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Tom's H. noise charts - reliable?

DigDog

Lifer
Jun 3, 2011
12,164
1,321
126
what the header says;

i'v seen at times Tom's Hardware noise and heat charts differ wildly from other websites, and i have been wondering for some time how reliable they are. Tom's had a period of bad vibes when it was putting out some dodgy reviews, now i'm curious if the noise charts went the same way. What's weird is that nowhere near the charts is mentioned that the dB scale is logarithmic ...
 

exar333

Diamond Member
Feb 7, 2004
8,518
8
91
I think it really depends on the case used and their methodology. Short answer is really the reliability is article by article, and you should look closely at what they used and how they measured their results to judge if the conclusions are indeed valid.
 

Jaydip

Diamond Member
Mar 29, 2010
3,691
21
81
what the header says;

i'v seen at times Tom's Hardware noise and heat charts differ wildly from other websites, and i have been wondering for some time how reliable they are. Tom's had a period of bad vibes when it was putting out some dodgy reviews, now i'm curious if the noise charts went the same way. What's weird is that nowhere near the charts is mentioned that the dB scale is logarithmic ...
Why they need to mention that?Its pretty well known
 

Ben90

Platinum Member
Jun 14, 2009
2,866
2
0
I converted to the linear values for 680 vs 680 SLI for you so you can better judge the noise difference.
 

magomago

Lifer
Sep 28, 2002
10,973
14
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Why they need to mention that?Its pretty well known
actually i would bet money that most people reading benchmarks don't really think about what the scales truly mean.

and in the case of audio being measured in deciBels, I'd bet you that even more have *no* idea how to interpret it.

I've never seen the charts, but this is what I'd think they would have to control and maintain for their results to really be valid:

1) measure using the same case
2) measure using the same system configuration
3) measure using the same mic
4) measure from the same distance
5) measure with ambient conditions as consistently quiet as possible
 

Ben90

Platinum Member
Jun 14, 2009
2,866
2
0
To be completely honest, SPL doesn't tell the entire story. Technically speaking, a person could hear a 150dB sound their entire life and it wouldn't matter if it was at like 0.01Hz. However a 150dB sound at 50000000000000Hz would pretty much ruin your ears instantly.

Deep sea divers already subject themselves to noises over the theoretical limit for undistorted sound in air.
 

DigDog

Lifer
Jun 3, 2011
12,164
1,321
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sorry i didn't want to go into technical as i can get nerdy on audio, it's just that if you rate a 37dBa card "quiet" then a 43dBa card can't be "reasonably quiet" ... it's twice the f* noise! a spectrum analysis would be even better but hey, they could just write the spl @ 300hz and that would also be ok.

thing is, i'v got a (see sig) and it's really, really annoying, i can hear it wooshing away even when i'm playing shooty-bomby things and my next card *has* to be proper quiet.
 

BrightCandle

Diamond Member
Mar 15, 2007
4,762
0
76
I would say Toms noise charts are indicative. All the sound testing is only really valid on one site however as they use different setups that produce wildly different results. Its also hard to say what the floor of their test setup is unless they publish it (and as far as I know Toms never has).

I really wish they would publish some frequency data as well or have more sites record the noise.
 

Leyawiin

Diamond Member
Nov 11, 2008
3,204
51
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Techpowerup's reviews tend to have pretty good subjective and objective noise measures of cards. W1zzard is really fussy about noisy cards.
 

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