Space heater vs Ceramic Heater

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by JEDI, Nov 23, 2011.

  1. imot

    imot Junior Member

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    also coil heaters are technically really similar to light bulbs so the idea is definitely viable.
     
  2. ShawnD1

    ShawnD1 Lifer

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    The safest electric heat I know of is called a "baseboard heater."
    [​IMG]
    I have one in my room. It has a thermostat so it switches on and off as needed. It also has tip over protection. The heating elements themselves do not get hot because it's a fairly large heating element and it zig zags across the entire length of the device, and it's about 3 feet wide. I can put my hand on top of it while it's running and hold it there for several seconds before it gets uncomfortable. It has no active cooling like fans or pumps, so there's nothing that will fail and cause the house to burn down. It's also very silent. It makes a bit of a humming noise similar to a light bulb.
    The down side is that this type of heater is designed to heat the room. It's not directional. I can't put a chair in front of it and bask in its heaty goodness, which is something a cheap $15 fan heater does well. My baseboard heater was something like $80, so it's easily the most expensive type. My awesome Costco parabolic radiant heater was more like $60. Regular ass 1500W ceramic heaters are only $15.

    I also have an infrared parabolic heater in my living room.
    [​IMG]
    That thing is awesome. It's all about focused heating. Great for warming up 1 person. Be careful not to buy a shitty one though. A good radiant heater runs COOL. It should not produce visible light. Anything that uses vacuum or halogen tubes to contain the tungsten is a pile of shit because that means it's too hot and will generate a bunch of light. My radiant heater has exposed elements, it glows red hot, but it doesn't really make any light. My parents have one that uses an 800W halogen light which sucks because it's hot enough to emit a ridiculous amount of visible light. Why would anyone want that? That's like having a spot light blast your eyes. Retarded.
     
    #27 ShawnD1, Nov 30, 2011
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2011
  3. qliveur

    qliveur Diamond Member

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    Another vote for oil-filled radiator.
     
  4. Jeff7

    Jeff7 Lifer

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    Yup.
    Pass electricity through resistance, and you get heat.
    Heat generated = Current² * Resistance
    Watts = Amps² * Ohms

    A hair dryer of course is intended to put out a high-speed stream of air, with a lot of noise along with it. It's also likely that they're not built for continuous-use applications. ;)
     
  5. ShawnD1

    ShawnD1 Lifer

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    Pretty much everything is >99% efficient at generating heat. My computer is making heat, the monitor makes heat. Server rooms have huge hvac systems to deal with all the heat. It's nice because it means any electrical device can be used to heat a room. It also means the only difference between different heaters is their other features like thermostat controls, fan speeds, timers, etc.

    A toaster oven would make a good room heater. It's small, it's fairly high energy, it's built to run continuously with temperatures exceeding 450F, and it requires no active cooling. Start it with a 5 minute timer and the room will get nice and toasty :awe:
     
  6. Red Squirrel

    Red Squirrel Lifer

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    Put a sterling engine in your heater to produce more electricity to produce more heat then add another sterling engine and keep going.

    Unlimited heat. :D
     
  7. ShawnD1

    ShawnD1 Lifer

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    CO poisoning?

    Actually, you could run the exhaust from a car through a heat exchange in the house. Its like a gas furnace :-D
     
  8. DrPizza

    DrPizza Administrator Elite Member Goat Whisperer
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    Yep. I've used a blow dryer and a heat gun to heat a room in my basement when it got reallllllllly cold outside and I had a water line freeze.
     
  9. lxskllr

    lxskllr Lifer

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    aka VW heat :^D
     
  10. IcePickFreak

    IcePickFreak Platinum Member

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    The world has been saved! :awe:
     
  11. Gooberlx2

    Gooberlx2 Lifer

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    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/02/09/earlyshow/contributors/dannylipford/main672592.shtml

    It's more about safety and, to a lesser degree, efficiency vs heat output.
     
  12. Jeff7

    Jeff7 Lifer

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    The only downside then is if you've got an available heat source that's cheaper per-watt/hr than electricity.



    Safety, and the concentration and delivery of the heat.
    Efficiency, again, is going to be as near to 100% as you can get.
    1500W in, and you're going to get damn close to 1500W out. (Where else would the energy go, anyway? Minute rearrangements of a few atoms in the crystal structure of the metal in the wires?)

    Concentration: Tiny, fast fan vs a large slow one.

    Delivery: Radiation, natural convection, or forced convection.
     
    #37 Jeff7, Nov 30, 2011
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2011
  13. lxskllr

    lxskllr Lifer

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  14. Jeff7

    Jeff7 Lifer

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    Maybe it also replicates bacon - and cooks it.
     
  15. brandonb

    brandonb Diamond Member

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    I have an infrared heater. Unlike most heaters which are sort of like a toaster, infrared generate infrared rays which heat the room like the sun vs burning the air... That means you don't lose any humidity in the air, which is common in winter because most heating systems are burning the air and result in dry skin, etc.

    (Thats what it said on the box, can't say if it was the truth or not)
     
  16. ShawnD1

    ShawnD1 Lifer

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    Actually, burning the air would make it MORE humid. Hot air can hold more water than cold air.
     
  17. imot

    imot Junior Member

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    What do you think about the EdenPURE? Do you believe in its air purification feature? That heater is a way more expensive than the other ones and I don't get why since it is just a 1,500 Watts infrared heater with some air filter attached.
    They call it air purification tho they say in both EdenPURE review on the Electric Heaters Review site that they don't believe in effectiveness of the air filter in it and recommend buying a cheaper space heater, but don't mention why and any other details about it just only that it removes some bacteria from the air.
     
  18. slpaulson

    slpaulson Diamond Member

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    Hot air can hold more water, but when you heat cold air the relative humidity, the ratio of water in the air over the amount of water the air can hold, goes down.

    Relative humidity is what affects dry skin. That's why the inside of your house is very dry in winter. You're heating up cold air. The amount of water in the air stays the same, but the amount of water the air can hold goes up, which makes any water evaporate more readily into the air.
     
    #43 slpaulson, Nov 30, 2011
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2011
  19. Triumph

    Triumph Lifer

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    Efficient? Yes. Near 100%? Impossible. Carnot efficiency rules, the ultimate efficiency of anything that does work is dependent upon the temperature of the heat source, and the heat sink. In this case, a 450 degree toaster and a 70 degree room, for example. Converting to Kelvins first, the equation is

    Efficiency = 1 - (21/232) = .909 or 91% efficiency.

    Purely academic, but true.
     
  20. Jeff7

    Jeff7 Lifer

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    Or maybe it doesn't feel as dry. Where would the moisture go? The only thing that would change is the relative humidity, as the air in the room gets warmer.
    Maybe that's what they were getting at.


    Infrared = radiant heat = primarily used to heat objects directly, versus heating the air and then heating objects via convection.

    Mental simulation says...
    The radiant heater will heat you up before heating up the air in the room, so you're more likely to turn off the heater sooner, so the air in the room won't get as warm, so the relative humidity won't get quite as low. Since you're more likely to turn off the heater sooner, you're introducing less energy into the room, thus resulting in a lesser increase in temperature, and therefore a lesser drop in relative humidity.

    But if you had a 1500W radiant heater and a 1500W convective heater and put either one into an insulated environment (a "system"), either one would be putting 1500W into the system, so the air temperature would change in the same manner, and the relative humidity would therefore also experience the same decrease.

    So your skin dries out, you buy more lotion, fapfapfap, life goes on.



    Where does the extra energy go then?
    V = IR and P = I²R

    If I've got a 3-ohm resistor, and I apply 6V across it, I'd darn well better get 2A of current flow.
    And if I've got 2A of current, I²R = 2² * 3, that should be 12W of heat generated there. My thinking then is that maybe some of that energy is going into increasing the temperature of the conductor? Is that then where that extra x.x% is going? Though even then, from a thermodynamic systems standpoint, it's still energy introduced into the system.
     
    #45 Jeff7, Nov 30, 2011
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2011
  21. Triumph

    Triumph Lifer

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    i fail at thermodynamics, i haven't used it in 10 years. carnot efficiency is for a heat engine that converts heat into work, or work into heat. a working fluid is required. i should open my books once in a while.
     
    #46 Triumph, Nov 30, 2011
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2011