Time For New CPU?

May 2, 2014
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#1
i5-2400 runs 63C in bios, low90sC in Prime 95. Happens with 2 different mobo and 3 different coolers (Stock, Zalman CNPS10X, Dynatron K687) all seated properly in atx case with 2 Scythe Slipstream pwm 120mm case fans intake and exhaust. I cleaned each cooler and the cpu each time I made a hardware change and reapplied Arctic Silver Ceramique 2.

It has worsened over it's lifetime. Most of it's life the idle temp was in the upper 30sC. Room temp usually 20C.
 

Yuriman

Diamond Member
Jun 25, 2004
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#3
Bios is not idle. What does it run at in Windows? 90c in Prime95 is also not concerning. Why would you replace it? Is it crashing?
 
May 2, 2014
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#4
Bios is not idle. What does it run at in Windows? 90c in Prime95 is also not concerning. Why would you replace it? Is it crashing?
60c at idle in Windows.
I am trying to figure out if I should replace it. Or just buy a new mobo which I need.
 
Apr 22, 2012
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#5
Idle temperature doesn't matter. If it only peaks at 90C. Keep it.

Only reason to change it would be because you want something new, like Skylake.

Have you tried a clean Windows install?
 
May 2, 2014
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#6
Idle temperature doesn't matter. If it only peaks at 90C. Keep it.

Only reason to change it would be because you want something new, like Skylake.

Have you tried a clean Windows install?
I have done a clean install.
As for something new I can not afford an i5. Maybe an i3. Or I change to AMD.
 

phexac

Senior member
Jul 19, 2007
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#7
I have done a clean install.
As for something new I can not afford an i5. Maybe an i3. Or I change to AMD.
I would avoid replacing an i5 with an i3.
 

mysticjbyrd

Golden Member
Oct 6, 2015
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#11
I would rather just replace the mobo.
60 C is very high for idle temp, so a 30 C increase during insane load makes sense.

I doubt the MB is causing the CPU to run 20-30 C too hot. As long as the thing runs I wouldn't worry about replacing anything atm. If money is an issue, which you said it was, then I suggest to just sit tight for a year. AMD and Intel will be introducing a new socket, mobo, and new die shrunk CPUs.

My advice would be to not run prime 95, or OC the CPU, and just let it live a nice happy cool life until retirement. If additional issues begin to arise later, underclock the cpu.
 
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May 2, 2014
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#12
60 C is very high for idle temp, so a 30 C increase during insane load makes sense.

I doubt the MB is causing the CPU to run 20-30 C too hot. As long as the thing runs I wouldn't worry about replacing anything atm. If money is an issue, which you said it was, then I suggest to just sit tight for a year. AMD and Intel will be introducing a new socket, mobo, and new die shrunk CPUs.

My advice would be to not run prime 95, or OC the CPU, and just let it live a nice happy cool life until retirement. If additional issues begin to arise later, underclock the cpu.
I must have done a better job applying the thermal paste earlier today. My current core idle temp is 50c.

I still need a new mobo though. Current one has usb and ethernet port issues. I think the best thing to do is buy a new mobo and keep my i5-2400.
 

Yuriman

Diamond Member
Jun 25, 2004
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#13
I must have done a better job applying the thermal paste earlier today. My current core idle temp is 50c.

I still need a new mobo though. Current one has usb and ethernet port issues. I think the best thing to do is buy a new mobo and keep my i5-2400.
I agree. An i3 or anything from AMD will be a sidegrade at best.
 

frogspawn

Junior Member
Nov 6, 2015
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#14
Yeah i have heard something about Arctic silver...... something about being a astroturfing company or something like that.

Best thing is any paste that is too much of a liquid such as AS5 and others will need to be re-applied after 10-12 months as the liquid dries out and creates free-space holes. Hence performance loss.

Best idea is to choose a paste that has a high viscosity in order to avoid re-application every ten months.
 
May 2, 2014
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#15
Yeah i have heard something about Arctic silver...... something about being a astroturfing company or something like that.

Best thing is any paste that is too much of a liquid such as AS5 and others will need to be re-applied after 10-12 months as the liquid dries out and creates free-space holes. Hence performance loss.

Best idea is to choose a paste that has a high viscosity in order to avoid re-application every ten months.
I will remember.
Thanks.
 
Aug 25, 2001
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#16
Yeah i have heard something about Arctic silver...... something about being a astroturfing company or something like that.

Best thing is any paste that is too much of a liquid such as AS5 and others will need to be re-applied after 10-12 months as the liquid dries out and creates free-space holes. Hence performance loss.

Best idea is to choose a paste that has a high viscosity in order to avoid re-application every ten months.
I've taken apart rigs after several years, that have had AS5 applied, and they honestly didn't seem to need re-pasting. (Ok, technically, after breaking the bond and observing, they did, but if I didn't do that, I don't think that they needed it.)

It's no-where near as bad as the "olden days" with plain white silicon paste, that became rock-hard after a few years, and the ceramic PGA pentium chips needed to be separated from their heatsink / fan assembly with a screwdriver. (Those CPGA chips were pretty tough suckers.)
 

Charlie98

Diamond Member
Nov 6, 2011
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#17
You still haven't told us what mobo this is on. If it's possible, reduce the vCore. I had some serious heat issues with my 2500K (OC'd or not; ) my solution was to reduce the vCore. I was still able to get a reasonable OC and reduce idle and load temperatures.
 


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