The wife wants a dog

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DrPizza

Administrator Elite Member Goat Whisperer
Mar 5, 2001
49,606
166
111
www.slatebrookfarm.com
They're $800 because that's what supply and demand supports. 20 years ago, if a lab and a poodle bred, it was a mutt that was given away. Now, it's a labradoodle, and demand is high.

Anyway, I've owned dogs my entire life. Only one has required expensive vet care (well under $1000 though.). The rest only needed routine shots and anti-flea stuff in the summer. When I was growing up, my mother bred Maltese and yorkshire terriers. If your wife is really into it, do a TON of research into the breed. know the standards for the breed, problems with the breed, etc. Do a ton of research on the female you'll be purchasing. You should be able to find a breeder with excellent records, and should be able to do some research on the lineage, looking for problems. You need to know what questions to ask. Then, after having your female for a year, you might consider looking for a stud for her (either purchasing it, else paying a stud fee.). Here, records are even more important to avoid inbreeding problems, etc. it's not that hard to do it right though.

Bassett hounds average about 8 puppies per litter. You said it yourself - there aren't any breeders in your area. Do the math. I assume females are more expensive than males. I know a few people who prefer the females for hunting. So, let's say 4@$800+4@$600. After vet expenses, first shots, etc., that's a healthy hunk of change. But, first and foremost, they need to be members of your family. For what it's worth, this similar to what I do with myotonic goats. You think 300 miles is bad? I've traveled 1100 miles each way to purchase a single goat. And 400 miles each way. And 500 miles each way, and... All for the best genetics I could obtain, with lineages being incredibly important. Usually it works out well, sometimes it doesn't. Any evidence of genetic problems equals that particular goat is no longer a part of the breeding program. (and i'm out a chunk of money) That is, after your first litter, if you see a problem with *any* of the puppies, you're through. Your dogs should not be bred again, because there's a gene that shouldn't be passed on. For us, we've been very successful, with goats from the lineages we've developed winning best of shows, championships, and junior championships in shows.
 

Mr. Lennon

Diamond Member
Jul 2, 2004
3,492
1
81
Never owned a dog...wants a shitty purebread for nostalgia...wants to breed said dog despite knowing absolutely nothing about what that entails.

OP, sorry but your wife is a dumbass. She wants a dog for all the wrong reasons. Stance of dominance is needed here.
 

AstroManLuca

Lifer
Jun 24, 2004
15,628
5
81
Never owned a dog...wants a shitty purebread for nostalgia...wants to breed said dog despite knowing absolutely nothing about what that entails.

OP, sorry but your wife is a dumbass. She wants a dog for all the wrong reasons. Stance of dominance is needed here.

I agree, put your foot down on this one. Shelter or bust. Shelter dogs are nicer, less expensive, have fewer health problems, and you're doing the world a service by adopting them instead of supporting wasteful breeders. Plus you don't have to deal with puppies shitting everywhere.
 

Sixguns

Platinum Member
May 22, 2011
2,258
2
81
Never owned a dog...wants a shitty purebread for nostalgia...wants to breed said dog despite knowing absolutely nothing about what that entails.

OP, sorry but your wife is a dumbass. She wants a dog for all the wrong reasons. Stance of dominance is needed here.


She grew up with dogs and has always wanted this one but never had the chance. The breeding part she thought of just for being able to sell and has looked up stuff about this type of breed. And how is wanting a dog that reminds you of your dad a wrong reason?
 

NFS4

No Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
72,647
26
91
She grew up with dogs and has always wanted this one but never had the chance. The breeding part she thought of just for being able to sell and has looked up stuff about this type of breed. And how is wanting a dog that reminds you of your dad a wrong reason?

I understand the "want", I understand it completely. It reminds her of her dad and of her youth. Anyone that doesn't get that is the dumbass in this equation.

The only thing I'd be worried about is the breeding part, because it's not for those that don't have the time nor the direction to do it. But as long as she wants the dog, and wants to put the time into raising it and taking care of it, I don't see the harm in getting her what she wants.

Screw all the "buy a mutt" people in here. You have to live with your wife, not them.
 

HumblePie

Lifer
Oct 30, 2000
14,667
440
126
Meh, I've been in the same position as the OP. My fiancee grew up with 101 dalmations and really wants a pure bred dalmation. NO FUCKING WAY. Told her straight up I'm never going to own one. I can deal with "active" dogs, but I can't deal with hyper active dogs. I don't have the yard for it.

She also wants a great dane, preferably a spotted one that looks like a big dalmation. Again I told her, NO FUCKING WAY. Danes live for 5-7 years, health problems, eat a ton of food and poop a ton. At least they aren't hyper active at all. They are lazy, but a very expensive breed.

But she's been pestering me and pestering me.

Finally we were outside of petsmart last weekend and there was a shelter running adoptions. They had a pointer/heeler mix. Heelers are active, but not hyper active. Pointers are hunting, but aren't overly active. Heelers are prone to biting though. Hence their name.

Still I managed to cave in on that one. Had it for a week and it's been going good. The puppy looks like an almost pure bred blue heeler though. Very spotty coat which gives my fiancee the "dalmation" dog look that she was wanting in a dog. Not exactly all spots, but good enough.

I really suggest putting your foot down and doing some research "together" with her over this. I know I did.

Also for reference, my fiancee also still wants a basset hound for the exact same reason the OP's wife does. That stupid fucking movie.
 

shopbruin

Diamond Member
Jul 12, 2000
5,817
0
0
I understand the "want", I understand it completely. It reminds her of her dad and of her youth. Anyone that doesn't get that is the dumbass in this equation.

The only thing I'd be worried about is the breeding part, because it's not for those that don't have the time nor the direction to do it. But as long as she wants the dog, and wants to put the time into raising it and taking care of it, I don't see the harm in getting her what she wants.

Screw all the "buy a mutt" people in here. You have to live with your wife, not them.

Being reasonable is not allowed on this forum!
 

Capt Caveman

Lifer
Jan 30, 2005
34,547
651
126
I always read that...but in truth, my ridgeback isn't any more difficult or stubborn than my old golden was...you definitely have to train them, and you have to be more careful doing so than with other dogs, since he's so sensitive. If you tell at him too much or you're too rough with him, he just pouts and won't do shit. But he can practically learn to do my taxes if you have enough cookies to keep him interested!

Well, my current ridgeback is a rescue. College kid bought the dog and left it with the parents when he went to school. The parents couldn't handle his high energy level and was given up to rescue.

Ridgebacks are quite the opposite of a golden and would not recommend it to someone who's not ready for energy level and not committed to spending a lot of time with consistent training.

Being in Ridgeback Rescue, too many people get Ridgebacks and don't know what they're getting into.
 

MagnusTheBrewer

IN MEMORIAM
Jun 19, 2004
24,135
1,594
126
Basset Hounds aren't the brightest pup in the pack. However, whatever breed you get, both you and your wife have to want to take care of it. Dogs aren't accessories, they are not toys and, they are not disposable even when they eat your remote, favorite shoes and piss on your computer. If both of you are not willing to care for the dog, do NOT get one.
 

Ns1

No Lifer
Jun 17, 2001
55,413
1,570
126
you could always rescue a purebreed ^_^

I know what you're going through OP, my first was a purebred from a breeder, my second was a purebred from an organization.

you could always go this route, and it would cost you well less than $800.
 

Capt Caveman

Lifer
Jan 30, 2005
34,547
651
126
you could always rescue a purebreed ^_^

I know what you're going through OP, my first was a purebred from a breeder, my second was a purebred from an organization.

you could always go this route, and it would cost you well less than $800.

Correct. Both my dachshund and ridgeback are both rescues. Since, the OP is in New Mexico, All Ears Basset Sanctuary in Albuquerque has a number of them.

http://www.petfinder.com/pet-search...+Hound&location=New+Mexico&startsearch=Search
 

Sixguns

Platinum Member
May 22, 2011
2,258
2
81
I wouldnt mind having a dog again. I remember when I was in the 1st grade. My family had just moved to Utah (not Mormon) and didnt fit in. My dad went out and got us an English Pointer. That dog was like my best friend for the longest time. I was really sad when we had to but him down, he lived to be 13ish but had cancer really bad, and I know what kind of company they can be when you are home alone. I have been showing her a lot of the negative as well with the positives. The breeding is a no go no matter what dog we get since there is just way to much work involved.
 

alkemyst

No Lifer
Feb 13, 2001
83,967
19
81
you could always rescue a purebreed ^_^

I know what you're going through OP, my first was a purebred from a breeder, my second was a purebred from an organization.

you could always go this route, and it would cost you well less than $800.

QFT. I don't know why people who claim to know a lot about a breed make it that all adoptables are mutts.

In this economy a lot of breed-specific rescues are overloaded.
 

alkemyst

No Lifer
Feb 13, 2001
83,967
19
81
Basset Hounds aren't the brightest pup in the pack. However, whatever breed you get, both you and your wife have to want to take care of it. Dogs aren't accessories, they are not toys and, they are not disposable even when they eat your remote, favorite shoes and piss on your computer. If both of you are not willing to care for the dog, do NOT get one.

Brightest dogs are actually bad things for most owners.

Almost any dog is capable of the basic commands most owners would need.

A smart dog will want attention whenever you are around and not settle for just continuing it's daily nap.

I have a cattle dog and the level of attention he requires most would be unhappy with.

The main issue with Bassett's are their stubborness rather than intelligence. Being they are strong and low to the ground makes it easy for them to assert themselves against their owners. This can be trained out of them, but most give up.