The brits are in for a rough ride

Page 36 - Seeking answers? Join the AnandTech community: where nearly half-a-million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.

WelshBloke

Lifer
Jan 12, 2005
31,059
8,769
136
I saw a post in regards to the proportional voting and how it would have turned out (I think it was from AJE)



Under proportional representation,

"Reform UK would have won 14 percent of seats in the House of Commons getting 14 percent of votes, a significant number – 91.
If the PR system were in place, the Conservatives would have won 156 seats, and the Labour Party would have won 221 seats (crucially, not an outright majority).
The Greens would have won 45 or 46 seats; the Liberal Democrats, 78 seats; Plaid Cymru, six or seven seats; and the SNP 13 seats.
But, and I realise that I've already said this, our elections aren't for a national leader, they are foe regional leaders.
 
  • Like
Reactions: KMFJD

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
13,328
8,244
136
If you start putting candidates from a party that didn't win in a constituency then that absolutely is going to make people's votes in that constituency irrelevant!

It doesn't make constituency votes irrelevant, it actually ensures they aren't wasted. But I don't really care enough to 'argue' about it. The very fact it has to be explained with links to wikipedia I guess means it fails @fskimospy's "simplicty" criteria.

I was referring to this sort of thing (which is similar to how London assembly members are elected). I think there are various forms - you can either have a separate 'party' vote, or the votes for individual candidates are also counted as party votes for the proportional part.

 

itsmydamnation

Platinum Member
Feb 6, 2011
2,882
3,442
136
I think a First past the post preferential voting system is far better, in effect the "bellow the line voting" system in Australia. i don't like "Group voting tickets".

In Australia you don't have to number every candidate its the first 6.

it works well when you have several parties that attract similar voters they dont end up splitting the vote.
 

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
13,328
8,244
136
Good Lord, Brian May is now PM (according to yahoo news anyway). Good news for the badgers, I guess. Will Bohemian Rhapsody be the new National Anthem?


Queen guitarist May was among the famous faces congratulating Sir Keir on a “well-earned victory” after an audience with the King confirmed him as the new prime minister.
 

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
13,328
8,244
136
Oooh, this bodes well for the Conservative Party

The Conservative party is no longer a 'viable entity', ex-Tory MP says​

Former Conservative MP Marcus Fysh has said the Conservative party is no longer a “viable entity” as Tory MPs are unwilling (or not inclined ideologically) to do what is needed to become electable again.

Fysh was Yeovil’s MP since 2015 but lost heavily to Adam Dance from the Liberal Democrats last week in the general election. He argues that the Conservatives need to occupy the centre-right in British politics to have broad electoral appeal, but says the current crop of MPs want to be on the centre-left.

So at least this ex-MP has concluded that the problem for the Tories was that they were just too left-wing.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dank69

mikeymikec

Lifer
May 19, 2011
18,093
10,326
136
  • Like
Reactions: misuspita

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
13,328
8,244
136
I'm apprehensive that we are just a bit behind in the electoral cycle compared to the US (and everywhere else). That is, that Starmer's coming term might turn out as Biden's administration is looking like being - a brief interval before the populist right return to power, madder than ever.

I really don't know, but the far-right seem to be close to gaining power in so many countries now.
 

IronWing

No Lifer
Jul 20, 2001
69,632
27,988
136
I'm apprehensive that we are just a bit behind in the electoral cycle compared to the US (and everywhere else). That is, that Starmer's coming term might turn out as Biden's administration is looking like being - a brief interval before the populist right return to power, madder than ever.

I really don't know, but the far-right seem to be close to gaining power in so many countries now.
The communists come and go but the fascists are always with us.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Vic and hal2kilo

cytg111

Lifer
Mar 17, 2008
23,615
13,149
136
So when we say that the Brits are in for a rough time, what do we mean by "time" as in "frame" ... Is the definition open for being open-ended?

Holy smokes.
Only one solution. You need more Nigel Farage.

 

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
13,328
8,244
136
Apparently, according to a long-running study by academics called "the party members project", about half of Tory Party members want the party to merge with Reform.

The Tories are basically about 50% a far-right party already (which, I suppose, makes them about 49% less far-right than the Republicans)

As for a potential merger between the Conservatives and Reform, the membership is split down the middle, with 47% in favour and 48% against, with the remainder unsure. Perhaps predictably Leavers are more than twice as likely to support a merger than Remainers (59 vs 25). Support for the idea also increases as one moves up the age ranges, with support for a merger stronger among the over-50s and opposition stronger among the under-50s. Support for a merger is also stronger among ‘working class’ Tories (the C2DEs) than their ‘middle class’ (ABC1) counterparts, as well as among those who backed Truss over Sunak in 2022 (59 vs 27).