Some questions about A8-7600 APU & such

DilyanD.

Member
Dec 2, 2016
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Hello! Hope you're having a great day/night!

I've got a few questions about my A8-7600.

Question 1: I've noticed that the maximum frequency it reaches is 3.66 GHz, while its specifications say the turbo is to 3.8 GHz. Is the cause of this the enabled iGPU (integrated graphics)? I'm planning on buying a dedicated GPU and I'd need more power from my CPU for today's games. Will it get unlocked and be able to reach 3.8 GHz once its iGPU is disabled? The iGPU takes some frequency I suppose?

Question 2: turning off the iGPU will take some load off the CPU, right? Will its performance increase as it's gonna have its full cache and possibly frequency?

Question 3: The GPU I'm thinking of buying is GTX 1050 Ti (yes, I know CPU is gonna bottleneck but I might upgrade it in future). I'm worried about drivers and stuff like this. Is it how I think it is?:

Uninstall the current AMD drivers for the APU with Driver Sweeper > shut down PC > put GPU in > turn on > install its drivers from Nvidia's website > enjoy my life.

The iGPU should disable as soon as there's a dedicated GPU, right? So I suppose I won't need the drivers anymore? Should I remove them or keep the AMD drivers even with the iGPU disabled?

Looking forward for some answers!

Have a nice day/night!
DilyanD.
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
28,520
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http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Bulldozer/AMD-A10-Series A8-7600.html

1. 3.66 sounds a bit odd as it's not one of the p-state speeds. It could be throttling with IGP use, though.
2. Turning off the IGP would stop any possible CPU throttling due to CPU and IGP combined loads.
3. I would not get a 1050Ti, I'd spend just a little more and get the RX470.

If you switch to NV, then yes, I'd clean out the video drivers.

Check your BIOS for the setting for the primary graphics adapter.
 
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DilyanD.

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Dec 2, 2016
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Thank you for your reply. I would love to have a more powerful card such as RX 470, but I ain't got much money, really. I actually started from 750 Ti, then found out RX 460, and then 1050 Ti that was much better for little more money. But RX 470 is really hard for me to get and it's a power eating monster. I'm afraid that my PSU will die.

It's 520W but you know there's some cheap ones. Its description says it's designed for powerful cards but who knows. Can you look at voltages n stuff and tell me if it's any good or no? Would it burn if I get the 1050 Ti? It's just 75W but goes up to ~140W on load.

https://www.dateks.lv/en/cenas/psu-barosanas-bloki/109215_intertech_booster_sps_520_520w_80mm_fan
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
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The CPU may be running a little low due to the integrated video being used, but even then it's not enough to matter. The GPU portion of the CPU is somewhat dedicated, and runs at its own frequency. So the main thing you are going to notice is more RAM available in Windows once you turn it off. You will probably also notice a cooler CPU without the GPU portion running.

And after installing your new card, you do want to turn it off in the BIOS, to make sure it releases the memory the BIOS allocated for the GPU itself. Tell us what motherboard you have if you need any further assistance with how to turn off the GPU.
 

DilyanD.

Member
Dec 2, 2016
36
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The CPU may be running a little low due to the integrated video being used, but even then it's not enough to matter. The GPU portion of the CPU is somewhat dedicated, and runs at its own frequency. So the main thing you are going to notice is more RAM available in Windows once you turn it off. You will probably also notice a cooler CPU without the GPU portion running.

And after installing your new card, you do want to turn it off in the BIOS, to make sure it releases the memory the BIOS allocated for the GPU itself. Tell us what motherboard you have if you need any further assistance with how to turn off the GPU.
Thanks for replying. I am pretty sure how to turn it off in BIOS, but isn't it going to disable itself? My MB is ASRock FM2A68M-HD+, which came with the PC itself, and the APU, without a graphics card. This reminds me to ask...is the mb compatible? It has a PCI 3.0 x16 slot, but the mb is pretty small. Processor's cooler is very close to the slot, as well as the RAM. I'll show you a pic later as I can't right now.
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
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Space looks fine as long as the card isn't too long (I don't know how much free space is beyond the board). The integrated video will stay on until you turn it off, as you can use them both for dual, triple display, etc.
 

DilyanD.

Member
Dec 2, 2016
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Well my case is ATX. This MSI one is for ATX, so should work.
http://desktop.bg/system/images/126030/normal/msi_geforce_gtx_1050_ti_gaming_x_4g.png?1479900081

This one's description says it's for Mini ITX but I think it can be put in a MB of ATX case as well.
http://desktop.bg/system/images/124283/normal/msi_geforce_gtx_1050_ti_4g_oc.png?1478534552

Also, what about my PSU?

Thank you for your reply. I would love to have a more powerful card such as RX 470, but I ain't got much money, really. I actually started from 750 Ti, then found out RX 460, and then 1050 Ti that was much better for little more money. But RX 470 is really hard for me to get and it's a power eating monster. I'm afraid that my PSU will die.

It's 520W but you know there's some cheap ones. Its description says it's designed for powerful cards but who knows. Can you look at voltages n stuff and tell me if it's any good or no? Would it burn if I get the 1050 Ti? It's just 75W but goes up to ~140W on load.

https://www.dateks.lv/en/cenas/psu-barosanas-bloki/109215_intertech_booster_sps_520_520w_80mm_fan
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
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If it's a full atx case, then you should be fine. The power supply doesn't have PCI--E power, so you would really be much better with a new power supply if you want an RX 470, as all RX 470s I have looked at require one. Most of the GTX 1050s I have looked at do not require such a connection, as they draw less power than equivalent AMD cards. So if you want to keep what you have, that would end up being the better card for you. If you are willing to upgrade to a power supply with a solid name (Corsair, Cooler Master, EVGA, etc), then you can go with either card.
 

DilyanD.

Member
Dec 2, 2016
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I don't really have money for anything else beside a GPU. I'm thinking of buying either:
https://www.msi.com/Graphics-card/GeForce-GTX-1050-Ti-4G-OC.html#hero-overview
OR
https://www.msi.com/Graphics-card/GeForce-GTX-1050-Ti-GAMING-X-4G.html#hero-overview

The GAMING X one requires a 6 pin power connector and is little more expensive, but has two fans, so I would be able to overclock it better and without worrying for damages. I'm not sure if my PSU has a 6 pin connector or something, and I'm worried that it's gonna burn if I connect it. Like...some people say cheap PSUs are sh*t n stuff. It's 520W as I said, which is far than enough, but I'm not sure whether I should buy the 1st one that has no power connectors, just plug & play, or the 2nd one. :X
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
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The page you linked says that there is no 6-pin pci-express power connector on that power supply. So unless the card comes with an adapter to standard ATX 4-pin, it ain't gonna work.
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
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P.S. Looks like plenty of room in that case.

Also, based on what I am hearing, you might want to save a bit longer before getting a good card. The last thing you want is the loss of a power supply when you just spent all your money because the card drew too much power.
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
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It says ithat has 520 watts. Some makers of cheap power supplies will overrated their units. I know power supplies come from all over, but I am familiar with most of the big ones (not necessarily all the OEMs) and this isn't one I have ever heard of.
 

DilyanD.

Member
Dec 2, 2016
36
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Well I don't really have more money for a new PSU right now. What's the chance if current one burns the rest of the components burn too? Is it possible? I think there's some defenses, no?
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
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Like I said, I have never heard of that brand, so I can'tell honestly tell you yes or no. All I can say is that it looks like a pretty old design (10+ years) so if it's something you bought recently, it may have been sitting on a shelf for a while.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
54,100
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What's the chance if current one burns the rest of the components burn too? Is it possible? I think there's some defenses, no?
Depends. Really cheap PSUs can and do "burn ouit", and can sometimes damage components when they do. If you really don't want to risk your current rig's parts, consider saving up for a better PSU.
 

DilyanD.

Member
Dec 2, 2016
36
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Well...thanks for all your replies. I appreciate all the help. All my questions have been answered.
As of the PSU...its description says it's capable of holding powerful videocards...and 1050 Ti is just 75W, doesn't even have a power connector, so uh...I suppose I'll trust it and go ahead and buy it. I can't really buy a new PSU.
 

DilyanD.

Member
Dec 2, 2016
36
1
11
Just a last question...when does the PSU burn if it's gonna burn? With time or first start up once GPU is plugged?
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
15,924
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Just a last question...when does the PSU burn if it's gonna burn? With time or first start up once GPU is plugged?
Cheap PSUs can go at anytime. Startup, load, or sitting at your desktop. It might last one day, or several years. They rarely have any type over-volt or circuitry protection built in to them, and they can take out other components when they go.
 

DilyanD.

Member
Dec 2, 2016
36
1
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Omg...now you scared me...congratulations. You made me not buy the GPU yet. It's last one in the shop I was gonna buy it from and might be sold soon, but hell no if I'm gonna lose my whole PC. What good PSU would you suggest me to buy?

CoolerMaster; Corsair; DeepCool; Fortron; Fractal Design; NZXT; RAIDMAX; Sea Sonic; Segotep; Zalman; be quiet!

Those are the available in the shop. I've heard of CoolerMaster, Corsair, DeepCool, Segotep and be quiet!
I think they're good, except Segotep, not sure for it. My case is Segotep, but idk about power supplies.
Also, how much watts should it be? My PC with the bought 1050 Ti would be...

MB: AsRock FM2A68M-HD+
CPU: A8-7600 (APU w/ disabled iGPU)
GPU: MSI GeForce GTX 1050 Ti 4G OC (the small one w/ one fan (mini ITX))
RAM: 2x4GB DDR3 1600MHz, no idea of the brand but it's not in cover, must be some cheap one.
HDD: 2TB, no idea of the brand.
No SSD.

Stock CPU fan cooler, 2 separate air fans.
I'd aim for like 500W? Since I might replace one stick of RAM w/ 8GB instead (so it becomes 12GB) and a new CPU probably.
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
15,924
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Omg...now you scared me...congratulations. You made me not buy the GPU yet.

CoolerMaster; Corsair; DeepCool; Fortron; Fractal Design; NZXT; RAIDMAX; Sea Sonic; Segotep; Zalman; be quiet!

Stock CPU fan cooler, 2 separate air fans.
I'd aim for like 500W? Since I might replace one stick of RAM w/ 8GB instead (so it becomes 12GB) and a new CPU probably.
It's not to scare you. It's to educate you and allow you to make an informed decision, and decide if the risk is worth it to you. A 500w - 550w would be plenty for your needs, and allow some headroom if you went with a better video card in the future (the 1050ti is really a weak gaming card compared to the other choices out there that aren't that much more expensive like the RX 470 or GTX 1060 3GB).

As far as those brands, out of that list, I believe only Seasonic and Fortron make their own PSUs. The rest of the brands use OEM companies to manufacturer them, and then they provide the warranty and service for it. And when I say they use an OEM to make them, that is not really a bad thing as long as the OEM is a good company who has high quality control and uses quality components. For example, all EVGA power supplies are manufactured by several different OEMs, and some are decent and some are great.

Since each model of PSU from those companies can be made from many different OEMs, it is best to get the model number and read some reviews on it. Sites like http://www.jonnyguru.com/ review PSUs. They test the power they put out, and open them up to show if it is a quality unit. There are other sites that review PSUs like Tom'sHardware, hardOCP, Anandtech, Bit Tech, and many others, although I like JonnyGurur's reviews the best.
 

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