(Some) Intel boxed coolers have FINALLY received some upgrades

taisingera

Golden Member
Dec 27, 2005
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That looks good with the black aluminum. I have a copper core cooler laying around here for 10 years. I bought it separately for about $8 to replace the one that came with the cpu.
 
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chrisjames61

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Dec 31, 2013
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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-revamps-boxed-coolers-for-comet-lake-processors-new-blacked-out-design

Nothing major, but a few changes in the right direction (including the copper core making a comeback). However, they upgraded version only seems to come with the 10th gen i7 and i9 (non-k) CPUs.



Those plastic push pins just scream cheap. I still would just take it to the local landfill for recycling. How can you cheap out so bad with fairly expensive cpu's?
 

killster1

Diamond Member
Mar 15, 2007
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Those plastic push pins just scream cheap. I still would just take it to the local landfill for recycling. How can you cheap out so bad with fairly expensive cpu's?
looks fine to me, i stopped caring as much about installing 100$ cooling solutions and just let it be, black fins and copper core, guess id have to check its performance before i said how terrible or great it is but it does look nice.
 

Stuka87

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Dec 10, 2010
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It seems short, I cannot see how this could properly cool an i7 or i9.
 

UsandThem

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May 4, 2000
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It seems short, I cannot see how this could properly cool an i7 or i9.
The locked ones are 65w, so adding the copper plug back into the coolers should be sufficient.

I think Intel learned that lesson with the i9-9900 (non K). which was an all aluminum cooler and affected the overall performance.
 
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piokos

Senior member
Nov 2, 2018
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Those plastic push pins just scream cheap.
That's because they are cheap.
I still would just take it to the local landfill for recycling. How can you cheap out so bad with fairly expensive cpu's?
Why would they?
Plastic push pins are perfectly suitable for the weight of that cooler.
It's a very common solution - even appearing in 500g tower coolers (e.g. Scythe Katana).

And it's a very good design overall - making coolers super easy to mount, with minimal risk.

The only sensible alternative would be 4 simple screws connecting the heatsink and motherboard.
It's even cheaper :), but also makes installation more complex and risky.
You usually only see this solution when there's a strict space limit - like when they enter from mobo's bottom side (e.g. Noctua L9i).
It seems short, I cannot see how this could properly cool an i7 or i9.
Pretty normally, just with a lot of noise.

Keep in mind Intel gives the default configuration for how their CPUs boost (called: tau - length and PL2 - power consumption).
That's what these coolers are designed for.

The problem here is of course that DIY motherboard makers can apply different configuration - to make their motherboards stand out. We know they do that for -K SKUs on Z490.
How this looks on non-K SKUs or on other chipsets is still mostly unknown.

Even if 10900 pulls 150W when boosting, this tiny cooler will probably manage for half a minute.
 
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