The new iPad Pro

Zaap

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Jun 12, 2008
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ippro.jpg

Today had my first hands on with the new iPad Pro at a Best Buy here in Los Angeles. My first impressions are that this tablet is indeed a game changer.

My main focus was the Apple pencil function- drawing is an absolute pleasure on these. Nothing I've used comes close- this is the pinnacle of pen input IMO. The feel of the pressure levels, flawless palm rejection and the fact you can lay the pencil on edge to do shading like a real world drawing tool- absolutely stunning. No lag what-so ever, and the feel of drawing/writing to me was as good as pen/paper.

The screen is gorgeous. The best viewing experience of any tablet, hands down.

Love the thin bezels. I personally never want a tablet again with anything around the edges thicker than this. Thank god for no notches or other lazy design elements- the look and feel is just clean and ultra- modern.

For media consumption- it's almost overkill. I'm guessing mobile gaming will advance a step or two on hardware this good.

Apple is so far out ahead with tablet technology with these- much as I prefer Android for phones, there's just *nothing* in the Android universe even playing in the same ballpark. I feel somewhat like I did the first time I saw an iPhone- love it or hate it, you just knew it was going to change everything, and everyone would be copying it as the new standard from that point on. Same deal IMO with the new iPad, as far as a 'pro' level tablet device.

I've generally liked Apple's iPad designs up to this point, but felt they were just really good devices that fit in the same tablet universe as everything else.

This new iPad to me feels like a device unto itself- there's NOTHING in the same arena, not even the Surface. To me it felt just THAT good. I could see it replacing a laptop for serious work (photo editing, drawing, illustration, desktop publishing, etc.) easily whereas every tablet before now has felt like it's lacking, feel and performance wise. Doesn't hurt that it's turning in amazing performance scores.

Of course there are things I dislike. The continued pretense that there's no file system. No headphone jack. All this amazing power and not a @$#*@ sd slot or reasonable removable storage option in an age when near endless amounts of storage are dirt cheap- just lame. I just wish Apple will move toward making the iPad more like a true laptop replacement, by letting it have laptop worthy features. But option-stinginess comes with the iOS territory.

The price: for what these tablets actually are- laptops in a different form factor, with potential to be a Cintiq-killing drawing experience and laptop-level performance- the prices seem fair. I balk a little of course at 'movie theatre popcorn pricing scheme' starting at a piddly 64GB. Still, $800 and $1000 for the base-level models of a device this good doesn't seem unreasonable to me.

Curious people's thoughts, or does anyone care? Maybe Apple is off the mark making an expensive prosumer-level tablet in an age where people just want cheap consumption devices? Maybe most needing this level of firepower (and price) would just prefer a traditional laptop? I dunno. For the prosumer markets that exist, I have to believe this is a new benchmark.
 
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IronWing

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Your point about the lack of a file system and ability to move files to and from the iPad is spot on. There are workarounds like the very good FileBrowser app but workarounds shouldn't be necessary. My wife has the 11" wifi-only model and loves it. We're both still learning IOS so I can't really offer much more commentary until I learn the device.
 
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It seems like a great device, and is powerful enough to push laptops and Surface in productivity these days, while offering some advantages and being cheaper (depending on config). Not perfect certainly, but there aren't any perfect devices. Android tablets aren't worth even mentioning in relation to this. Maybe we'll get some interesting 2 in 1s when they finish Fuchsia, but that's probably years away if it ever even happens. Microsoft should be pushing for Windows on ARM more because the iPad is going to start decimating the Surface line. It'll be thinner, as or more powerful, get better battery life, and have all the productivity apps that Windows does (including Office). The Surface Pro and Surface Book would be especially great, where they turn them into bridge devices, where on battery they operate on the ARM, and then the normal Surface can dock (which helps both cooling and power), and use x86 cores less constrained. The Surface Book just have an ARM chip in the tablet part so its actually usable that way (I had one, the battery life when using just the tablet part was bad), and then an x86 CPU and GPU in the base (which will help balance it better as it was awkward as a laptop due to the poor weight balance).

While the Pencil is definitely improved (really cannot fathom what they were thinking with the original one not having any way of securing it, not even a clip, and it plugging into the Lightning port), I can't believe they didn't add an eraser. Even more I think they could've integrated a microphone or remote shutter button into it as well, or maybe something even more interesting (like a sensor where you could have it "scan" a color in the real world and automatically make that color digitally).
 

Zaap

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Your point about the lack of a file system and ability to move files to and from the iPad is spot on. There are workarounds like the very good FileBrowser app but workarounds shouldn't be necessary. My wife has the 11" wifi-only model and loves it. We're both still learning IOS so I can't really offer much more commentary until I learn the device.
I really like the size of the 11" model. Interested to hear what you think of using it after you've had some time with it.



It seems like a great device, and is powerful enough to push laptops and Surface in productivity these days, while offering some advantages and being cheaper (depending on config). Not perfect certainly, but there aren't any perfect devices. Android tablets aren't worth even mentioning in relation to this. Maybe we'll get some interesting 2 in 1s when they finish Fuchsia, but that's probably years away if it ever even happens. Microsoft should be pushing for Windows on ARM more because the iPad is going to start decimating the Surface line. It'll be thinner, as or more powerful, get better battery life, and have all the productivity apps that Windows does (including Office). The Surface Pro and Surface Book would be especially great, where they turn them into bridge devices, where on battery they operate on the ARM, and then the normal Surface can dock (which helps both cooling and power), and use x86 cores less constrained. The Surface Book just have an ARM chip in the tablet part so its actually usable that way (I had one, the battery life when using just the tablet part was bad), and then an x86 CPU and GPU in the base (which will help balance it better as it was awkward as a laptop due to the poor weight balance).

While the Pencil is definitely improved (really cannot fathom what they were thinking with the original one not having any way of securing it, not even a clip, and it plugging into the Lightning port), I can't believe they didn't add an eraser. Even more I think they could've integrated a microphone or remote shutter button into it as well, or maybe something even more interesting (like a sensor where you could have it "scan" a color in the real world and automatically make that color digitally).

I agree, really the Surface is the only thing close. It'd be typical of Microsoft to drop the ball though- years of experience with device type, only to never take it to the next level, then boom- along comes Apple and others who do it right and surpass them. Basically, that was their story with PDA's and smartphones, now it wouldn't surprise me with tablet/laptop replacements.

I really like how the new pencil attaches magnetically to the iPad. It also has tap features that switch it into erase mode (or last used tool) so really I don't think it needs a permanent eraser at the opposite end. Testing it out I was able to tap and switch to erasing so quickly that the function surpasses real paper/pencil where there's a delay turning a pencil around.
 
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I really like the size of the 11" model. Interested to hear what you think of using it after you've had some time with it.





I agree, really the Surface is the only thing close. It'd be typical of Microsoft to drop the ball though- years of experience with device type, only to never take it to the next level, then boom- along comes Apple and others who do it right and surpass them. Basically, that was their story with PDA's and smartphones, now it wouldn't surprise me with tablet/laptop replacements.

I really like how the new pencil attaches magnetically to the iPad. It also has tap features that switch it into erase mode (or last used tool) so really I don't think it needs a permanent eraser at the opposite end. Testing it out I was able to tap and switch to erasing so quickly that the function surpasses real paper/pencil where there's a delay turning a pencil around.

Oh guarantee Microsoft will let Apple walk away with that market. It already was traditionally a strong Apple market (the pro/creator/artist market), that Microsoft made inroads in simply out of luck (mostly Apple's weird "we're not going to make a hybrid device, its either a tablet - which for Apple seemed to be very consumer/consumption focused - or a laptop; which I find it funny how Apple outright mocked the Surface line and 2 n 1s, only for them to now be marketing the iPad Pro line like they have been), only for Apple to just bide their time. The craziest part is that Apple is actually better value than Microsoft's stuff these days (the Surface Studio pricing is just plain stupid for what you're getting).

That's why I think Microsoft should change things up and make Surface modern developer friendly, where they've got ARM cores to test out on (and use when they're out and about and just checking emails and simple things), and then have a setup where it can have less mobile constrained x86 hardware for more serious work.

Microsoft no longer cares too much about devices, they're all about services, so they'll let their hardware languish as they transition. They'll still make devices, but it seems like its mostly about trying to push others to make them. Which I'd almost be fine with, but man they could be doing so much more to push things.

Yeah the magnetic aspect is nice (definitely enjoyed that about the Surface Pen) and huge upgrade over the literal nothing from the first pencil. I saw that, and maybe that will be true, especially for younger people that have grown up entirely in the digital age so don't have so much of the pencil/eraser physical memory ingrained. I know Apple likes to keep things simple, but I really feel like there's potential going unrealized. The Surface line has the click feature as well, as well as the eraser (and the eraser also serving as a real button), so you get the eraser feature plus two buttons to customize for what use you want so you could have it function like the Pencil if you desire. I noticed some apps did work better by ignoring the eraser simply because the program had a locked in default eraser behavior that wasn't great, but to me that's why it should be able to be customized. I really liked the dial-dongle thing that Microsoft came up with for the Surface Studio. I'd love a multitude of them in different sizes, and think they'd be a great way to let people customize the UI on touch screen devices. I think it'd be great for cars as well now that we're getting huge touch displays to control features. Especially for vehicles like Tesla where they're trying to get rid of buttons and dials and things. Certain features just work so much better with some tactile thing.
 

quikah

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The craziest part is that Apple is actually better value than Microsoft's stuff these days (the Surface Studio pricing is just plain stupid for what you're getting).

A cintiq 24 with touch is $2.5k, if you want a stand similar to studio that is another $500. Surface studio is not so expensive comparatively and you get 28" display. It is more limited though since you are constrained by the CPU/GPU in the studio, but whether that is an issue is down to the user (as is the pro/con of getting Wacom pen instead of the n-trig surface uses).
 

killster1

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Did you check the bend test? i wouldn't get one of these.

Mainly because im paranoid about dropping / standing on it (not from myself). the ipad mini 4 can withstand being thrown into the wall, used as a snow shoe, etc ;)
 

IronWing

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Did you check the bend test?
LOL! Did you check the "hit it with a hammer" test? For electronics not advertized as ruggedized, I don't see treating them with some care as an unnecessary burden on the user.
 

killster1

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LOL! Did you check the "hit it with a hammer" test? For electronics not advertized as ruggedized, I don't see treating them with some care as an unnecessary burden on the user.


No no i realize that nothing is bulletproof and that its not even advertised as any sort of kids device, but it folds like a wallet. Id have to lean toward design flaw.
 
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A cintiq 24 with touch is $2.5k, if you want a stand similar to studio that is another $500. Surface studio is not so expensive comparatively and you get 28" display. It is more limited though since you are constrained by the CPU/GPU in the studio, but whether that is an issue is down to the user (as is the pro/con of getting Wacom pen instead of the n-trig surface uses).

Oh Wacom stuff is stupid expensive too (and I'm glad that the Surface line and iPad Pros are giving people great alternatives for those that need good pen input, meanwhile in the other direction those cheap off brand digitizer displays are good enough for people on a budget so they're not stuck with the non-display Wacom stuff - you can get 15.6" IPS 1080p battery free pen digitizer displays for $300 pretty easy, and 20" ones with similar are like $500 and below - you can get the Monoprice one for ~$350-400 on some of their promotions).

The studio line has worse hardware than the regular iMac line (and the Pro really eclipses it, which yes it quickly does in price as well, but a fully loaded Studio is around the base iMac Pro, with the latter having quite a bit more power other than for gaming graphics). Yes I know it has the pen input and iMacs don't, which definitely matters (and all 3 are pretty damn expensive). Microsoft really should have made it so people could upgrade just the processing part of the Studio versus having to upgrade the entire thing. You could probably get a regular iMac with roughly equal if not possibly a bit better (depending on need, like if you're more CPU bound) hardware, plus a Surface Book or iPad Pro for the cost of the Studio. And while the Studio would probably provide a bit better experience for pen experience, I don't think it'd be that drastic and you'd have a portable device to take with you.

Which, I don't know why Apple isn't adding Pencil support to the iMac, as it would undercut the Studio. Heck, if it came with its own special stand and the pencil for $500 it'd let the iMac compete with the Surface Studio.

Er, where are you getting that a stand similar to the Studio's is $500? Is that the Wacom branded, very similar to the Studio stand? Because you can find gas spring arm mounts for $100 easy and they'd be more versatile than the Studio's stand. Heck, I'm pretty sure you could have a custom frame to enable VESA mounting made for less than $500.

Don't get me wrong, I love the Studio as a product, and I get that its basically targeted at wealthy professionals (if not ones that work at wealthy corporations and have the need for its niche) and probably art schools, but I feel like relatively minor compromises would make it a lot cheaper. And other changes would make it a lot better (and worth its price). The stand is ok, but I'm not that impressed with it since they could have a much more versatile one for probably less money, and it wouldn't be tied to the processing box (which is made needlessly small, hindering performance and longevity).
 

quikah

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Er, where are you getting that a stand similar to the Studio's is $500? Is that the Wacom branded, very similar to the Studio stand? Because you can find gas spring arm mounts for $100 easy and they'd be more versatile than the Studio's stand. Heck, I'm pretty sure you could have a custom frame to enable VESA mounting made for less than $500.

Don't get me wrong, I love the Studio as a product, and I get that its basically targeted at wealthy professionals (if not ones that work at wealthy corporations and have the need for its niche) and probably art schools, but I feel like relatively minor compromises would make it a lot cheaper. And other changes would make it a lot better (and worth its price). The stand is ok, but I'm not that impressed with it since they could have a much more versatile one for probably less money, and it wouldn't be tied to the processing box (which is made needlessly small, hindering performance and longevity).

Yeah, the stand is from Wacom site, sure you can get 3rd party for cheaper. Studio is a niche device and like most of the surface line it is really a reference design intended to spur the OEMs to make better Windows devices (IMO they have succeeded, the PC landscape is MUCH improved the past few years). The studio stand is actually pretty amazing to me. It works so flawlessly, I have a Dell XPS 27, that stand is downright clunky, it is a struggle to maneuver it.

Rumor I heard is they are planning to release a new studio next year with a modular core that can be upgraded. Everyone wants them to just release the monitor as a standalone.
 
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lopri

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I am not a fan of the new design as well as removal of fingerprint authentication, but its performance is mind-boggling.

Is it now a single-user device, or can multiple Face IDs can be registered?
 

TheStu

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I am not a fan of the new design as well as removal of fingerprint authentication, but its performance is mind-boggling.

Is it now a single-user device, or can multiple Face IDs can be registered?
It is, as it has always been, a single user device. You can train 2 faces (the idea being that your life/job requires face coverings some of the time you can still have the phone unlock).
 

ViolaVila

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Dec 19, 2018
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View attachment 1108

Today had my first hands on with the new iPad Pro at a Best Buy here in Los Angeles. My first impressions are that this tablet is indeed a game changer.

My main focus was the Apple pencil function- drawing is an absolute pleasure on these. Nothing I've used comes close- this is the pinnacle of pen input IMO. The feel of the pressure levels, flawless palm rejection and the fact you can lay the pencil on edge to do shading like a real world drawing tool- absolutely stunning. No lag what-so ever, and the feel of drawing/writing to me was as good as pen/paper.

The screen is gorgeous. The best viewing experience of any tablet, hands down.

Love the thin bezels. I personally never want a tablet again with anything around the edges thicker than this. Thank god for no notches or other lazy design elements- the look and feel is just clean and ultra- modern.

For media consumption- it's almost overkill. I'm guessing mobile gaming will advance a step or two on hardware this good.

Apple is so far out ahead with tablet technology with these- much as I prefer Android for phones, there's just *nothing* in the Android universe even playing in the same ballpark. I feel somewhat like I did the first time I saw an iPhone- love it or hate it, you just knew it was going to change everything, and everyone would be copying it as the new standard from that point on. Same deal IMO with the new iPad, as far as a 'pro' level tablet device.

I've generally liked Apple's iPad designs up to this point, but felt they were just really good devices that fit in the same tablet universe as everything else.

This new iPad to me feels like a device unto itself- there's NOTHING in the same arena, not even the Surface. To me it felt just THAT good. I could see it replacing a laptop for serious work (photo editing, drawing, illustration, desktop publishing, etc.) easily whereas every tablet before now has felt like it's lacking, feel and performance wise. Doesn't hurt that it's turning in amazing performance scores.

Of course there are things I dislike. The continued pretense that there's no file system. No headphone jack. All this amazing power and not a @$#*@ sd slot or reasonable removable storage option in an age when near endless amounts of storage are dirt cheap- just lame. I just wish Apple will move toward making the iPad more like a true laptop replacement, by letting it have laptop worthy features. But option-stinginess comes with the iOS territory.

The price: for what these tablets actually are- laptops in a different form factor, with potential to be a Cintiq-killing drawing experience and laptop-level performance- the prices seem fair. I balk a little of course at 'movie theatre popcorn pricing scheme' starting at a piddly 64GB. Still, $800 and $1000 for the base-level models of a device this good doesn't seem unreasonable to me.

Curious people's thoughts, or does anyone care? Maybe Apple is off the mark making an expensive prosumer-level tablet in an age where people just want cheap consumption devices? Maybe most needing this level of firepower (and price) would just prefer a traditional laptop? I dunno. For the prosumer markets that exist, I have to believe this is a new benchmark.
So, how's your iPad Pro going so far? I plan to buy one for my friend who is an artist, but I am struggling between iPad models like iPad Mini, iPad Air and iPad Pro.
 
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Zaap

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So, how's your iPad Pro going so far? I plan to buy one for my friend who is an artist, but I am struggling between iPad models like iPad Mini, iPad Air and iPad Pro.
I should clarify- I don't own one yet myself.

Personally if you're buying for an artist, I'd say it really depends on the type of art they do and will they benefit from the strengths of the Pro, vs an Air or Mini.

If it's a struggle to determine- it sounds to me like a Pro probably isn't a given for them. For me, even though I work in animation and related graphic art, I don't personally create enough professional artwork by myself to justify the iPad Pro as needed.

But if I was strictly a commercial artist by trade that already needs a Wacom tablet, Cintiq or the previous iPad Pro/first gen Pencil- then I'd say look into a 2018 Pro for them.
 
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TheStu

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So, how's your iPad Pro going so far? I plan to buy one for my friend who is an artist, but I am struggling between iPad models like iPad Mini, iPad Air and iPad Pro.
The iPad mini is outdated and does not support the Pencil. The iPad Air is ALSO outdated (it's 3 generations old at this point. It was superseded by the Air 2, the 2017 iPad and now the 2018 iPad) and ALSO doesn't support the Pencil.

I'd recommend that you start with the current entry level 9.7" iPad. It's really fast, supports the Pencil (first gen), AND starts at $329 which is a great price.
 
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ViolaVila

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I should clarify- I don't own one yet myself.

Personally if you're buying for an artist, I'd say it really depends on the type of art they do and will they benefit from the strengths of the Pro, vs an Air or Mini.

If it's a struggle to determine- it sounds to me like a Pro probably isn't a given for them. For me, even though I work in animation and related graphic art, I don't personally create enough professional artwork by myself to justify the iPad Pro as needed.

But if I was strictly a commercial artist by trade that already needs a Wacom tablet, Cintiq or the previous iPad Pro/first gen Pencil- then I'd say look into a 2018 Pro for them.
T
The iPad mini is outdated and does not support the Pencil. The iPad Air is ALSO outdated (it's 3 generations old at this point. It was superseded by the Air 2, the 2017 iPad and now the 2018 iPad) and ALSO doesn't support the Pencil.

I'd recommend that you start with the current entry level 9.7" iPad. It's really fast, supports the Pencil (first gen), AND starts at $329 which is a great price.
Thank youuuu....Really detailed information. Gonna ask what he would like. I don't want to make the surprise an embarrassment.
 
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TheStu

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Thank youuuu....Really detailed information. Gonna ask what he would like. I don't want to make the surprise an embarrassment.
The $329 iPad is really a great value especially considering how expensive Apple has made the iPads Pro. Yes, they have nicer screens, faster CPUs, more RAM, quad speakers, etc. ... BUT, all of that is a hard sell unless you really NEED all those things.
 

amyklai

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I have a iPad 10.5 and a Brydge 10.5 keyboard for it. I also have a Surface Pro, so I think I can make a good comparison.

For the "laptopish" things I use the iPad for (mainly note taking stuff where being able to use apps is a plus), Performance is not very important, the 10.5 is already plenty fast.

What IS missing are three things:
- a decent file system
- a trackpad and a mouse pointer
- lots of typical desktop software (good text editors like VS Code, IDEs etc).

Until those things are resolved, it will always a step behind something like the Surface Pro.
Even if it was times faster, three times lighter and had three times thinner bezels, those things have to be resolved before it can become a true first-class productivity tool for me instead of a "second device".

And that's exactly where I think the new iPad Pro is actually moving towards a worse position than where it was before:

- it's become quite a bit more expensive, which means it's beyond the "additional second device" category price-wise (at least for me)
- it doesn't meet the requirements to become my main device (at least not in the foreseeable future). And I doubt that Apple will ever give them everything that's needed to supplant MacBooks as primary devices, because they usually don't want to cannibalize sales of more expensive products.

So, even though I'm a big iPad fan, as far as I'm concerned, the new Pros are moving towards nowhere land. Devices that can still only play second fiddle but are getting way too expensive for that.
 

Zaap

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Thank youuuu....Really detailed information. Gonna ask what he would like. I don't want to make the surprise an embarrassment.
I can't imagine there's any artist who would object to being gifted an iPad (certainly any of the Pro models that can use the Pencil 1 or 2) so doubt you've got anything to worry about. :D

TheStu's advice is dead-on: it's hard to beat the older iPad Pro (which can use the first gen Pencil) at less than half the price of the new model. These remain fantastic tools for artists. And if it suits his needs just as well, why not?

I have a iPad 10.5 and a Brydge 10.5 keyboard for it. I also have a Surface Pro, so I think I can make a good comparison.

For the "laptopish" things I use the iPad for (mainly note taking stuff where being able to use apps is a plus), Performance is not very important, the 10.5 is already plenty fast.

What IS missing are three things:
- a decent file system
- a trackpad and a mouse pointer
- lots of typical desktop software (good text editors like VS Code, IDEs etc).

Until those things are resolved, it will always a step behind something like the Surface Pro.
Even if it was times faster, three times lighter and had three times thinner bezels, those things have to be resolved before it can become a true first-class productivity tool for me instead of a "second device".

And that's exactly where I think the new iPad Pro is actually moving towards a worse position than where it was before:

- it's become quite a bit more expensive, which means it's beyond the "additional second device" category price-wise (at least for me)
- it doesn't meet the requirements to become my main device (at least not in the foreseeable future). And I doubt that Apple will ever give them everything that's needed to supplant MacBooks as primary devices, because they usually don't want to cannibalize sales of more expensive products.

So, even though I'm a big iPad fan, as far as I'm concerned, the new Pros are moving towards nowhere land. Devices that can still only play second fiddle but are getting way too expensive for that.
This is exactly the take I was stumbling around starting this thread. I think you're dead on; Apple seems to be moving away from this being just a consumer device, and more toward a Prosumer device, which is a more limited audience for certain.

I'm leaning toward thinking that's mostly a good thing, as Apple initially was known for making tools for creative prosumer types and I've wished they'd get back to that. Other companies manage a much much larger range of products from prosumer down to consumer devices. While I don't think Apple should have crazy amounts of different devices, I feel there's more than enough room to expand and make more prosumer level stuff without sacrificing much.

Of course I agree with you that lacking file system and desktop-capable software are severe limitations of the current iPads.

I guess it's a matter of can they make the math work. I've no doubt many creative pros will have no problem justifying the price, if they can use it for professional work. (I can't justify it for myself just yet). But is that enough market to be sustainable? I guess time will tell.

I'm thinking this may be the start of Apple's ultimate goal of ditching x86 in Macs and converging with their iDevices. This demonstrates the real potential of their chips and makes that eventuality seem a bit more real.
 

killster1

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The iPad mini is outdated and does not support the Pencil. The iPad Air is ALSO outdated (it's 3 generations old at this point. It was superseded by the Air 2, the 2017 iPad and now the 2018 iPad) and ALSO doesn't support the Pencil.

I'd recommend that you start with the current entry level 9.7" iPad. It's really fast, supports the Pencil (first gen), AND starts at $329 which is a great price.

No pencil included (maybe 100$ More? )
Im definitely going to get one now but.. yes 329 to start 32gb wifi only version, but 128gb lte is 559$ but free engraving! i will check for some used ones 32gb lte i guess later i would love to upgrade the mini 4 i have and love. (it does drive me crazy but i have yet to find anything on android even close to the guided mode of apple *$(()*&%^.

funny check out this news article.. "
2018 iPad Pro owners are discovering the tablet bends easily under use (or worse, it comes out of the box that way), but according to Apple, it is a normal side effect caused by the way the device is manufactured. Apple's VP of hardware engineering says the tablet, which costs up to $1,899, "meets or exceeds" all of Apple's quality and precision standards.

Relative to the issue you referenced regarding the new iPad Pro, its unibody design meets or exceeds all of Apple's high-quality standards of design and precision manufacturing. We've carefully engineered it and every part of the manufacturing process is precisely measured and controlled. Our current specification for iPad Pro flatness is up to 400 microns which is even tighter than previous generations. "

just what i said its a design flaw and bends to easy on dec 7. now its in the news, wonder if the cases have a support shank in it
 
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Zaap

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No way in hell I'd accept a bend on a $1200 item that's obviously supposed to lay flat on a surface so you can actually use it. Apple is being Apple again. Apparently units are shipping like that right out of the box- that's a serious problem. They're going to have to address this properly. Sounds to me like they are trying to avoid an embarrassing recall like Samsung had to suffer though, but if they just sweep it under the rug it'll be much worse.
 

Mopetar

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Anyone around who's gotten one of these? I've still got an iPad Air 2 that works fine, but I've been considering an upgrade sometime in the future. I'd be interested in hearing the impressions of anyone who made a similar jump.