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The Pre-built ATX tower hot deals thread.

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VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
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https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883286403&ignorebbr=1

Newegg ShellShocker

HP A Grade Desktop Computer 600 G1 - SFF Intel Core i5 4th Gen 3.2 GHz 8 GB DDR3 500 GB HDD Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Free Bluetooth VR headset w/ purchase, limited offer
REFURBISHED


$229.99 - $20 MIR = $209.99.

4th Gen is Haswell, I think. So this is a fairly recent PC.

I've noticed more Haswell (4th Gen) quad-core refurb / off-lease units showing up. These should be somewhat significantly faster than the Sandy (2nd Gen) and Ivy (3rd Gen) quad-core refurb machines, and should have a significantly faster iGPU.

Edit: Here's an ebay listing from Newegg for a similar PC for a higher price.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/HP-Desktop-Computer-600-G1-Intel-Core-i5-4th-Gen-4590-3-30-GHz-8-GB-DDR3-1-TB-/302149219112?epid=1966897102
(For images ONLY.)

Edit: These would make a darn nice gaming PC, if you dropped in a low-profile GT1030 or GTX1050/ti.

Probably easily as good as a Kaby Lake G4560-based gaming PC, and probably better in thread-heavy titles like GTA5 and BF1.

That would set you back $210 + $140 or so, or $350. Which is what you could build a G4560 gaming PC for, minus OS.
 
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jiffer

Senior member
Sep 14, 2007
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If you get an HP 600 G1, you'll probably have to stick with a GeForce GT 1030. It only has a 240W power supply, and the case doesn't have great airflow. There's a quiet (therefore slow RPM) fan in the power supply and a 60mm fan dedicated to cooling the CPU which in my opinion is barely adequate for a Haswell. (When Intel decided to move the voltage regulators from the motherboard to the CPU die, it made their Haswell processors run hotter than Ivy Bridge in spite of the die shrink.) The GeForce 1050 and 1050 Ti models are rated at 75W, while the 1030 is only rated at 30W, which in my opinion makes it perfectly suited for this particular application.

I don't think the low profile 1050's require a PCI-E power connector, but it should be noted that the proprietary power supply does not have conventional power leads. Check out the images here to see what I mean:
http://partsurfer.hp.com/ShowPhoto.aspx?partnumber=702457-001
 

cbn

Lifer
Mar 27, 2009
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If you get an HP 600 G1, you'll probably have to stick with a GeForce GT 1030. It only has a 240W power supply
On the HP Elite 8200 and HP Elite 8300 SFF desktops the 240W PSU has two 12v rails with 16 amps each.

If the HP 600 G1 has the same amount of amps on the 12v rails then I wouldn't hesistate to use it with a GTX 1050 Ti.

EDIT: Found two listings for the HP 600 G1 SFF psu here and here. Both listings show two 12v rails with 16 amps each.
 
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cbn

Lifer
Mar 27, 2009
12,968
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If you get an HP 600 G1......(snip).... case doesn't have great airflow. There's a quiet (therefore slow RPM) fan in the power supply and a 60mm fan dedicated to cooling the CPU which in my opinion is barely adequate for a Haswell.
Are we sure it is a 60mm fan?

When took a look at the HP DC5800 (a Core 2 sff machine with similar form factor) about three years ago it had a 92mm intake fan and 92mm fan PSU fan (acting as exhaust).
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
51,943
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If the HP 600 G1 has the same amount of amps on the 12v rails then I wouldn't hesistate to use it with a GTX 1050 Ti.
Yeah, I'd probably chance it, if I bought one of these. If I had the money right now, I would, but I spent almost that much on just a Ryzen CPU recently.
 

jiffer

Senior member
Sep 14, 2007
350
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91
Are we sure it is a 60mm fan?

When took a look at the HP DC5800 (a Core 2 sff machine with similar form factor) about three years ago it had a 92mm intake fan and 92mm fan PSU fan (acting as exhaust).
Sorry for the delay in getting back to you. I had a 600 G1 a couple of years ago and it was a nice little machine. The part number for the heatsink/fan assembly is 727150-001 if you want to look it up. I'm not sure the fan is exactly 60mm x 60mm but it's definitely smaller than an 80mm fan. I can't find the dimensions for the heatsink anywhere but the case is 100mm (3.9 inches) tall, so if you subtract room for the motherboard standoffs, the CPU socket and a minimal amount of clearance, the heatsink can't be more than 75mm tall. The older models you're referring to have a completely different case design. The 92mm intake fan is mounted on the front side of the case and a plastic duct funnels the air to a 60mm CPU heatsink. The 600 G1 is kind of like the reverse of that; the fan is mounted to the heatsink and the duct leads to a vent in the back of the case above the ports. The 92mm exhaust fan in the older models is the power supply fan. In the 600 G1, the power supply fan is smaller (probably 80mm). It's not the same kind of power supply (please refer to HP part number 613763-001).

The labels on the sides of the older as well as the newer power supplies do indeed state that they have two 12V rails rated up to 16 Amps each, but it also says that the combined output must not exceed 240W. Doesn't that mean the combined output cannot exceed 20 Amps? 17 Amps on a single 12V rail (204 Watts) is what you usually see on a 240W power supply.
 
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cbn

Lifer
Mar 27, 2009
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The labels on the sides of the older as well as the newer power supplies do indeed state that they have two 12V rails rated up to 16 Amps each, but it also says that the combined output must not exceed 240W. Doesn't that mean the combined output cannot exceed 20 Amps? 17 Amps on a single 12V rail (204 Watts) is what you usually see on a 240W power supply.
Yep, combined output on both 12v rails cannot exceed 20amps (ie, 240W).....but this is plenty for a GTX 1050 Ti.
 

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