Thor Love and Thunder

Paratus

Lifer
Jun 4, 2004
15,522
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Trailer was released today.

Taika Waititi is back as director. The Guardians are in it along with Jeff Goldblum. I loved what Waitit did with Thor Ragnarok so I’m looking forward to see him direct this cast.

The poster looks like He-Man and the trailer has Guns and Roses. Definitely hitting my 80’s childhood.
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
46,557
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"Just look into the eyes of the one you love" rofl

Waititi did an OUTSTANDING job on the third installment, looking forward to this one!
 

Aikouka

Lifer
Nov 27, 2001
30,193
756
126
One thing that's interesting is that the teaser doesn't really do much to detail the antagonist of the movie (i.e. Gorr the God Butcher). Apart from the last bit of the teaser, which showed Natalie Portman's Jane Foster as The Mighty Thor, most of it is fairly innocuous and isn't going to spoil everything like some movie trailers do.
 

JM Aggie08

Diamond Member
Jan 3, 2006
7,839
525
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As mentioned, Waititi was at the helm for what has been hands down the best Thor movie. Cannot. FUCKING. Wait.

Also, if you like Waititi's work and acting, Our Flag Means Death is excellent.
 

Homerboy

Lifer
Mar 1, 2000
30,294
4,257
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As mentioned, Waititi was at the helm for what has been hands down the best Thor movie. Cannot. FUCKING. Wait.

Also, if you like Waititi's work and acting, Our Flag Means Death is excellent.
It's more than that, it's phenomenal. Not just in the comedy etc. but for how fresh and progressive it is.
 

MrSquished

Lifer
Jan 14, 2013
14,703
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It's more than that, it's phenomenal. Not just in the comedy etc. but for how fresh and progressive it is.
I loved What We Do In the Shadows, thought it was the funniest movie I've seen in ages, I recommend it to everybody. I bought it so I can see it every year. The show was pretty good as well. Jojo Rabbit, excellent tip top stuff. The Thor movie, great.

But the pirate show? It has funny moments but man does it try too hard, it gets annoying, and it's just not that good to me. I'm still trying to get through it a month later.
 
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pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
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Actual comic-book superhero fans are no longer the "target" audience for Marvel movies thanks to Disney.... now they're geared more towards little kids.

:confused:

I don't know if "actual comic-book superhero fans" were ever the target audience. Is that really a large enough group to aim at? Personally I never had any interest in comic book superheros (I did quite like 2000AD as a kid, but never had any interest in the American stuff - DC and Marvel and all that repetitive super-hero spandex stuff, seemed very boring to me) but was surprised to find myself finding the Marvel movies quite entertaining. It seems to work as movies in a way it doesn't as comic books. And Waititi was responsible for some of the better stuff (I still chuckle at the memory of Thor's "I know this guy, he's a friend from work" line)
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
23,624
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I don't know if "actual comic-book superhero fans" were ever the target audience. Is that really a large enough group to aim at? Personally I never had any interest in comic book superheros (I did quite like 2000AD as a kid, but never had any interest in the American stuff - DC and Marvel and all that repetitive super-hero spandex stuff, seemed very boring to me) but was surprised to find myself finding the Marvel movies quite entertaining.
The "fans" I'm referring to were kids reading comics in the late 1960's/early-mid 1970s' in particular.... we're getting on in years!

;)

I had mail-order subscriptions to the comics Avengers, Hulk, X-Men and my favorite was always Spider Man. (no Iron man though!)

The first round of Marvel movies was absolutely made to appeal to fans who cut their teeth on the "paper" comics AND were targeted somewhat more toward adults with their more sophisticated stories/dialogue. (ie: the first Captain America)

NOW get off my lawn! :p :)
 

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
10,433
5,144
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The "fans" I'm referring to were kids reading comics in the late 1960's/early-mid 1970s' in particular.... we're getting on in years!

;)

I had mail-order subscriptions to the comics Avengers, Hulk, X-Men and my favorite was always Spider Man. (no Iron man though!)

The first round of Marvel movies was absolutely made to appeal to fans who cut their teeth on the "paper" comics AND were targeted somewhat more toward adults with their more sophisticated stories/dialogue.

NOW get off my lawn! :p :)

I remember an older family member having those US comics - as a child or even teen they just looked really boring to me. Too American and unrelated to the real world, and the same thing over-and-over again. I do remember, though, when 2000AD started and kids at school had the first issue. It was kind of "punk" in relation to Marvel and DC's hipplies, and had a similar generation gap appeal. Though I suppose "Action" comic got there even earlier.

Interesting that a lot of the people who started with 2000AD went on to "update" Marvel's own approach. Alan Moore being one famous 2000AD alumni.
 
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pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
10,433
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Very tangentially related - learned recently that Thor was called Thunar in Anglo-Saxon mythology. Now it's a Linux file manager.
 
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Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
23,624
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I remember an older family member having those US comics - as a child or even teen they just looked really boring to me. Too American and unrelated to the real world, and the same thing over-and-over again. I do remember, though, when 2000AD started and kids at school had the first issue. It was kind of "punk" in relation to Marvel and DC's hipplies, and had a similar generation gap appeal. Though I suppose "Action" comic got there even earlier.

Interesting that a lot of the people who started with 2000AD went on to "update" Marvel's own approach. Alan Moore being one famous 2000AD alumni.
Actually they were fairly well-written compared to what you see in the comics that are still sold on paper today.... kids back then were forced to learn to read even in the US!

And we're talking about Superhero comics that were created IN America.

What exactly were you expecting? Realism ?? :)
 

Meghan54

Lifer
Oct 18, 2009
10,720
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I remember an older family member having those US comics - as a child or even teen they just looked really boring to me. Too American and unrelated to the real world, and the same thing over-and-over again. I do remember, though, when 2000AD started and kids at school had the first issue. It was kind of "punk" in relation to Marvel and DC's hipplies, and had a similar generation gap appeal. Though I suppose "Action" comic got there even earlier.

Interesting that a lot of the people who started with 2000AD went on to "update" Marvel's own approach. Alan Moore being one famous 2000AD alumni.
Actually, you are quite incorrect about those old comics not reflecting the real world. They certainly did, but you’d actually have to have read them, something you’ve already admitted you didn’t.
 
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Lifer
May 30, 2008
10,433
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Actually they were fairly well-written compared to what you see in the comics that are still sold on paper today.... kids back then were forced to learn to read back then even in the US!

And we're talking about Superhero comics that were created IN America.

What exactly were you expecting? Realism ?? :)

Well, that's what was interesting about 2000AD. Much as punk did, it bought in recognisable aspects of the 'real world', along with politics, satire, and a bit of shock-value.
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
23,624
5,592
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Well, that's what was interesting about 2000AD. Much as punk did, it bought in recognisable aspects of the 'real world', along with politics, satire, and a bit of shock-value.

I hate to break it to you but I had to Google 2000AD ... no reflection on how good it is just that I've never heard of it.

And considering you have not actually read ANY of those older American comics yourself I'm with Megan54.... it's like criticizing food that you've never tasted.
 

nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
54,155
6,727
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Actually they were fairly well-written compared to what you see in the comics that are still sold on paper today.... kids back then were forced to learn to read even in the US!

And we're talking about Superhero comics that were created IN America.

What exactly were you expecting? Realism ?? :)
Modern comics are often much, much better than the 60s/70s comics IMO. I grew up reading comics in the 80s/early 90s, but my uncle had a large collection of 60s/70s stuff that I'd read during the summer.
Alan Moore is fantastic, regardless of the fact he's not American :p
 

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
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I hate to break it to you but I had to Google 2000AD ... no reflection on how good it is just that I've never heard of it.

And considering you have not actually read ANY of those older American comics yourself I'm with Megan54.... it's like criticizing food that you've never tasted.

Meh, I recall trying to read them and getting too bored to continue. Just couldn't see what was supposed to be interesting about them. Not my culture. Very analogous to pre-punk rock music.

2000AD went straight into political contentiousness (my parents did _not_ approve of it, which was part of the appeal).
 
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Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
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Modern comics are often much, much better than the 60s/70s comics IMO. I grew up reading comics in the 80s/early 90s, but my uncle had a large collection of 60s/70s stuff that I'd read during the summer.
Alan Moore is fantastic, regardless of the fact he's not American :p
I was a little kid back then cut me some slack! ;)
 
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