Tennessee... Share your Netflix login, go to jail.

Jun 27, 2005
19,251
1
61
http://www.tennessean.com/article/2...l-crime-TN?odyssey=tab|topnews|text|FRONTPAGE

State lawmakers in country music’s capital have passed a groundbreaking measure that would make it a crime to use a friend’s login — even with permission — to listen to songs or watch movies from services such as Netflix and Rhapsody.

The bill, which has been signed by Gov. Bill Haslam and takes effect July 1, was pushed by recording industry officials to try to stop the loss of billions of dollars to illegal music sharing. They hope other states will follow.

The legislation was aimed at hackers and thieves who sell passwords in bulk, but its sponsors acknowledge it could be employed against people who use a friend’s or relative’s subscription.

While those who share their subscriptions with a spouse or other family members under the same roof almost certainly have nothing to fear, blatant offenders — say, college students who give their logins to everyone on their dormitory floor — could get in trouble.

“What becomes not legal is if you send your username and password to all your friends so they can get free subscriptions,” said the bill’s House sponsor, Rep. Gerald McCormick.

Under the measure, download services that believe they are getting ripped off can go to law enforcement authorities and press charges.

The bill expands an existing law used to prosecute people who steal cable television or leave restaurants without paying for their meals. It adds “entertainment subscription service” to the list of services protected by the law.

Tennessee would become the first state to update its theft-of-cable laws for the 21st century and address the new trend toward Internet delivery of entertainment, according to the Recording Industry Association of America.

“I think it’s stupid,” college student Josh Merbitz said of the law. The 20-year-old music education major at Middle Tennessee State University said he watches Netflix movies online using the password of his friend’s father, with the father’s permission.

Stealing $500 or less of entertainment would be a misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail and a fine of $2,500. Theft with a higher price tag would be a felony, with heavier penalties.

Haslam backs idea

Haslam said earlier that he wasn’t familiar with the details of the legislation, but given the recording industry presence, he favors “anything we can do to cut back” on music piracy.

“I don’t know enough about that legislation, but if it’s combating that issue, I would be in favor of it,” Haslam said.

The recording industry loses money when users share accounts for music services instead of paying separately.

Mitch Glazier, executive vice president of public policy for the RIAA, said the bill is a necessary protective measure as digital technology evolves. The music industry has seen its domestic revenue plunge by more than half in 10 years, from $15 billion to $7 billion, he said.

Bill Ramsey, a Nashville lawyer who practices entertainment law and criminal defense, said that he doubts the law would be used to ban people in the same household from sharing subscriptions and that small-scale violations involving a few people would, in any case, be difficult to detect. But “when you start going north of 10 people, a prosecutor might look and say, ‘Hey, you knew it was stealing,’ ” Ramsey said.

Music industry officials said they usually catch people who steal and resell logins in large quantities because they advertise.

Among the measure’s critics is public defender David Doyle. He said an “entertainment subscription” could be interpreted to mean a magazine subscription or a health club membership.

Kelly Kruger, an aerospace major at MTSU, said she likes to watch Netflix movies online in her dorm by logging in with her mother’s account information. Kruger said she hands out the login information to friends.

Even with a law against it, “I think people will keep doing it, like illegal downloading,” Kruger said.

As cheap as a Netflix subscription is I don't know why you wouldn't have your own but this does seem a bit extreme.
 

dfuze

Lifer
Feb 15, 2006
11,953
0
71
Off the top of my head I'm not really sure how something like letting someone borrow a login is different than letting them borrow a physical CD or DVD, it can still only be used by one person at a time (1 login at a time).

Sounds more like the industry trying to assign all blame on piracy rather than acknowleging that a good portion may be due to putting out a poor product.
 

Anubis

No Lifer
Aug 31, 2001
78,716
417
126
tbqhwy.com
Off the top of my head I'm not really sure how something like letting someone borrow a login is different than letting them borrow a physical CD or DVD, it can still only be used by one person at a time (1 login at a time).

.

you can actually stream to 2 or 3 devices at the same time on 1 acnt
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
37,759
18,038
146
Haslam said earlier that he wasn’t familiar with the details of the legislation, but given the recording industry presence, he favors “anything we can do to cut back” on music piracy.

“I don’t know enough about that legislation, but if it’s combating that issue, I would be in favor of it,” Haslam said.

Great, so the guy readily admits he doesn't know what he's signing? He just signs because RIAA has a big presence there. Way to go TN, way to go.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
37,759
18,038
146
you can actually stream to 2 or 3 devices at the same time on 1 acnt

Can I watch movies instantly on more than one PC or Netflix-ready device?
A:
Some membership plans allow you to watch simultaneously on more than one personal computer or Netflix-ready device. If you are on the Watch Instantly Unlimited plan or the 1-disc-out-at-a-time plan, you may watch only one device at a time. If you are on the 2-discs-out-at-a-time plan, you may watch on up to two devices at a time. Members on the 3-disc plan can watch on up to three devices. The maximum is four devices -- available for members on the 4-or-greater-discs-out-at-a-time plan.

Your account can have up to six unique authorized devices activated (and associated with it) at any given time, including personal computers and Netflix-ready devices. For example, if you're on the 1-disc plan, you can have up to six devices associated with your account, but you can only watch one of them at a time. If you're on the 2-disc plan, you can have up to six devices activated but can only watch two of them at the same time.

This is from Netflix FAQ's...It's easier to cut and paste rather than try to explain myself.
 

Anubis

No Lifer
Aug 31, 2001
78,716
417
126
tbqhwy.com
Can I watch movies instantly on more than one PC or Netflix-ready device?
A:
Some membership plans allow you to watch simultaneously on more than one personal computer or Netflix-ready device. If you are on the Watch Instantly Unlimited plan or the 1-disc-out-at-a-time plan, you may watch only one device at a time. If you are on the 2-discs-out-at-a-time plan, you may watch on up to two devices at a time. Members on the 3-disc plan can watch on up to three devices. The maximum is four devices -- available for members on the 4-or-greater-discs-out-at-a-time plan.

Your account can have up to six unique authorized devices activated (and associated with it) at any given time, including personal computers and Netflix-ready devices. For example, if you're on the 1-disc plan, you can have up to six devices associated with your account, but you can only watch one of them at a time. If you're on the 2-disc plan, you can have up to six devices activated but can only watch two of them at the same time.

This is from Netflix FAQ's...It's easier to cut and paste rather than try to explain myself.

ahh didn't know it went up with the plans,
 

Crono

Lifer
Aug 8, 2001
23,720
1,501
136
Heard about this on NPR.

It's to crack down harder on people selling tons of (stolen) accounts and account access, not to go after people sharing with their immediate families or with a few friends.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
37,759
18,038
146
Heard about this on NPR.

It's to crack down harder on people selling tons of (stolen) accounts and account access, not to go after people sharing with their immediate families or with a few friends.

Only time will tell how the law is chosen to be enforced.
 

LookBehindYou

Platinum Member
Dec 23, 2010
2,412
1
81
Meh, I don't care about it. To me, yeah, you shouldnt be giving out your account info. That means you are going around the system and sharing the account, its prolly against the TOS. Would I do it if i wanted to, yeah. I do the same thing with a giganews account, sure its not allowed, but oh well. This is one of those things that I could care less if someone is knowingly doing something wrong, I do stuff I know I shouldnt all the time. But that doesnt mean I can complain when someone makes a law against it.

People have to protect their interests, and I'm ok with that. That doesnt mean I wouldnt share an account. I just don't have the right to complain about a law or TOS that say I can't.
 
Mar 11, 2004
23,063
5,533
146
Great, so the guy readily admits he doesn't know what he's signing? He just signs because RIAA has a big presence there. Way to go TN, way to go.

No shit, WTF? I'd be pissed just over that fact alone, regardless of what the law they're signing is.

Heard about this on NPR.

It's to crack down harder on people selling tons of (stolen) accounts and account access, not to go after people sharing with their immediate families or with a few friends.

Then they should not have written it so broadly.

This is going to be abused to hell. How long before they start requiring tech that can track the number of people that can experience their media? They already tried to make a fuss about multiple people being able to listen to music over a single radio.

I am however honestly surprised at the people in that article. Are people really sharing Netflix subscriptions so much? Its less than $10, even broke ass college kids can afford that. Why the hell are these people giving out their login info to seemingly anyone who asks? That's just stupid on its own.

I find those people so baffling that I almost wonder if they aren't made up to try and make the RIAA/MPAA stance seem less ridiculous.
 

DominionSeraph

Diamond Member
Jul 22, 2009
8,391
31
91
Off the top of my head I'm not really sure how something like letting someone borrow a login is different than letting them borrow a physical CD or DVD,

you can actually stream to 2 or 3 devices at the same time on 1 acnt

That. Also the variety available makes it different, as it is non-personalized. While I may only have 2 or 3 movies that would interest you, giving you Netflix would give you access to movies/shows that I would never buy myself. So it's giving you access to a huge library that is not mine.
 

PokerGuy

Lifer
Jul 2, 2005
13,650
201
101
Heard about this on NPR.

It's to crack down harder on people selling tons of (stolen) accounts and account access, not to go after people sharing with their immediate families or with a few friends.

If that's the case then the law should specify it. These things always end up in some travesty of someone getting screwed because while the intent may have been to only "go after people selling tons of accounts", the law says they can go after anyone sharing the account info. As broadly as that law is written, if a prosecutor got a burr up his butt he could technically charge you for sharing your magazine subscription with someone else if you let them read a magazine you subscribe to.

Stupid politicians are stupid. News at 11.
 

rudder

Lifer
Nov 9, 2000
19,441
85
91
Great, so the guy readily admits he doesn't know what he's signing? He just signs because RIAA has a big presence there. Way to go TN, way to go.

In Haslam's defense... he was much better than the alternative.. which does not say much. This came about because of the RIAA lobbyists. The RIAA doesn;t understand that people that are pirating crap and not buying DVD's are not using netflix either. They download through torrents or whatever and get the files without the DRM. Silly legislation and a waster of taxpayer money.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
37,759
18,038
146
In Haslam's defense... he was much better than the alternative.. which does not say much. This came about because of the RIAA lobbyists. The RIAA doesn;t understand that people that are pirating crap and not buying DVD's are not using netflix either. They download through torrents or whatever and get the files without the DRM. Silly legislation and a waster of taxpayer money.

He's not defending you.
 

vi edit

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 28, 1999
62,387
8,150
126
Yeh no sympathy. If you can afford the internet connection and the PC/device to play it then you can pony up the $8 a month you cheap bastards.
 

PokerGuy

Lifer
Jul 2, 2005
13,650
201
101
Yeh no sympathy. If you can afford the internet connection and the PC/device to play it then you can pony up the $8 a month you cheap bastards.

I agree, but the law, as it is written, is such that if I use my wife's username and password at home to watch netflix, I could be prosecuted and convicted of a crime. Is it likely? No, but the law is poorly written, it doesn't actually solve any problem and introduces a host of possible issues. Legislative fail.
 

waggy

No Lifer
Dec 14, 2000
68,145
10
81
i disagree with the law.

but damn netflix is cheap for what you get. $14 a month for 3 cd's and unlimited downloads
 

paperfist

Diamond Member
Nov 30, 2000
6,517
280
126
www.the-teh.com
Great, so the guy readily admits he doesn't know what he's signing? He just signs because RIAA has a big presence there. Way to go TN, way to go.

Wow they need to pass a law that says if you're too lazy to represent the people who elected you and can't be bothered reading what your passing you should be stripped of all your benefits and barred from serving the public permanently.

Does this guy have a FB page? I don't even have an account but I'd borrow a friends just to rag on him.
 

vi edit

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 28, 1999
62,387
8,150
126
I agree, but the law, as it is written, is such that if I use my wife's username and password at home to watch netflix, I could be prosecuted and convicted of a crime. Is it likely? No, but the law is poorly written, it doesn't actually solve any problem and introduces a host of possible issues. Legislative fail.

Eh, the article clearly says this:

While those who share their subscriptions with a spouse or other family members under the same roof almost certainly have nothing to fear, blatant offenders — say, college students who give their logins to everyone on their dormitory floor — could get in trouble.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
37,759
18,038
146
Eh, the article clearly says this:

While those who share their subscriptions with a spouse or other family members under the same roof almost certainly have nothing to fear, blatant offenders — say, college students who give their logins to everyone on their dormitory floor — could get in trouble.

"almost certainly" isn't the same as don't. It means, right now that's not the intent. Let's see how long it lasts before your family member is no-knocked for using your login. Although it "almost certainly" won't happen, it could.

that's an extreme example, but hte wording leaves it as a possibility.
 

SonnyDaze

Diamond Member
Jul 31, 2004
6,867
3
76
$8 a month for Netflix = A six pack of beer.

College kids can't figure this out? WTF?