Thermal paste

Nov 26, 2012
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#1
hey guys I have a question.
I bought i5 3350p CPU and when i unpack it, the stock cooler already had 3 lines with thermal paste. So I just puted it on CPu and runned system.
I turn on prime95 test for 20min, and max temperature was 65°C
And now I'm wondering if that's good or it should be lower. I personally think it would be better if the temperature would stay below 55°C or at least under 60°C. But I would like to hear your opinions aswell.

And also wondering if it would be better if I use my own thermal paste that I bought 6 months ago. It's called """akasa AK-455-5G, 5 g"""
Would be temeparure lower if I use that thermal paste?


Advice me pls :D
 
Nov 26, 2012
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#2
My thermal apaste looks like this:


and how the cpu cooler looked like:
 

Vesku

Diamond Member
Aug 25, 2005
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#3
I don't think it's worth swapping thermal material on the stock heatsink, 65C at Prime95 is fine.
 
Nov 26, 2012
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#4

bononos

Diamond Member
Aug 21, 2011
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#6

Ed1

Senior member
Jan 8, 2001
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#7
http://ark.intel.com/products/69114/Intel-Core-i5-3350P-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-3_30-GHz

Here it says that Tcase is 67°C and my temperature is near that ...
But I have no idea what does that Tcase means ... that means when CPU start trootling?
Tjmax is throttle max temp , which is 105c on 3rd gen i5/i7 .

this link may help
http://www.intel.com/support/processors/sb/CS-033342.htm?wapkw=tcase
http://www.alcpu.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=63&t=892

I would not worry about paste on stock cooler, it is just not going to help here . leave stock cooler or get better one if your trying to OC . If not OC your ok with those temps .

FWIW , my 3570k runs 61c with latest prime95 OC on cores 4.0 ,4.0, 3.9, 3.8ghz (depending on threading of app) . I am running 212 evo . when I run normal apps, like games it avg 50c max.

At stock clock it was around 58c with prime95for reference . So just remember no real apps stress as much as prime95 .
 
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Idontcare

Elite Member
Oct 10, 1999
21,126
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#8
hey guys I have a question.
I bought i5 3350p CPU and when i unpack it, the stock cooler already had 3 lines with thermal paste. So I just puted it on CPu and runned system.
I turn on prime95 test for 20min, and max temperature was 65°C
And now I'm wondering if that's good or it should be lower. I personally think it would be better if the temperature would stay below 55°C or at least under 60°C. But I would like to hear your opinions aswell.

And also wondering if it would be better if I use my own thermal paste that I bought 6 months ago. It's called """akasa AK-455-5G, 5 g"""
Would be temeparure lower if I use that thermal paste?


Advice me pls :D
Replacing the stock TIM on a stock HSF doesn't really pay dividends if you are not OC'ing.

Compare test cases 1 versus the results of tests 3 and 4.



If you want to improve your operating temperature then you need to replace that stock HSF - see tests 5-8.
 
Nov 26, 2012
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#9
Tcase is the advised maximum. You can use http://www.intel.com/support/processors/sb/CS-031726.htm if you want to check that everything is OK.

If you plan to run this chip at 100% 24/7 I'd advise getting an aftermarket cooler.
Well I'm not running it on 100% all the time hehe
Only when I play some game ... when nod32 is checking for viruses, some instalations ... normal stuffs that processor go to 100%.
At nigh only torrent is running so like 5% of CPU usage :)

Well if proccessor start throtling at 105°C I don't have to worry right now :)

But just wondering ... what would be temperature witch cheapet watter cooling system for CPU ?
 

Ferzerp

Diamond Member
Oct 12, 1999
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#10
You have no way of measuring Tcase. It's really a worthless value for the end user and only of value in the design process.
 
Apr 22, 2012
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#11
Never use the Tcase, because you cant measure it. Tcase is also only for OEMs/heatsink designers.

Everytime someone mention Tcase a baby dies!

65C is very good. The Tjmax is 105C. In short, just keep it under 105C. What programs measure is Tjunction.



This is the only way you can measure Tcase, and you actually need to damage the IHS to place it correctly:




Can we now finally stop using the Tcase word?
 
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Apr 22, 2012
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#12
And to the OP, just use the stock cooler with its default pad paste. Unless you wish to change cooler.
 

GPz1100

Senior member
Jun 10, 2001
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#13
Under normal usage, short of some serious gaming, rendering or some other very involved number crunching, you will never subject your cpu to loads equivalent of prime95 or IBT. While stock temps are warm, they are well within acceptable limits. Intel stock HSF is sufficient to meet the thermal needs of the processor. If you decide to get into overclocking, then consider other cooling solutions.

Also, be sure to enable the power saving functions of the board/cpu. No need to have the cpu pegged at max ghz under idle conditions.
 

Yuriman

Diamond Member
Jun 25, 2004
5,529
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#14
I don't think an aftermarket cooler will be necessary on a non-K CPU unless you're unhappy with the noise. Even if you have a Z75/Z77 board you'll probably be able to max your chip out with room to spare using the stock cooler.
 
Jun 30, 2004
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#15
Never use the Tcase, because you cant measure it. Tcase is also only for OEMs/heatsink designers.

Everytime someone mention Tcase a baby dies!

65C is very good. The Tjmax is 105C. In short, just keep it under 105C. What programs measure is Tjunction.



This is the only way you can measure Tcase, and you actually need to damage the IHS to place it correctly:




Can we now finally stop using the Tcase word?
I agree with all of this, and it is pretty much spot-on. The spec seems to be provided as a guideline for case design -- provided you could measure the temperature at center of IHS, or took the trouble and tedium to measure it.

That being said, some explanations and test results at Tom's Hardware going back to around 2005 or 2006 had done just that: to determine a difference between a TCASE value and the average TJunction or core temperatures. This established a loose rule-of-thumb that TCASE would lag behind the core readings by an amount between 10C and 15C for loaded CPUs over a range of common TDP wattages. You would then conclude that this differential was mostly a matter of the thermal properties of copper used to make the IHS and the IHS thickness -- assuming that INtel had used the fluxless silver-indium solder to mate the processor die to the bottom of the IHS. Of course, this latter factor changes with the Ivy Bridge processors.

If you worry much about staying within the TCASE spec guideline, the expected difference for pre-Ivy-Bridge cores gives you a ball-park estimate to follow from your averaged core temperature readings.

Otherwise, I suppose we'd just as soon desire the TCASE spec to "go away," since it's determined by the values measured by the core temperatures and the TjMax throttling limit is the most significant spec, anyway.
 
Nov 26, 2012
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#16
Well I tested it again with CoreTemp while playing game on all max setting + recording it with bandicam.
The temperature was max 58°C after few hours of playing.

So I guess I don't need to change anything so far :)
 
Apr 22, 2012
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#17
Well I tested it again with CoreTemp while playing game on all max setting + recording it with bandicam.
The temperature was max 58°C after few hours of playing.

So I guess I don't need to change anything so far :)
Exactly. And that temp you see in core temp just needs to be below 105C. Or the CPU will throttle. If it hit 135C the CPU will shutdown completely.
 

Idontcare

Elite Member
Oct 10, 1999
21,126
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#19
Otherwise, I suppose we'd just as soon desire the TCASE spec to "go away," since it's determined by the values measured by the core temperatures and the TjMax throttling limit is the most significant spec, anyway.
For enthusiasts and end-users, knowing that Tcase exists as a spec metric is about as useful as knowing VIDs exist.

At best people will rightly know they can safely ignore both, equally acceptable is that they ignore them for the wrong reasons (but ignore them nevertheless), and at worst people confuse TCase for TMax and VID for Vcc/Vmax.

TCase as a spec value must exist for the engineers who design heatsinks and cases (including laptops, tablets, etc). When designing a cooler you do not care how hot the CPU is, you need to know how hot the surface is that your cooler is actually coming in contact with (i.e. the surface of the IHS, which is why TCase is defined at that location).
 

wpcoe

Senior member
Nov 13, 2007
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#20
I don't think an aftermarket cooler will be necessary on a non-K CPU unless you're unhappy with the noise.
That's my initial thought, as well. The temperature seems okay, but how is the noise? Many people find the stock Intel coolers too noisy, although my i3-3225 seems quiet enough (except on system boot when it spins up rather loudly.)
 

Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
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#21
Undervolt the cpu a bit.
 
Apr 22, 2012
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#22
That's my initial thought, as well. The temperature seems okay, but how is the noise? Many people find the stock Intel coolers too noisy, although my i3-3225 seems quiet enough (except on system boot when it spins up rather loudly.)
I dont hear the stock cooler at all. Main noise in the system comes from the GPU.
 

Ferzerp

Diamond Member
Oct 12, 1999
6,426
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#23
I dont hear the stock cooler at all. Main noise in the system comes from the GPU.

I have an HTPC with one fan (the cpu fan). I'm using an i5-3450 in it with the stock cooler. It's in my bedroom with nothing else on, and once every few weeks before I sleep I will hear a faint hum from the fan, but typically, it's silent.

Now keep in mind that I overspecced the CPU so that it would stay mostly idle and cool (extra cores = extra silicon so that it deals with intermittent loads and weaker cooling easier).
 

bononos

Diamond Member
Aug 21, 2011
3,617
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#24
That's my initial thought, as well. The temperature seems okay, but how is the noise? Many people find the stock Intel coolers too noisy, although my i3-3225 seems quiet enough (except on system boot when it spins up rather loudly.)
Its noisy at boot up because I think the fan speed settings(pwm) in the bios haven't kicked in yet (as well as all the voltage/speed settings) so everything is running at full speed. I notice the noise when I'm spending some time making changes in the bios menu.
 


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