Question TRENDnet 5-Port 10G Switch, 5 x 10G RJ-45 Ports, 100Gbps Switching Capacity, Supports 2.5G and 5G-Base-T Connections, TEG-S750 @ Amazon

VirtualLarry

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Aug 25, 2001
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TRENDnet 5-Port 10G Switch, 5 x 10G RJ-45 Ports, 100Gbps Switching Capacity, Supports 2.5G and 5G-Base-T Connections, Lifetime Protection, Black, TEG-S750


$309.99

First TP-Link intro'ed their 5-port consumer unmanaged 10GbE/multi-gig switch, now it's TRENDnet's turn.

Looks largely the same, guessing probably same chipset.

Curious to see a teardown comparison between the two, especially considering heatsink size/placement.
 
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Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
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Cool. Still $309 does seem a bit much for an unmanaged 5 port switch, even if 10GbE. I guess it depends on how many ports are needed on a switch, and if they all need to be 10GbE or would a bunch of GbE and some 2.5GbE do as well. For instance, the Zyxel switch I got (managed) has 8 GbE ports, 2 2.5GbE ports, and 2 SFP+ 10Gb ports. The switch + the 2 transceivers came to about $220 or so.
 

VirtualLarry

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Well, Amazon seems to be perenially sold-out of the QNAP 2x 10GbE + 4x 2.5GbE, but I was able to get one last week or the week before from B&H for $169.99 + tax.

And the TP-Link 5-port 10GbE/multi-gig switch, is on sale @ Amazon for $282 right now. I personally think that they shouldn't cost more than $50/port. You can get 8-port for $400 right now, so the 5-port is actually way overpriced for what it is.
 

aigomorla

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4 x 10G ports on those of us on UBNT platform, for 299.

I think that is probably the best under 300 dollar switch you can get, however it does require unifi to manage.
 
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Fallen Kell

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Just a FYI that you can get some very decent 10G switches on the used/refurb markets for about $100 less which have 10x the features and performance. My personal favorites are the Brocade ICX series (there is a huge tread on serve the home forums):

I personally have a ICX 6610 (just the 24 port version). Picked it up for ~$200. It is a complete managed L3/L4 switch, with 8 SFP+ 10G ports, 2 QSFP+->4xSFP+ 10G breakout ports, 2 QSFP+ 40G ports, and either 24 or 48 10/100/1000 RJ45 ports. But recognize, this is an enterprise class switch (it does have a web management capability, but most of the really complex stuff is typically done via command line (very similar command line interface to CISCO, so if you have used/configured CISCO switches, it won't take you much to figure these out). Also recognize that along with enterprise grade, they have enterprise level noise (well at least the 6610, there are others in that thread which are completely quiet).

Just saying that you should look into these before you spend $300 on an unmanaged layer 2 switch, when you can get fully managed L3/L4 switches for $100 less with more capability. Just do some research on that thread first (over 6500 posts and counting in it with tips, hints, configuration help, questions and answers, etc, but all the important info on the various switches themseleves are right in the top of the post with current updated info, including a whole how-to guide on initial connecting, wiping/factory reset, and patching to latest firmware/OS).
 
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Justinus

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That's why I avoid that kind of stuff, and would much prefer to go with "consumer" fanless switches.
There are actually a lot of reasons why this kind of hardware may be unsuitable.
  • It's huge
  • It's loud
  • It uses a lot of power
  • They only have 1/10G SFP+ ports, with no multigig support
  • You have to buy expensive transceivers in order to use RJ45 10GbE
I just picked up the Unifi Switch Flex XG and it's great, except when I try to run iperf on it, it can't handle the load and only generates 20KB/s throughput. Seems weird to me they would include iperf installed on the switch if the CPU can't meaningfully run it.
 

Fallen Kell

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That is why I prefer enterprise stuff over consumer and prosumer gear. The enterprise stuff will actually run at full speed. No worry about only getting 20KB throughput on gear that runs purely in hardware at full linespeed. Sure you need to do some research to make sure you are getting the right thing for you. Also, not all enterprise gear is loud and power hungry. My switch is about 80W. That really isn't that power hungry. Some of the others I recommend are passive with no active fan needed (mine is not, but mine also supports 40gbps, not just 10gbps). And most of the brocades I recommend have no problem with "multigig" support for tranceivers that do 10/100/1000/2500/5000/10000 maps.

But you do need to do the math on costs. Prices are finally starting to come done for 10gbps home switches. For the enterprise stuff I use, you need to assume another ~$45 per 10gbps port for a tranceiver for every port you need to connect via CAT6/CAT7. But if you are in the same room as the switch, sticking with SFP+ on the client side and using a twinax cable is the way to go (you probably save $60-80 on the network card for the PC and the twins cables are only a few bucks more than a CAT6a cable when under 15 feet or so length).
 
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Justinus

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That is why I prefer enterprise stuff over consumer and prosumer gear. The enterprise stuff will actually run at full speed. No worry about only getting 20KB throughput on gear that runs purely in hardware at full linespeed.
It only generates 20Kb/s in iperf because I'm SSHing into the switch and the switch is running the program on its CPU. If I iperf across the switch from two clients it runs at full speed. My gripe is why does the switch already have iperf installed on it if the CPU can't handle it.

I wouldn't be surprised if enterprise switches also didn't have fast enough CPU's to run iperf at 10Gbit/s, since most switches use specialized switching hardware.
 
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Fallen Kell

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Oct 9, 1999
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Yeah, that is just bad design in that case. My only guess is that someone in marketing/research saw that people who benchmark networks use iperf and told someone else who then told the engineers to figure out how to install it on the switch so they could claim they had iperf...
 

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