So you don't have free speech if you are a professor in Florida's states university system

Page 2 - Seeking answers? Join the AnandTech community: where nearly half-a-million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
10,665
5,376
136
Im not going into a full diatribe here, as no one here wants to read it. But one point: Censorship does not necessarily undermine the pursuit of truth. We could trust the censor to filter out the untruths, and allow only the true ones to get through.

But

This assumed an infallible censor.

If youre truly interested, I suggest you read John Stuart Mill’s essay On Liberty. He succinctly words it better than I do.

Though JS Mill was a huge supporter of imperialism, particularly the British colonization of India. He was employed by the British East India Company for much of his life.

That seems to embody the impossible paradox around the issue of 'free speech' and liberalism in general.

"We're going to give you our idea of liberty, whether you want it or not"
 

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
10,665
5,376
136
I'm actually very curious as to what JS Mill's attitude was to "seditionary" speech by Indian nationalists. It could perhaps be he was at least consistent about that part. Part of the paradox of British rule in India seems to be that it introduced ideas of 'liberty' that it signally failed to live up to - helping construct the case against itself.
 
Last edited:

mikeymikec

Lifer
May 19, 2011
15,429
5,633
136
Im not going into a full diatribe here, as no one here wants to read it. But one point: Censorship does not necessarily undermine the pursuit of truth. We could trust the censor to filter out the untruths, and allow only the true ones to get through.

But

This assumed an infallible censor.

If youre truly interested, I suggest you read John Stuart Mill’s essay On Liberty. He succinctly words it better than I do.
Next time just say, "I've got nothing".
 

Lost_in_the_HTTP

Diamond Member
Nov 17, 2019
7,038
3,981
106
Lots of back and forth in this article, but as it shakes out, it seems like it's all about the money ....


"By Ryan Dailey – News Service of Florida

Nov 2, 2021

The accrediting organization for the University of Florida has taken preliminary steps that could lead to a probe into whether the university faces “non-compliance issues” over its decision to block three professors from serving as expert witnesses in a high-profile voting rights lawsuit.


With an investigation looming, the university clarified that the political science professors would be allowed to testify as plaintiffs’ witnesses if they don’t get paid or use school resources."

" The university later clarified its position.

“It is worth noting, the university views the professors' request as a request to be paid to testify against the state, and the university, as a public institution, is part of the state -- therefore, that would be adverse to the university's interests. However, to be clear, if the professors wish to do so pro bono on their own time without using university resources, they would be free to do so,” university officials said in a statement provided to the News Service Monday."


 

Fenixgoon

Lifer
Jun 30, 2003
29,628
6,239
136
Professors act as expert witnesses in court all the time. Legal consulting is a fairly lucrative gig. There's a potential conflict of interest, but that doesn't mean there actually is one. And certainly if the consulting were taking place outside office hours and not using University resources, I would expect that to mitigate a lot of the COI
 

allisolm

Elite Member
Administrator
Jan 2, 2001
24,276
2,642
136
And all this goes out with a whimper as UF reverses its decision and says the professors may testify and are allowed to get paid.

The governor's office said "we do not even understand the origin of the widespread narrative that the governor was somehow interfering with an internal UF matter. This is false, has always been false, and there is no evidence for it, only baseless allegations..."

Yeah, right. I'm sure that in the beginning of this particular brouhaha UF just up and decided on their own to completely change something that had been the policy for years right when the testimony happened to be against DeSantis. Sure they did. I guess the public criticism of the original decision outweighed the governor's supposedly nonexistent displeasure and/or interference. .

 
Last edited:

Lost_in_the_HTTP

Diamond Member
Nov 17, 2019
7,038
3,981
106
Coming up .....


Judge to rule soon on UF professors' lawsuit over testifying in court

Orlando Sentinel|21 minutes ago
A federal judge sharply criticized an attorney for the University of Florida on Friday during a hearing on whether six faculty members' free speech rights were infringed upon after the lawyer accused some of the professors of having no standing to make their cases because they had violated school policy.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY