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This woman's dying wish is ruined...

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LegendKiller

Lifer
Mar 5, 2001
18,256
68
86
I am a graduate of FIU, got my MBA there. I know the President of the school, worked for him for 4 months. I really can't understand why they just don't give her the degree. She's probably going to die (hopefully not though), they should award her one. She won't dilute my, or anybody else's degree, nor will she actually be able to use it. Maybe I'll lob a call into the alumni association.
 

Gooberlx2

Lifer
May 4, 2001
15,381
5
91
Originally posted by: dmcowen674
Originally posted by: wasssup
Originally posted by: moshquerade
It would set a bad precedent if they just handed her a degree b/c of her circumstances.
True, but it would likely only be relevant in similar cases where the person is dying. Honestly I'm not sure what guidelines the college is bound by, but couldn't they just give her a special diploma or something? All she wants is a piece of paper, I don't think she'll be using the degree to get a job anywhere......
They did offer her a "piece of paper", an Associates degree in Arts.

Her and her mother turned it down.

Her and her mother did not say what major she was looking for a bachelor degree in most likely because she never picked a major and did not fulfill the requisets for one.

All the news clip did say was that she exceeded the amount of credits needed for a bachelor degree.

I asked who's fault is it that she didn't get into taking specific classes for a major?

Normally after you reach a certain number of credits (normally when you reach the Associate Arts level) that a Guidance Office of a College asks you to pick a major towards a bachlelor degree.

So who was at fault here???
Ummmm hers and her mother's. Guidance offices are their for your use. You are not required to use them. The school has no idea what your plans are, if they'll change or whether you just want to take classes and be a professional student. After highschool you're adult and the college isn't going to hold your hand. It was up to her to pick a degree, something which would have been clearly outlined as a requirement for a bachelor's in the information they received upon enrolling.
 

LegendKiller

Lifer
Mar 5, 2001
18,256
68
86
Originally posted by: Gooberlx2
Originally posted by: dmcowen674
Originally posted by: wasssup
Originally posted by: moshquerade
It would set a bad precedent if they just handed her a degree b/c of her circumstances.
True, but it would likely only be relevant in similar cases where the person is dying. Honestly I'm not sure what guidelines the college is bound by, but couldn't they just give her a special diploma or something? All she wants is a piece of paper, I don't think she'll be using the degree to get a job anywhere......
They did offer her a "piece of paper", an Associates degree in Arts.

Her and her mother turned it down.

Her and her mother did not say what major she was looking for a bachelor degree in most likely because she never picked a major and did not fulfill the requisets for one.

All the news clip did say was that she exceeded the amount of credits needed for a bachelor degree.

I asked who's fault is it that she didn't get into taking specific classes for a major?

Normally after you reach a certain number of credits (normally when you reach the Associate Arts level) that a Guidance Office of a College asks you to pick a major towards a bachlelor degree.

So who was at fault here???
Ummmm hers and her mother's. Guidance offices are their for your use. You are not required to use them. The school has no idea what your plans are, if they'll change or whether you just want to take classes and be a professional student. After highschool you're adult and the college isn't going to hold your hand. It was up to her to pick a degree, something which would have been clearly outlined as a requirement for a bachelor's in the information they received upon enrolling.
I have a feeling a lot of people really don't have any idea what it's like to go through cancer. I have had several people in my life die from it, my wife was afflicted at 26. The complete lack of empathy is disgusting.

I am a "by the book" guy, I have gone through 10 years of post-HS education, almost 3 of those at FIU spending a lot of time and money taking every finance class possible and working for the President, and have worked damn hard to get where I am.

However, I feel that she should get her degree, at least an honorary one.
 

Gooberlx2

Lifer
May 4, 2001
15,381
5
91
Originally posted by: LegendKiller
I have a feeling a lot of people really don't have any idea what it's like to go through cancer. I have had several people in my life die from it, my wife was afflicted at 26. The complete lack of empathy is disgusting.

I am a "by the book" guy, I have gone through 10 years of post-HS education, almost 3 of those at FIU spending a lot of time and money taking every finance class possible and working for the President, and have worked damn hard to get where I am.

However, I feel that she should get her degree, at least an honorary one.
I'm not saying there weren't distractions. Obviously any info they got, letters from the school, perhaps even phonecalls from the guidance office probably would have been shuffled to the "not important right now" pile. But Dave was really alluding to the school being at fault...which just isn't the case. Personally, I don't think anyone is at "fault", however if blame must be laid (as Dave insists), then it lies on their end.

...it's just a crappy situation all around.
 

dmcowen674

No Lifer
Oct 13, 1999
54,894
46
91
www.alienbabeltech.com
Originally posted by: LegendKiller
Originally posted by: Gooberlx2
Ummmm hers and her mother's. Guidance offices are their for your use. You are not required to use them. The school has no idea what your plans are, if they'll change or whether you just want to take classes and be a professional student. After highschool you're adult and the college isn't going to hold your hand.

It was up to her to pick a degree, something which would have been clearly outlined as a requirement for a bachelor's in the information they received upon enrolling.
I have a feeling a lot of people really don't have any idea what it's like to go through cancer. I have had several people in my life die from it, my wife was afflicted at 26. The complete lack of empathy is disgusting.

I am a "by the book" guy, I have gone through 10 years of post-HS education, almost 3 of those at FIU spending a lot of time and money taking every finance class possible and working for the President, and have worked damn hard to get where I am.

However, I feel that she should get her degree, at least an honorary one.
Wow, you are human :shocked: :thumbsup:

IMO they should be able to compromise.

They said she has more than the needed credits for a degree.

They could ask her what was her "desire" as far as subject material (not just getting a degree) and steer the "extra" credits she has in that field.

That should satisfy all "requirements".
 

SillyOReilly

Golden Member
Aug 11, 2007
1,535
6
81
A lot of you guys are hardasses.

You can't possibly be worried that she'll compete with your on a job.
 

dmcowen674

No Lifer
Oct 13, 1999
54,894
46
91
www.alienbabeltech.com
Originally posted by: SillyOReilly
A lot of you guys are hardasses.

You can't possibly be worried that she'll compete with your on a job.
Are you kidding?

Between illegal Mexicans at $3.00 hr and uncontrolled brain cancer patients, their jobs are toast.
 

miniMUNCH

Diamond Member
Nov 16, 2000
4,159
0
0
Originally posted by: daniel1113
Originally posted by: Allen Iverson
Originally posted by: nonameo
Honorary degree?
yep they should give her that. if bill gates can have one, she should.
Not really... even though I am against honorary altogether, they are generally only given to honor an individual's contribution to society.

Looking past the emotional bullshit, it's clear that this girl should not be getting a degree that she did not earn.
I agree... people die all the time with some desire/wish left unfulfilled. This woman is just a drop in the bucket. Sorry... I feel for her suffering, but that is how I see it.
 

91TTZ

Lifer
Jan 31, 2005
14,374
1
0
It's very sad that she's dying, but I don't see what that has to do with getting a degree that she didn't earn. A lot of people in here are blinded by emotion and can't see the logic. She didn't earn the degree she wanted and turned down the one that she did earn. Enough said.
 

LegendKiller

Lifer
Mar 5, 2001
18,256
68
86
Originally posted by: miniMUNCH
Originally posted by: daniel1113
Originally posted by: Allen Iverson
Originally posted by: nonameo
Honorary degree?
yep they should give her that. if bill gates can have one, she should.
Not really... even though I am against honorary altogether, they are generally only given to honor an individual's contribution to society.

Looking past the emotional bullshit, it's clear that this girl should not be getting a degree that she did not earn.
I agree... people die all the time with some desire/wish left unfulfilled. This woman is just a drop in the bucket. Sorry... I feel for her suffering, but that is how I see it.
Yeah, so we shouldn't try to help her feel a bit better at all.

Wow, you guys are really heartless people. One day, somebody close to you will probably have a long drawn out death and you might understand the complete desire to make them feel better.

My wife was out of work for 4 months dealing with her cancer. I was flying up to NYC almost every weekend to meet with her docs. Luckily I had a somewhat understanding boss, but only because his wife had breast cancer a few years before.

You never quite understand this stuff until you experience it. The more I think about this the more I am pissed off at FIU. I am definitely going to call/email people I know there.
 

91TTZ

Lifer
Jan 31, 2005
14,374
1
0
Originally posted by: LegendKiller

I have a feeling a lot of people really don't have any idea what it's like to go through cancer. I have had several people in my life die from it, my wife was afflicted at 26. The complete lack of empathy is disgusting.
I don't know what it's like to get killed by a rabid hamster, either, but I don't see what that has to do with someone receiving a degree that they did not earn. You are suggesting that they "just give it to her" because she's dying. This is illogical.

You get a degree when you earn it. Did she earn it? No.

The fact that she's dying, or has a kitten, or wears pink bunny slippers, or drives a Ford Taurus has no bearing on the fact that she did not meet the requirements to earn the degree.

I can understand an honorary one, but it sounds like the family is demanding a real one. Don't get me wrong- it's very sad that she's dying, but this has nothing to do with other unrelated issues.
 

LegendKiller

Lifer
Mar 5, 2001
18,256
68
86
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
Originally posted by: LegendKiller

I have a feeling a lot of people really don't have any idea what it's like to go through cancer. I have had several people in my life die from it, my wife was afflicted at 26. The complete lack of empathy is disgusting.
I don't know what it's like to get killed by a rabid hamster, either, but I don't see what that has to do with someone receiving a degree that they did not earn. You are suggesting that they "just give it to her" because she's dying. This is illogical.

You get a degree when you earn it. Did she earn it? No.

The fact that she's dying, or has a kitten, or wears pink bunny slippers, or drives a Ford Taurus has no bearing on the fact that she did not meet the requirements to earn the degree.

I can understand an honorary one, but it sounds like the family is demanding a real one. Don't get me wrong- it's very sad that she's dying, but this has nothing to do with other unrelated issues.
Not everything in the world is logical, some things should be done to ease people's passing, if it's not a huge problem. It's not like they're giving her a million bucks.
 

invidia

Platinum Member
Oct 8, 2006
2,151
1
0
This is fvcked up in two ways. She's dying. And she wants something she didn't earn. As long as it's not a Ph.D and from a top ranked college, or a goddamn Medal of Honor.......
 

jonessoda

Golden Member
Aug 3, 2005
1,407
1
0
No degree is the way to go. She didn't complete the requirements. Giving her a degree just because she's dying, without her having done the required work, would cheapen the degrees of others, IMO.
 

waggy

No Lifer
Dec 14, 2000
68,145
9
81
Originally posted by: LegendKiller
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
Originally posted by: LegendKiller

I have a feeling a lot of people really don't have any idea what it's like to go through cancer. I have had several people in my life die from it, my wife was afflicted at 26. The complete lack of empathy is disgusting.
I don't know what it's like to get killed by a rabid hamster, either, but I don't see what that has to do with someone receiving a degree that they did not earn. You are suggesting that they "just give it to her" because she's dying. This is illogical.

You get a degree when you earn it. Did she earn it? No.

The fact that she's dying, or has a kitten, or wears pink bunny slippers, or drives a Ford Taurus has no bearing on the fact that she did not meet the requirements to earn the degree.

I can understand an honorary one, but it sounds like the family is demanding a real one. Don't get me wrong- it's very sad that she's dying, but this has nothing to do with other unrelated issues.
Not everything in the world is logical, some things should be done to ease people's passing, if it's not a huge problem. It's not like they're giving her a million bucks.

yes some thing should be done to ease passing. such as giving her drugs. keeping her family near her. etc.

Giving her a dipoloma she DID NOT EARN is not one.

not to mention then anyone with a "life threatning" problem would want one. Then what if they survive? now they have a useless digree.

I am sorry she is dying of cancer (watched my aunt go through it. does not look fun) but htat had NOTHING to do with a degree.

though i guess she can get one on how to live with cancer heh
 

RaistlinZ

Diamond Member
Oct 15, 2001
7,629
9
91
For those of you saying they should give her the degree, what if she had requested a Master's? What if she requested a Ph.D? What if she wanted to be Dean of the university? Should they give those to her too? Where do you draw the line?

It's a tough position to be in, but I support the University for not giving in. It'll set a bad precident. An honorary degree would be the best compromise. And don't forget... they offered her a degree which she qualified for and she turned it down. :roll: Doesn't sound like a very grateful person IMO. I wouldn't give her the degree just based on that alone.
 

Chaotic42

Lifer
Jun 15, 2001
33,854
957
126
Originally posted by: dmcowen674
Originally posted by: SillyOReilly
A lot of you guys are hardasses.

You can't possibly be worried that she'll compete with your on a job.
Are you kidding?

Between illegal Mexicans at $3.00 hr and uncontrolled brain cancer patients, their jobs are toast.
My last job was taken by a Mexican with brain cancer. He was speaking some kind of weird gibberish language. He kept saying "Donde esta el baño" and then he wet himself.
 

DainBramaged

Lifer
Jun 19, 2003
23,385
11
81
National, State, and scholastic requirements dictate that she not get a full degree. She did not earn one.

Honorary degrees are given to people with exemplary lifetime achievements.

She doesn't deserve it.
 

Geekbabe

Moderator Emeritus<br>Elite Member
Oct 16, 1999
31,578
1,266
126
www.theshoppinqueen.com
The woman has enough credits to qualify for a ba,the only snag is she hadn't declared a major? I vote for giving her the degree,she has the credits.
 

compman25

Diamond Member
Jan 12, 2006
3,767
2
81
I'm dying too, I figure I have about 40 years left. I want a degree too. Give me one before I die.
 

Eli

Super Moderator | Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 9, 1999
50,422
7
81
Sad story, but I have to agree with the Dean.. I mean, what are they supposed to do?

If she wanted a certain degree, she should have taken those classes?.... I dunno.
 

Itchrelief

Golden Member
Dec 20, 2005
1,399
0
71
Originally posted by: Geekbabe
The woman has enough credits to qualify for a ba,the only snag is she hadn't declared a major? I vote for giving her the degree,she has the credits.
The other snag is probably she hasn't completed all of the required upper division courses for any single major. It's not like you can just take any courses and fill up the units to get a degree; they have specific courses in that major they require you to take. You can't get a chemistry degree without quantitative analysis, etc.

She probably has like 8 required courses out of 10 required for one major, 7/12 for another, 6/9 for a third, etc.

I mean, if she had, I'm sure they would have just given her one in whatever she happened to qualify for. She just didn't happen to qualify for any of them. Now, if I'm wrong and they won't give her a sheepskin because she never DECLARED a major but has fulfilled all the requirements for one, that's messed up, but I doubt that is the case.
 

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