• Guest, The rules for the P & N subforum have been updated to prohibit "ad hominem" or personal attacks against other posters. See the full details in the post "Politics and News Rules & Guidelines."

Techpowerup's Memtest 64, is it better than HCI Memtest for determining stability?

leito360

Junior Member
Apr 5, 2014
7
0
66
Hello, I have some Crucial Ballistix Sport 4x8GB @ 1600 CL9 1.5v. I have been reading that some people pushed them to 2400 C11 1.6v, so right know I'm doing baby steps and I set them to 1866 C10 1.5v, I want to test its stability and I found this two programs. Anandtech says that HCI's is the way to go to test stability in a memory, but some months ago Techpowerup released Memtest 64.
Has this app been thoroughly tested? Is it as good as HCI's?
The thing is that with HCI's I have to open a lot of instances to fill the ~30GB of RAM, I think that with memtest64 I can fill the memory with just a couple of them (Not sure, though).
Also, what's the gold standard for it? 200-500%? 10hrs?

Thanks
 

The Stilt

Golden Member
Dec 5, 2015
1,709
3,055
106
Based on my limited experience on it, it's significantly worse.

HCI is excellent in finding errors, however it's totally outdated and therefore extremely slow.
It's single threaded and 32-bit only, meaning you have to run multiple instances to test larger amounts of memory / for speed.

Instead I highly recommend an app called "Ram Test".
It's fully multithreaded (OpenMP), 64-bit and contains AVX/AVX2 optimizations. For example on my 7960X the performance is 16.69x better (single threaded) than on the newest HCI 6.0 version.

The app isn't free, however in my opinion it is totally worth the cost.

https://www.karhusoftware.com/ramtest/
 
Last edited:

leito360

Junior Member
Apr 5, 2014
7
0
66
Based on my limited experience on it, it's significantly worse.

HCI is excellent in finding errors, however it's totally outdated and therefore extremely slow.
It's single threaded and 32-bit only, meaning you have to run multiple instances to test larger amounts of memory / for speed.

Instead I highly recommend an app called "Ram Test".
It's fully multithreaded (OpenMP), 64-bit and contains AVX/AVX2 optimizations. For example on my 7960X the performance 16.69x better (single threaded) than on the newest HCI 6.0 version.

The app isn't free, however in my opinion it is totally worth the cost.

https://www.karhusoftware.com/ramtest/
Thanks i'll give it a shot
 

Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
Super Moderator
Sep 13, 2008
3,954
300
126
IMO, memtest86 should be used, but it can take a while for systems with lots of RAM. You will want a small flash drive to boot it from. I would recommend 4 passes at least. Contains both UEFI and legacy version. https://www.memtest86.com/
 

UncleCrusty

Junior Member
Jul 25, 2016
22
6
51
IMO, memtest86 should be used, but it can take a while for systems with lots of RAM. You will want a small flash drive to boot it from. I would recommend 4 passes at least. Contains both UEFI and legacy version. https://www.memtest86.com/
In my limited RAM overclocking experience, I've found tons of errors with HCI while memtest86 was coming up clean. Might as well use multiple tests just to be safe.
 

Elixer

Lifer
May 7, 2002
10,378
763
126
I only use memory testing software that is outside of the OS, since the OS itself takes up a pretty big chunk of RAM itself.

Therefore, I tend to use memtest86+ and the like, since they have a small footprint and are self contained.
 

Mustanaamio

Junior Member
Jan 4, 2018
1
1
16
Hello, I have some Crucial Ballistix Sport 4x8GB @ 1600 CL9 1.5v. I have been reading that some people pushed them to 2400 C11 1.6v, so right know I'm doing baby steps and I set them to 1866 C10 1.5v, I want to test its stability and I found this two programs. Anandtech says that HCI's is the way to go to test stability in a memory, but some months ago Techpowerup released Memtest 64.
Has this app been thoroughly tested? Is it as good as HCI's?
The thing is that with HCI's I have to open a lot of instances to fill the ~30GB of RAM, I think that with memtest64 I can fill the memory with just a couple of them (Not sure, though).
Also, what's the gold standard for it? 200-500%? 10hrs?

Thanks
IMO, memtest86 should be used, but it can take a while for systems with lots of RAM. You will want a small flash drive to boot it from. I would recommend 4 passes at least. Contains both UEFI and legacy version. https://www.memtest86.com/
MemTest86 and MemTest64 (which seems to be just a 64-bit Windows port of MemTest86) are almost completely useless for testing overclock stability. They are mostly based on predetermined bit patterns that come nowhere near to simulating a real world scenario of memory usage.

I only use memory testing software that is outside of the OS, since the OS itself takes up a pretty big chunk of RAM itself.

Therefore, I tend to use memtest86+ and the like, since they have a small footprint and are self contained.
Running the test on top of an operating system is actually beneficial as the operating system with its background processes acts as a kind of a memory test in itself and greatly helps with finding overclock instability related memory errors.
 
  • Like
Reactions: laamanaator

The Stilt

Golden Member
Dec 5, 2015
1,709
3,055
106
I only use memory testing software that is outside of the OS, since the OS itself takes up a pretty big chunk of RAM itself.

Therefore, I tend to use memtest86+ and the like, since they have a small footprint and are self contained.
Having the ability to test all of the available DRAM is obviously ideal, but nowdays when people have >= 16GB of memory available this is seldom an actual issue.
Back in the DDR/DDR2 ERA when the systems had 512-2048MB DRAM available, Memtest86 was basically the only option as the OS alone would consume a significant portion of the total available DRAM.

As the DRAM capacities increased and made "in OS" testing possible with HCI Memtest, the results between the two testing methods were rather drastically different.
Most of the DRAM overclocks previously deemed "stable" with Memtest86 were producing plenty of errors in HCI, even after a short run. There was also a phenomenon which proved that HCI was pushing the DRAM much harder than Memtest86 ever did: the temperature of the DRAM modules, which at the time was an actual issue.

HCI Memtest revolutionized the DRAM testing back in early 2000s it was introduced.
Even today there is nothing really wrong with it, when it comes to finding the memory related errors.
The only actual fault it has is the fact that it has fallen completely behind the development: it is still a 32-bit application (supporting up to ~3.5GB of DRAM per instance), it is single threaded and totally unoptimized (X87 code).

The "Ram Test" application I mentioned before fixes all of those faults, while matching or excelling in capability of finding the memory errors.

I'd also like to mention that I "know" the author of "Ram Test" and that I had a role in it's conception.
In 2017 I had to run memory tests basically daily basis (Ryzen). While the HCI being the only tool available, that almost a daily task was extremely time consuming and tedious due to the fact that HCI Memtest was so slow even when multiple instances were run simultaneously.
When the first versions of "Ram Test" became available, it was really a god sent despite the fact that the performance wasn't even at the same levels as it is today.

So biased or not, I still definitely highly recommend "Ram Test" to everyone. That's what I personally use now and so far it has never failed me.
Besides, it costs only 12$ (of which I receive none) to check it out yourself, so it's not like we're talking about a major investment here.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS