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tennis racket question

mchammer187

Diamond Member
Nov 26, 2000
9,116
0
76
is there much variance between tennis rackets at the $40-70 range

I am going to be picking one up

I have never played before but I am taking a class for fun and dont want to be left with crap

but if crap is all i can get for that price than I guess I'll have to stick with it

any recommendations would be welcome
 

MikeMike

Lifer
Feb 6, 2000
45,885
66
91
spend 40$, how old are you? if you like it, then get a nicer racket, in that range, i doubt there is much difference in rackets.

MIKE
 

PunDogg

Diamond Member
Jan 15, 2002
4,529
1
0
well if you are just starting out and are playing for fun, i would go with a 70 dollar racket, if you got the money, cuz anything below 50 is just plastic, and those can hurt your hands, elbows and arms. Also depending on your style, which you will figure out later, you can stiff or flexiable rackets i prefer the stiff ones, better net play. But to answery our question yes there is a differance between and 40 and 70 dollar rackets. I would also go with a Head, prince, or wilson, in that order.

Dogg
 

MikeMike

Lifer
Feb 6, 2000
45,885
66
91
i currently am getting head.

head rackets, i have one on order nice racket, liquidmetal radical. 4 1/2" grip.

when you start getting into more expensive rackets, you have a LOT of options, and each racket is different. but spend 50$ or so then, and later on if you enjoy plaing, get a better nice racket.

MIKE
 

gistech1978

Diamond Member
Aug 30, 2002
5,047
0
0
for that price, more than likely youre gonna get crap.
but, if youre just starting out; you wont need a 250-350 dollar racket.

i havent priced rackets in 10 years.
when i started playing 12 years ago, i played with ~70 dollar Head(tm) racket.
i liked it, it also took a while to grow out of it before i got a better one.


 

blackdogdeek

Lifer
Mar 14, 2003
14,454
9
81
Originally posted by: nourdmrolNMT1
i currently am getting head.
lol.

sorry.

how about buying a used racket and getting it restrung or tightened? that might be a cheaper more viable option before spending $70 on a new racket.
 

gistech1978

Diamond Member
Aug 30, 2002
5,047
0
0
Originally posted by: blackdogdeek
Originally posted by: nourdmrolNMT1
i currently am getting head.
lol.

sorry.

how about buying a used racket and getting it restrung or tightened? that might be a cheaper more viable option before spending $70 on a new racket.
that brings up a good point.
if its something you like to do, get new strings put on that racket ASAP.
believe me, quality strings > the 'stock' strings.
i remember i broke a string on that Head racket, got it restrung and it was almost a totally different racket.
man its been so long since ive had one restrung, i cant even remember the good brands of string now or what i used to get.

i think it was a Prince brand of strings, looking at sites, it was probably Prince ProBlend. i would break thinner strings left and right.
 

bigalt

Golden Member
Oct 12, 2000
1,525
0
0
if you're really just starting, i really doubt you'd be able to tell the difference between a 30 dollar racquet and a 300 dollar racquet.

buy a piece of crap (or borrow racquets from the teacher if you can). if you find that your arm hurts from vibrations, or that you don't get enough power from a comfortable swing, that gives you some guidelines should you eventually want to get a better one.
 

mugs

Lifer
Apr 29, 2003
48,900
14
81
Borrow a racquet from a friend. My first racquet was a $40 Prince, on sale from $60 (10 years ago). After one season, it had a very lumpy shape. My Wilson Hammer has treated me well since then.
 

pcmodem

Golden Member
Feb 6, 2001
1,190
0
0
Yo,
Make sure you buy one that PROPERLY fits your hand size.

Choose GOOD quality string for your racket if it is not pre-strung. String quality makes a large difference in accuracy and control. Don't get it strung overly-tight for tension or you will not have adequate control.

Don't use those "pressureless" tennis balls that supposedly can be used indefinitely. They are extra heavy and the extra force at impact can lead to elbow problems.



Have fun,
PCM
 

abc

Diamond Member
Nov 26, 1999
3,116
0
0
if after you practice enough that you develop technique in your strokes and footwork, and can hit with some topspin instead of hitting flat shots, then start considering a better racquet....

you really won't feel a difference from 40 to 70 but you may feel a difference if you bump up to 150bucks.
 

neonerd

Diamond Member
Apr 24, 2003
8,746
1
0
yes, but i don't look at price, i look at the racket, how it feels in your hand, and some other factors. Also, try to find a racket with a large sweetspot, light, and comfortable.
 

TitanDiddly

Guest
Dec 8, 2003
12,696
1
0
Get a demo raquet from a local sports authority, sometimes you can get a real good deal on raquets that have been used a few times by prospective buyers. You should be able to find a good solid demo raquet in the $40-$70 range. You may or may not need to have the strings replaced soon after you get it, but you'll have to do that evantually anyways.
 

aceO07

Diamond Member
Nov 6, 2000
4,491
0
76
You will be able to tell the difference between rackets eventually. If you're starting out, go to a store and try holding them and swinging them, and see if you like it. If possible, bring along a tennis buddy so he can give you some advice.

I started out with a $30 Prince racket 3-4 years ago. It was decent in its day. The cheap rackets today seem to be really light weight and have no power. I've upgraded to a Head I.Prestige racket last year for $130. It feels much much better. Less vibration, heavier and more control.
 

GtPrOjEcTX

Lifer
Jul 3, 2001
10,782
0
0
I'd suggest buying a piece of crap cheapo, but make sure it fits your hand. You'll be banging it on the ground tearing it up in no time. Then get your 2nd raquet if you like the game and spend a bit more money on it

btw, I played in high school, but really have lost touch with the game.
 

BullsOnParade

Golden Member
Apr 7, 2003
1,259
0
0
I'd say buy a used racket on ebay. I see a lot of good rackets that
i started playing with for decent prices. Check out the wilson pro staff 6.1,
yonex rd tour rackets especially as i'd reccomend those even to someone
who's learned to play well and is on a budget. also ask around to see
what people around here might have paid 150 for maybe 5-8 years ago
as those rackets will probably still be really good now.

~bulls
 

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