocent or was given a term too harsh for the crime. Yes, it was used by Presidents as they walked out the door, but this is ridiculous. It took time to convince the people around a President to think about it and then to act. Now, all you need is a relationship with a corrupt man, be corrupt and viola, free. Just think of Stone’s lineage, first Nixon, who we thought was the most corrupt President. Now its tRump, as it seems Roger has stepped up his game.


Edit: Fixed the title to more accurately reflect the act. And removed the reference to pardon to commutation.
 
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pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
17,788
1,873
126
Seems that the Commander in Crook just pardoned his buddy Roger Stone. Pardons used to mean a reprieve for some who may have been innocent or was given a term too harsh for the crime. Yes, it was used by Presidents as they walked out the door, but this is ridiculous. It took time to convince the people around a President to think about it and then to act. Now, all you need is a relationship with a corrupt man, be corrupt and viola, free. Just think of Stone’s lineage, first Nixon, who we thought was the most corrupt President. Now it tRump, as it seems Roger has stepped up his game.

Commuted sentence is not equal to a pardon. Just for clarity.
 
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fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
71,109
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This is the most nakedly corrupt act in the history of the United States. Bar none.

Everyone, liberal, conservative, whatever, needs to commit to removing this criminal from office this November.
 

VRAMdemon

Diamond Member
Aug 16, 2012
4,921
4,378
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Presidents should not be able to pardon or commute sentences when the case involves the sitting president. It’s a mafia boss’ wet dream.

As for the reason he commuted the sentence instead of outright pardoning him?

Best guess: Stone wants to have a record as a guy who did it and got away with it.

He wanted to be free to fight his conviction in court in order to clear his name. I have no idea if that is true or not, but it is one interpretation.

IIRC Stone could still face New York state prosecution. If so, hopefully they’ll get on that...
 

HomerJS

Lifer
Feb 6, 2002
25,658
10,718
136
Presidents should not be able to pardon or commute sentences when the case involves the sitting president. It’s a mafia boss’ wet dream.

As for the reason he commuted the sentence instead of outright pardoning him?

Best guess: Stone wants to have a record as a guy who did it and got away with it.

He wanted to be free to fight his conviction in court in order to clear his name. I have no idea if that is true or not, but it is one interpretation.

IIRC Stone could still face New York state prosecution. If so, hopefully they’ll get on that...
Founders had a debate about that very thing.

On the afternoon of Wednesday, June 18, 1788, George Mason rose from his chair on the floor of the Virginia Ratifying Convention deeply troubled by what he thought of the convention’s failure to understand—the president of the United States might not always be someone of sound character and high intelligence. There would rarely, if ever, he reminded the delegates, be a commander in chief with the courage and rectitude displayed by George Washington during the War of Independence. There might even be a president who would try to change our form of government. The president, argued Mason,

"ought not to have the power of pardoning, because he may frequently pardon crimes which were advised by himself. It may happen, at some future day, that he will establish a monarchy, and destroy the republic. If he has the power of granting pardons before indictment, or conviction, may he not stop inquiry and prevent detection? The case of treason ought, at least, to be excepted. This is a weighty objection with me.”
Madison understood immediately the force of Mason’s objection, but he had a response—a response in which he described limitations on presidential power that, to our great misfortune, have for too long been forgotten. Was there a danger in giving the president the power to pardon? “Yes,” replied Madison, but there was a remedy for the danger in the Constitution as drafted.

“There is one security in this case to which gentlemen may not have adverted: if the President be connected, in any suspicious manner, with any person, and there be grounds to believe he will shelter him, the House of Representatives can impeach him; they can remove him if found guilty.”
Madison really fucked that one up. Or was he unable to envision a President and a party so corrupt??
 

UNCjigga

Lifer
Dec 12, 2000
22,799
5,142
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Well let's see if the DOJ members have the balls to mutiny like Barr said they would. My money is on "no fucking way, Democrats would be worse."
Mark my words—there will be stories in the press over the next few days that Barr and others close to Trump threatened to resign if Trump pardoned Stone. Pay these stories no heed, for there won’t be any resignations amongst Trump’s sycophants. It will be fluff to help them feel better.

I’m sure Susan Collins is concerned... and yet will still confirm Trump’s picks to replace US Attorneys in DC, SDNY or EDNY if Barr runs out of acting replacements.
 

VRAMdemon

Diamond Member
Aug 16, 2012
4,921
4,378
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I say potato, you say patato.
Trump acted now because Stone was scheduled to report to prison next week. Trump commuted Stone’s sentence instead of pardoning him to minimize the political impact to his own re-election chances. After the election, all bets are off. I have absolutely no doubt that he will pardon Stone before he leaves office.

Accepting a pardon is an admission of guilt. And as a result prevents you from invoking the 5th amendment on the grounds of self-incrimination. I’m guessing this is a way to keep Stone from being subpoenaed in the future to testify against Trump - without a pardon he can still invoke the 5th. The reason that Trump is doing this is because Stone is his long-time associate and much more importantly because Stone has dirt on Trump.”
 
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dank69

Lifer
Oct 6, 2009
26,205
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Well let's see if the DOJ members have the balls to mutiny like Barr said they would. My money is on "no fucking way, Democrats would be worse."
Oh my gosh would you look at all the mutiny.
 

Thump553

Lifer
Jun 2, 2000
11,808
1,125
126
According to this, commutation sounds better than a pardon. "yea I did it, but I'm not going to sit in prison anyways"

Stone told Trump he didn't want a pardon because that would involve an admission of guilt.
 

Grey_Beard

Golden Member
Sep 23, 2014
1,584
1,636
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Stone told Trump he didn't want a pardon because that would involve an admission of guilt.
Imagine that now he will be on the stump for tRump. I am sure we will all be sick of him with his cocky attitude that he got away with it again. Hopefully the next AG will have the balls to do go after these guys and give them their just deserts.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
71,109
20,766
136
Oh my gosh would you look at all the mutiny.
Meh, if they did mutiny you wouldn’t know it yet. The way to tell is if we get a ton of leaks of embarrassing shit over the next weeks and months.

I’m not saying they actually will do this, but I don’t think we can tell either way at this time.
 

hal2kilo

Lifer
Feb 24, 2009
16,397
4,331
136
Even Newmax has a story quoting Mulvaney as saying the testing is not enough and fubared. One rat standing on the gun rail.

 

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